8K Red Raw vs 8k Canon RAW or IPB

Community Beginner ,
Jan 13, 2021

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I have a Canon R5 camera, and it shoots 8K in either 10 bit 422 format, either RAW, IPB or ALL-I  HEVC encoding.  I have a very fast Windows 10 PC with an AMD 5950X CPU and Nvidia 3090 GPU and 64 GB of RAM.  Regardless the 8k HEVC encoded (that's the only encoding the camera will do) footage, or RAW footage is a pain to edit.  It's very slow in the sequence and you pretty much have to drop the clip there, and the render in to out to work with it.  Alternatively you can make proxies but these have their own problems with my workflow.  I think its because no high end GPU right now can encode or decode HEVC 10 bit 422 color. 

 

If I shoot 8 bit color instead editing is fast and easy (even in 8k).  But I lose 10 bit color and the final output suffers.

 

Additionally when you try and export the project to the final output file, it takes FOREVER.  Again I think the issue is 10 bit 422 with HEVC encoding but I'm not certain.

 

I tried some Red RAW format 8k footage and it's also snappy to edit.  You don't have to use Proxies, you don't have to pre-render the sequence to play it back smoothly etc.  It edits and exports easily and fairly quickly.  It's deep color and all that, probably better color than the R5 but it still edits and exports easily and fairly quickly. 

 

Is there something I can do to try and make Adobe run better with Canon EOS R5 8k 10 bit footage?  The RAW footage is super slow to edit and export, as is the 10 bit footage whether you use ALL-I or IPB type encoding.  Other than proxies and just pre-rendering the entire sequence so it can be previewed smoothly, is there something else I can try to make editing less painful with this footage?

 

-Roger Uzun

 

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Editing, Formats, Hardware or GPU, Performance

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8K Red Raw vs 8k Canon RAW or IPB

Community Beginner ,
Jan 13, 2021

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I have a Canon R5 camera, and it shoots 8K in either 10 bit 422 format, either RAW, IPB or ALL-I  HEVC encoding.  I have a very fast Windows 10 PC with an AMD 5950X CPU and Nvidia 3090 GPU and 64 GB of RAM.  Regardless the 8k HEVC encoded (that's the only encoding the camera will do) footage, or RAW footage is a pain to edit.  It's very slow in the sequence and you pretty much have to drop the clip there, and the render in to out to work with it.  Alternatively you can make proxies but these have their own problems with my workflow.  I think its because no high end GPU right now can encode or decode HEVC 10 bit 422 color. 

 

If I shoot 8 bit color instead editing is fast and easy (even in 8k).  But I lose 10 bit color and the final output suffers.

 

Additionally when you try and export the project to the final output file, it takes FOREVER.  Again I think the issue is 10 bit 422 with HEVC encoding but I'm not certain.

 

I tried some Red RAW format 8k footage and it's also snappy to edit.  You don't have to use Proxies, you don't have to pre-render the sequence to play it back smoothly etc.  It edits and exports easily and fairly quickly.  It's deep color and all that, probably better color than the R5 but it still edits and exports easily and fairly quickly. 

 

Is there something I can do to try and make Adobe run better with Canon EOS R5 8k 10 bit footage?  The RAW footage is super slow to edit and export, as is the 10 bit footage whether you use ALL-I or IPB type encoding.  Other than proxies and just pre-rendering the entire sequence so it can be previewed smoothly, is there something else I can try to make editing less painful with this footage?

 

-Roger Uzun

 

TOPICS
Editing, Formats, Hardware or GPU, Performance

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Jan 13, 2021 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 14, 2021

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You are correct when you stated " I think its because no high end GPU right now can encode or decode HEVC 10 bit 422 color". Intel's new consumer CPUs with the IGPU (Quick/Sync) should be able to encode and decode more variations of H.264.

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Jan 14, 2021 0