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Best practices for color correcting a single clip that has varying expose and ISO?

Community Beginner ,
Aug 28, 2020

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I have a clip that was filmed using automatic camera settings, so the contrast changes throughout the clip and I want to even that transition out in Premiere Pro but I'm wondering what the best practices are for that?

 

I'm assuming there is a dynamic / semi-automated way to do it, opposed to cutting the clip into pieces, and adjusting the levels manually.

 

I also realize that the best thing to do would have been not to make this mistake in the first place when filming. But now I have to work with what I have at this point. 🙂

 

Thank you for your time!

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Correct answer by R_Neil_Haugen | Adobe Community Professional

Color in Premiere is my "thang" ... but this is something that Premiere has no auto options for. So it's a manual job, either involving a ton of cuts and manually changing the brightness/exposure/darkness settings, or by doing keyframed changes. I've done both ways, and ... if you're really used to it and have a control surface, the keyframing is maybe a little faster.

 

But "litte faster" is like paint that dries in four hours rather than five or six.

 

There are two options in Resolve's color page for automating brightness changes. One effect involves using the entire frame for deciding on auto-changes, the other involves setting a target area (like a wall) that it keeps at a constant brightness. I prefer the later tool. And while I do for most things prefer working in Premiere ... this is something where if that is say a 30 minute or better clip, I'd do in Resolve.

 

Some people like that app's editing process ... I particularly do not. Tastes vary of course. So I'll use the Resolve color options for cleaning up this sort of clip. Then just export the clip from Resolve, import that in Premiere, and do the rest of my cutting and such in Premiere.

 

Neil

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Best practices for color correcting a single clip that has varying expose and ISO?

Community Beginner ,
Aug 28, 2020

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I have a clip that was filmed using automatic camera settings, so the contrast changes throughout the clip and I want to even that transition out in Premiere Pro but I'm wondering what the best practices are for that?

 

I'm assuming there is a dynamic / semi-automated way to do it, opposed to cutting the clip into pieces, and adjusting the levels manually.

 

I also realize that the best thing to do would have been not to make this mistake in the first place when filming. But now I have to work with what I have at this point. 🙂

 

Thank you for your time!

Adobe Community Professional
Correct answer by R_Neil_Haugen | Adobe Community Professional

Color in Premiere is my "thang" ... but this is something that Premiere has no auto options for. So it's a manual job, either involving a ton of cuts and manually changing the brightness/exposure/darkness settings, or by doing keyframed changes. I've done both ways, and ... if you're really used to it and have a control surface, the keyframing is maybe a little faster.

 

But "litte faster" is like paint that dries in four hours rather than five or six.

 

There are two options in Resolve's color page for automating brightness changes. One effect involves using the entire frame for deciding on auto-changes, the other involves setting a target area (like a wall) that it keeps at a constant brightness. I prefer the later tool. And while I do for most things prefer working in Premiere ... this is something where if that is say a 30 minute or better clip, I'd do in Resolve.

 

Some people like that app's editing process ... I particularly do not. Tastes vary of course. So I'll use the Resolve color options for cleaning up this sort of clip. Then just export the clip from Resolve, import that in Premiere, and do the rest of my cutting and such in Premiere.

 

Neil

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Aug 28, 2020 0
Guide ,
Aug 30, 2020

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how often does it change? every few minutes or every other frame?

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Aug 30, 2020 0
Community Beginner ,
Aug 30, 2020

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Between shots, which occur as infrequent as 3 seconds apart.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 30, 2020

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Color in Premiere is my "thang" ... but this is something that Premiere has no auto options for. So it's a manual job, either involving a ton of cuts and manually changing the brightness/exposure/darkness settings, or by doing keyframed changes. I've done both ways, and ... if you're really used to it and have a control surface, the keyframing is maybe a little faster.

 

But "litte faster" is like paint that dries in four hours rather than five or six.

 

There are two options in Resolve's color page for automating brightness changes. One effect involves using the entire frame for deciding on auto-changes, the other involves setting a target area (like a wall) that it keeps at a constant brightness. I prefer the later tool. And while I do for most things prefer working in Premiere ... this is something where if that is say a 30 minute or better clip, I'd do in Resolve.

 

Some people like that app's editing process ... I particularly do not. Tastes vary of course. So I'll use the Resolve color options for cleaning up this sort of clip. Then just export the clip from Resolve, import that in Premiere, and do the rest of my cutting and such in Premiere.

 

Neil

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Aug 30, 2020 1
Community Beginner ,
Aug 31, 2020

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Ok, thank you Neil.

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Aug 31, 2020 1