Highlighted

Computer cannot process Premiere

Explorer ,
Jul 26, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

AMD Ryzen 7 3800X processor

GeForce GTX 1660 Super

64GB RAM

Windows

 

I changed the Speed/Duration of a 3-second clip to 120%. Playback chops up like a slaughterhouse. I don't know what I'm doing wrong. I have a similar issue with some of the special effects which state "Your graphics card is unable to process this effect" yet my card is listed under supported cards.

 

Someone throw me a bone.

unfortunately h264 is not really a great codec for editing in ANY editor. Luckily hardware has gotten really fast so it can be done, but sometimes causes progam to choke.

Try to proxy your stuff to cineform or DNxHD or prores 'before' you do the speed change. Like, start from the beginning with the proxy on.

Might be a lot better.

ON card issue, sometimes using software only will do the trick but take longer ( it uses cpu only and don't think it uses any graphic chip stuff ).

 

Don't be mad at us imperfect users if we don't express ourselves like people who studied rhetoric at university. I recently realized I need to rein in my subjective attitude and be more objective, due to insulting some poster here. 

Anyway, good luck and it shouldn't take long to try those things. You might have to delete your cache before you start from the beginning, cause you're right.... there is some sloppy programming going on with all the new additions and so on. 

Topics

Crash, Error or problem, Hardware or GPU, Performance

Views

102

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more

Computer cannot process Premiere

Explorer ,
Jul 26, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

AMD Ryzen 7 3800X processor

GeForce GTX 1660 Super

64GB RAM

Windows

 

I changed the Speed/Duration of a 3-second clip to 120%. Playback chops up like a slaughterhouse. I don't know what I'm doing wrong. I have a similar issue with some of the special effects which state "Your graphics card is unable to process this effect" yet my card is listed under supported cards.

 

Someone throw me a bone.

unfortunately h264 is not really a great codec for editing in ANY editor. Luckily hardware has gotten really fast so it can be done, but sometimes causes progam to choke.

Try to proxy your stuff to cineform or DNxHD or prores 'before' you do the speed change. Like, start from the beginning with the proxy on.

Might be a lot better.

ON card issue, sometimes using software only will do the trick but take longer ( it uses cpu only and don't think it uses any graphic chip stuff ).

 

Don't be mad at us imperfect users if we don't express ourselves like people who studied rhetoric at university. I recently realized I need to rein in my subjective attitude and be more objective, due to insulting some poster here. 

Anyway, good luck and it shouldn't take long to try those things. You might have to delete your cache before you start from the beginning, cause you're right.... there is some sloppy programming going on with all the new additions and so on. 

Topics

Crash, Error or problem, Hardware or GPU, Performance

Views

103

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 26, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

what are your source properties and what your sequence settings.

have you tried rendering it?  Also you might try setting the frame interpolation in the clip speed/duration dialog to optical flow.  will be a longer render but usually gives you much better results.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Explorer ,
Jul 26, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

How do I find 'source properties'? I'm using H.264 files pulling from a local HDD.

 

How do I locate 'sequence settings'? 

 

I should not need to render this file before being able to view it. I'm not working with megalithic data proportions - they are fraction clips with minimal to no effects.

 

Optical Flow looks 3% better.

 

I really appreciate the quick response.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 26, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

This is very basic stuff...  select a source clip in the bin or in the timeline and control click or right click and choose "properties."  Make the timeline active, or select the sequence in the been and control click or right click and choose sequence settings.    If you've got a red line at the top of the timeline... you've may get adequate playback but more than likely.... you've got to render.    Don't take this the wrong way, but Premiere is a professional video editing program and in order to use it effectively you'll need to learn a whole lot of stuff...   I'm a great believer in diving in at the deep end of the pool, but when things don't work the way you expect them to, it's not always the programs fault.  The Adobe Premiere forum is an amazing resource and there are many people here willing to help.   So give us the info I've asked for and hopefully we can figure out what's going on

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Explorer ,
Jul 28, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

H.264 files stored on a local HDD. Is that the info you're looking for?

 

The clips all have yellow lines above them in the timeline. I rendered the 5-second clip which did make the clip viewable but the render took like 20 seconds. I don't undestand what I'm doing wrong here. There is no way it should be taking that long.


Please don't make this personal - I know they are basic issues. It is why I'm here asking questions. Some advice for the future: saying things like "This is very basic stuff..." and "Don't take this the wrong way, but Premiere is a professional video editing program and in order to use it effectively you'll need to learn a whole lot of stuff..." often have a negative impact on the reader and contain zero advice - they are both obvious to the reader already. Taking those two sentences out would have made your comment 100% legitimate. 

 

I have found it difficult to find information about these little issues I've been having. It took me a few days just to find that Adobe actually has a sort of user manual for Premiere but the problem is: if I don't the exact word or term Adobe uses for certain features, I am bound for failure - it is impossible to discover information unless I already know what I'm looking for.

 

I believe in the immediate usefulness of programs - it is evidence of a thoughtful production team. Non-linear editors are actually very simple interfaces - Premiere is not a phenomenal program while none of the other non-linear editors are phenomenal either. They are all outdated and inadequate. If you have two monitors, two graphics cards, a 20TB SSD and professional training in how to use the program, then you're good-to-go. The layout of my house would make sense if I sat down and lectured you on it but that doesn't mean I shouldn't arrange it so you can find your way around if I weren't there.

 

I remember having no problems using Premiere when I was in high school. It was extremely simple - drag-&-drop, right-click features, and simple interactive graphs, although it had limitations on layers. The current version is like sorting through a pile of scrap metal. I can't believe how inaccessible or nonexistent some features are. Anways, as I mentioned before, I am not here to discuss personal issues. I've come here looking for answers. I appreciate you taking the time to help me with my issue.

 

Although I could be wrong, I believe the latency is a software issue not a hardware issue. I had the same problem with Blender's non-linear editor, which is way more simple to use, but it can't handle playback at all. It is possible there is a setting I need to change regarding my computer hardware. Anyways, I digress.

 

Thanks, again, for your time - I really appreciate it.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 28, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

You say you came here for answers..   We can't help without more information.  I gave you very specific instructions on how to get this information...  

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 28, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

NLEs and other pro video post apps are complex tools performing very complex processes, with tons of details for the user to control. I have no clue how they could be designed to be simple and obvious to work with ... I've experience with Premiere, the long-gone SpeedGrade, AfterEffects, Audition, and Resolve from usage ... and Avid, Nuke, Baselight and a few others from studying them.

 

Premiere is not the most complex to learn of that group. They all take a ton of learning to use well.

 

Neil

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Explorer ,
Jul 29, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Source properties: H.264 from local HDD

Sequence settings: DNX 1080p

25 fps

square pixels (1.0)

25fps timecode

preview: DNX 120 1080p 25

Codec: DNxHD

1920x1080

Composite in linear colour

 

You suggested I "CTRL+Click or right-click" something in the timeline - I'm not sure if that instruction was to find sequence settings or Source Properties. Either way, it was the same action menu for clips which came up. I found 'Sequence Settings' in the main menu at the top along with the standard 'File' and 'Edit' menus. Under the 'Sequence' menu is Sequence Settings.

 

Any time I change the length of the rendered clip it reverts back to an unrendered version. I then must render it again for playback. As per my previous analogy, it is like wading through a pile of scrap metal. With something as simple as graphics editing I'm not sure why a program should require professional education in order to ensure the clip I dropped into the Timeline plays at a reasonable framerate.

 

For reference, I use FL Studio as my sound engineering platform. Their GUI is what I'd expect from a professional program. It's just more fine-tuned than the GUI of Premiere.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Advocate ,
Jul 28, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

unfortunately h264 is not really a great codec for editing in ANY editor. Luckily hardware has gotten really fast so it can be done, but sometimes causes progam to choke.

Try to proxy your stuff to cineform or DNxHD or prores 'before' you do the speed change. Like, start from the beginning with the proxy on.

Might be a lot better.

ON card issue, sometimes using software only will do the trick but take longer ( it uses cpu only and don't think it uses any graphic chip stuff ).

 

Don't be mad at us imperfect users if we don't express ourselves like people who studied rhetoric at university. I recently realized I need to rein in my subjective attitude and be more objective, due to insulting some poster here. 

Anyway, good luck and it shouldn't take long to try those things. You might have to delete your cache before you start from the beginning, cause you're right.... there is some sloppy programming going on with all the new additions and so on. 

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Explorer ,
Jul 29, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Thanks, I'll give DNxHD a try.

 

I love that you bring up subjectivity & objectivity - it has been, in my experience, fundamental when solving problems.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Advocate ,
Jul 28, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I got a nikon d800 a while back and it records to SD ( and maybe cf if I want) as mov h264, 4.2,0. It doesn't have a great editing potential or quality potential. It's basically a still camera that added video feature. But it's full frame 35, and I shoot stills sometimes. Anyway, I bought a fairly inexpensive Ninja thing so I could record out of the camera hdmi ( uncompressed signal ) to the Ninja, using DNxHD in a 10 bit space, 4.2.2. ( and higher bit rate ). Better quality, in terms of the space it is now in... but it doesn't add more than 4.2.0, as that is what the chip puts out , and now I don't have to proxy... when I xfer the SSD stuff to internal drives, it's already happy to be edited. 

But I also have a bmpcc 4k with Braw that I use, and that needs to be proxied sometimes even in Resolve.

 

That doesn't help you, but you can see how I try to sorta skip the h264 stuff... right ??

 

 

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Advocate ,
Jul 28, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

It's kinda confusing but when I say 'proxy' in your case I don't mean you have to change the camera and captured video, etc. I mean that you let the program proxy it ( it's similar to transcoding ). It will take time for that to happen so be patient. The stuff gets put into cache and is happy to be edited.

If not you're basically screwed.

hehe... then you have to find out more stuff and fix it.

 

Let's have a beer and talk about it.

 

That's hilarious, cause the king of this forum is really trying to become the king.

Along with others who want to sell their products here.

 

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Explorer ,
Jul 29, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Encoding H.264 into DNxHD definitely made a difference. This is what make it so frustrating for me. Now I need to copy and transcode all of my footage to a different format just so Premiere can play it back properly. That, to me, is not my job. It is Adobe's job to ensure their program works on demand - it shouldn't be up to me to copy all of my footage over to a different filetype. It should just work. If I were a software engineer I would be happy to take on that task - it's what I would have trained for. However, I am not a software engineer - I am trying to do very simple editing with a program that is touted as "what the pros use". Do the pros go out with their $50k camera set-up recorded at max resolution then come back and reformat all the footage to DNxHD so Premiere can process it more quickly? I'm using footage that was taken on RED and ARRI cameras.

 

My experience since the late 2000's has been how everything around me has become lower quality. Materials have become better but the products built with the better materials are getting worse and worse. Computers have become so powerful if I were told "Your computer in 2020 will have 12GB of dedicated memory" I would have laughed. Yet, the same cannot be said for production - nobody knows what to do with all that power.

 

I'm really disappointed & close to selling my computer and giving up. I can't believe I spent $2500 on something that can't run a program out-of-the-box. There is a possibility running my data off an HDD is what causes the latency - I'll be looking into that before I decide to get rid of my computer. With a filesize of 56MB I'm not sure why my 64GB of RAM and my 6GB of memory dedicated, specifically, to graphics is unable to process 120% reverse playback. Someone get an Adobe developer in here to chime in on the conversation.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 29, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I have to admit, it's really frustrating to read your posts.

 

Some day we may live in your plug and play world where things are made to your spec. Until then we have ever changing computer hardware, ever changing operating systems, ever changing cameras, codecs, resolution and framerate expectations, hard drives, cables, even legalities! (codecs and IP needs to be licensed) The list goes on and on. Editing software is one thing in the middle of that giant flux of software and hardware, but apparently it has the sole responsibility of picking up all the slack being perfect? If it was all static and never changed, then sure: maybe the developers could tinker until it all works perfectly.

 

Your computer sounds fine. The type of media you work with has a large impact on playback performance. There are video codecs like h264 and h265 that are highly compressed and they are great at the end of the process when you want to reduce file size, but they aren't great for editing as they are hardware-intensive to decode (you could also choose to be upset at the deveopers of h264? Or maybe the camera manufacturer that was too cheap to offer you something besides that? Just throwing out some options.) There are professional editing codecs (like the DNxHD you tried out) that are made for editing. They are decoded in a different way that's easier for your hardware to take advantage of. These two different types of media -- interframe and intraframe -- have been around for a long time and professional editors have professional workflows that take advantage of them. Decades of fools and hacks that never stopped to say: "it's not my job" as a professional editor to know about media (codecs, bitrate, drive speed, etc.)

 

"Do the pros go out with their $50k camera set-up recorded at max resolution then come back and reformat all the footage to DNxHD so Premiere can process it more quickly?" YES

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Explorer ,
Jul 29, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Thanks for the info regarding media types. 

 

I'm really interested in your experience with the variety of programming tools you mentioned. If there was a handful of media options (filetypes and codecs) you suggest I learn more about which ones would you suggest? I'm curious to know how filetypes are used at certain stages of the editing process. I assume there are some who shoot in one, edit in another, then export as a final one. The reason I ask for your suggestion is that I expect there to be a collection of filetypes commonly used in the industry. Many people have suggested DNxHD which I had not previously heard of. I have also seen others using ProRes. As far as I understand: framerate, resolution, and colour are all data while codecs manage each of those layers to properly bake as a single file. I guess codecs run forward and backward.

 

I agree, to expect a software company to deal with the tumultuous roiling spectrum of data, codecs, and filetypes in a way which allows all users to utilize its programs effectively is a high bar to set. It is a complex task to settle in to a tradeable set of media but I think a task that will prove worthwhile. In the meantime, I do hope Adobe continues to strive for the best and that software developers work toward unifying media. Companies vying for the Consumer throne is ruining the fun in creating movies.

 

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Advocate ,
Jul 30, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Focal,

I grew up working in film biz as a grip on movies, tv commercials, episodic TV shows shot in film (is a film union in NYC). So, no video.. that's different union and equipment and everything. I'm 70. There was a great pushback against digital but film lost and everyone went bust on film ( Polaroid, Kodak, etc.) and all the film cameras with mitchel movements are now used to moor sailboats. It's frustrating to have to learn new stuff and make it work the way you used to do stuff. Bleach baths for color are now done digitally, and film grain is now 'noise'. And things keep changing rapidly. I don't get, for example, how anyone can develop a variable frame rate. What the ??

The red raw needs to be made linear and debayered before editing. It is proxied ususally. The arri can shoot log c or prores out the camera. I now know of one popular tv show using arri that just goes right to prores out of camera, and they got rid of the DIT station and just use video playback now ( with scopes ) and basically 'what they see ' at playback is 'what gets broadcast'. But those are pro sets where lights are balanced to specific color temp and they have tons of ways to control the shot ( like translites (backdrops) behind walls of windows that make it look like an outdoor scene out there, but in reality is fake. Some are now using giant screens that are like a wall of video, instead of translites. Takes up less room on set. Can have motion cause plate shots are done to play on that screen.

Most people use raw (as prosumers ) thinking they can just change anything they want later ( ISO, WB, F STOP, ETC.) and it will look great. If the white got blown out no big deal. Black got closed, no big deal. That's not how raw is shot on film stages. It's matched just like you would for film, and light meters are used and color meters, etc. Two different mentalities.  And the work flow is what it has to be when it goes to post house..which is like a factory. So it's done fast and a one hour episodic show can get broadcast a couple weeks after it was 'in the can'.

Nobody, and I mean nobody, in my experience, used PC's or PPro on sets. I have no clue what people use in post house.

We are very lucky though. I can stop buying expensive film and having work prints made and have to edit on a flatbed. So it's cheaper, less toxic (no more chemicals), faster, and I can edit in my house with a computer and monitors that cost maybe about $8,000. I got my video monitor used from a DP friend who had to upgrade to 4k (mine is full HD ), so saved a few thousand on that.

Unfortunately I am not good at shooting and using fluid head and I haven't made quality stuff to edit. But I use pretty cheap nikon d800 with bunch of lenses, and a bmpcc 4k. The nikon I record to ninja and get DNxHD out of it instead of the stupid h264 4.2.0 stuff the camera puts on SD card. The blackmagic camera is BRAW.

You just have to do what you have to do, is what it all boils down to.

 

How fast new stuff comes out and how fast Adobe upgrades to handle new codecs is a company problem and not mine thank goodness.

 

Lastly, it's not foolish to be frustrated when things are not working as desired. It's normal.

 

The people who help in this forum often need to repeat themselves a LOT to help those with similar problems who didn't search for answers first.  So now you get two frustrated people. The poster and the fellow user answering post. Yikes.

Good luck. 

If you want to proxy h264 the most common is prores and cineform around here.

DNxHD has also changed a little and same with prores ... in terms of having newer versions for the newer cameras. But once you get it down ( know what works well for your use and equipment ) you'll be happy as a clam.

 

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Advocate ,
Jul 30, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

DNxHD has also changed a little and same with prores ... in terms of having newer versions for the newer cameras

 

what I mean is DNxHR and prores raw. I have no clue what prores raw is and don't want to know.

The DNxHR is new in that it is no longer pinned to a specific resolution and bitrate, color space ...like, for example, DNxHD 220x ( which I use ) is for full HD 10 bit 4.2.2. You'll probably use the new thing.

 

 

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Focal LATEST
Explorer ,
Jul 30, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Thanks, Salvo. 

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...