Converting one clip into two...

Jan 10, 2021

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Hi all,

 

I'm organizing a project that was shot on 16mm film that was scanned and digitized. Kodak gave me all the footage strungout on one clip. Is there a quick way to splice each shot with it's corrolating audio and export them as their individual shots (1A, B, 2A, B, C and so on)? I'd prefer to avoid nesting each clip as well as exporting using ins and outs—I figured there's a more efficient and professional workflow.

 

Thanks for your time,

MR

 

p.s. I know syncing takes time, I'm referring solely to exporting each clip from the stringout. 

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Editing, Export

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Converting one clip into two...

Jan 10, 2021

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Hi all,

 

I'm organizing a project that was shot on 16mm film that was scanned and digitized. Kodak gave me all the footage strungout on one clip. Is there a quick way to splice each shot with it's corrolating audio and export them as their individual shots (1A, B, 2A, B, C and so on)? I'd prefer to avoid nesting each clip as well as exporting using ins and outs—I figured there's a more efficient and professional workflow.

 

Thanks for your time,

MR

 

p.s. I know syncing takes time, I'm referring solely to exporting each clip from the stringout. 

TOPICS
Editing, Export

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Jan 10, 2021 0
Jan 10, 2021

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not sure why you'd nest.  Why not just create a sequence for each shot and name the sequence appropriately and then you can do a batch export by queing to Adobe Media Encoder?  Not sure it's any faster than exporting by ins and outs and not sure what makes something more "professional."

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Jan 10, 2021 0
Jan 10, 2021

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I think I might understand what your trying to do...  so I will take a swing at answering it, hopefully.

If your clip from Kodak is all one big file and the audio is already part of the video....

 

Run Scene Edit Detection, and select the option to put the clips in its own Bin like this dialog shows:

Scene Edit Detect Dialog.jpg

 

Once this process is completed, there will be a BIN in the media area.  you can select all of the clips it put into that Bin,  the icon for these new clips looks like this:

Icons Scene Edit Detect Dialog.jpg

With all the clips selected, you can then press CTRL-M which will bring up the export dialog.  you can make your typical export setting, and then export it using Media Encoder.  This will create a file for every clip as a stand alone video file, it will include the sound etc.

 

Not sure if this was exactly what you were looking for, hope it helps.

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Jan 10, 2021 2
Jan 11, 2021

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This is great, exactly what I was looking for. Thank you!

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Jan 11, 2021 0
Jan 11, 2021

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Great idea but... probably a good idea to check each edit. I haven't tried
scene detection in Premiere yet but in resolve in certain circumstances its
problematic.

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Jan 11, 2021 1
Jan 11, 2021

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Yes, I would check every cut also.  I will say that Adobe's aprouach to detection is different that Resolve (which uses histogram modeling and detects the amount of changes different).  Resolve requires you to pick tolerences etc if I recall correct.  With Adobe version there is no adjustments to make, I have tested it on over 8 hours (in 2hour blocks) of old footage from a Hi8 analog tape.  It was near flawless,  It was very surpirsing how well it worked.

 

It is however a very good idea to check each automatic cut point, as comming of 16mm film might make not work as well.  I will say, that when you drop the clip the AI created on your timeline, you can move the in/out points, but it doesnt update the in out in the bin, which is what is needed to happen if you want to export the clips with different in out points than the AI detects.   Not sure how to create new in out points when using the export methode I detailed in my first post.  I tried it in the source window, in the timeline, and even dragging it back into the bin from the time line after I adjusted the in out points, it always keeps the original timecode in out points...

 

The only way I found that seems to (somewhat) work, is to use project manager, (screen shot below) and change the handles before and after each clip to something bigger than you need, so you can trim it in your final project.  In this case I tried with 300 extra frames before/after each sub-clip.  It works, but it will mean you have to edit each clip for new inout points when you drop them into your final timeline, but at least the handles give you extra footage to trim if needed.

 

Hopefully, the AI detected points work good enough for your project....  that will save you tons of time if it does.

 

Project Manager.jpg

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Jan 11, 2021 0
Jan 11, 2021

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One more thing to add,  now that my export project with project manager is complete,  all the clips I had on the timeline were exported to a new project file that kept them on the timeline, along with the original in out points I set, but it also had the extra 300 frames before and after the clip I could expand the clip to if needed.  The clip that was saved as its own file on the HDD still had the extra 300 frame handles, but at least the new project file kept the original in out points.  Maybe this methode also will work in some cases for you. 

 

I guess at some point if your time, once your timeline is perfect, you can use the export project manager feature and not add any extra frames for the handles, and this would the only way I can think of to tweak the in out points if the needs to have adjusted points and you want to export as a seperate clip file afterwards.

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Jan 11, 2021 1
Jan 11, 2021

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Thank you all, this has been very helpful.

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Jan 11, 2021 0