Color problem after export

Dec 05, 2020

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Hi everyone,

I have an issue with the exported color! As you can see from the image the color is different from the preview to the exported file! How can I fix this? I don't apply any color correction!

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Editing, Error or problem, Export

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Color problem after export

Dec 05, 2020

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Hi everyone,

I have an issue with the exported color! As you can see from the image the color is different from the preview to the exported file! How can I fix this? I don't apply any color correction!

TOPICS
Editing, Error or problem, Export

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57

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Dec 05, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Dec 05, 2020

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Dec 05, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Dec 05, 2020

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If you import the exported file into Premiere Pro, does it still look different?

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Dec 05, 2020 0
Dec 06, 2020

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Hi, I solved the problem! It was Vlc that apply a color correction! Now it's fine, thank you!

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Dec 06, 2020 1
Adobe Community Professional ,
Dec 05, 2020

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This type of post is nearly always a problem caused by the user not understanding the morass that is "color managment" on computers.

 

First ... no camera has a color-correct image viewer on the camera, not even the very expensive ones. It's why all "pro" shoots have spendy location monitors along with them.

 

Second, no computer OS totally "sticks" the landing for color management. Apple's Retina based Macs intentionally mis-apply Rec.709 standards, which is rather nasty of them, but PCs often simply don't care to follow Rec709 correctly on account of "wishing to enhance the viewing experience".

 

And computer monitors are as bad as the OS ... and often work differently as they also go about "enhancing the viewing experience".

 

So unless and until the user learns how to get around the above, you have no clue what your image actually should be when seen "correctly" according to the data on the file.

 

Premiere is built to be used on systems with properly setup Rec.709 broadcast-standard viewing systems. Which is the standard for nearly all video media used still today. It works perfectly on such systems.

 

After Apple came out with ColorSync's misapplication of Rec.709, in not applying the second of the two required transform functions of that standard, Adobe came up with the "Display Color Management" option in the preferences. This tells Premiere to look for the monitor ICC profile, and from that remap the image to attempt to show a proper Rec.709 image on that screen. After export, the images will appear pretty correct on a properly color managed system. But ... not on one that isn't.

 

Well, no properly treated file from a properly color managed system will look the same on one that isn't, will it?

 

That Display Color Management option also helps a lot of PC users get around troubles. But again, that is just on seeing to it that you see the image correctly within Premiere. If the system is "off", Premiere cannot help you see it correctly outside of Premiere.

 

Pro colorists spend more on the calibration and profiling hardware/software than we spend on our entire computer setup. That's not counting the additional $5,000 for a proper Grade 1 Reference Monitor or $17,000 and up for a Grade 1 HDR Reference monitor. Most of which are close to or above $30,000.

 

And they can't make something look the same outside their systems either. Guaranteed, you will never see exactly what they saw while grading that show or movie. As "out in the Wild" it's pretty ... wild. Every device and viewing environment will see it differently.

 

Neil

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Dec 05, 2020 1