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converting slow-mo gopro hero 8 footage to cinemaform

New Here ,
May 17, 2020

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I just got a GoPro, and I was having a ton of trouble editing the footage. lots of playback stuttering even with my 1080p slow-mo footage. my computer handles 4k footage off my other camera no sweat. I have a pretty decent pc 1080ti with 32gigs of ram and an i7.

 

looked around found out because of GoPro compresses stuff I have to convert it using the Cinema form preset in Media Encoder. But Media encoder caps the frame rate of the outgoing video at 60fps. I shot at 239 fps so I could slow down my footage, and its a NIGHTMARE to edit with all this lag. I don't really want to mess with proxies if I can help it. is there a different setting I am supposed to use?

 

tl;dr

how do I convert GoPro footage into cinema in Media Encoder form and keep the frame rate?

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converting slow-mo gopro hero 8 footage to cinemaform

New Here ,
May 17, 2020

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I just got a GoPro, and I was having a ton of trouble editing the footage. lots of playback stuttering even with my 1080p slow-mo footage. my computer handles 4k footage off my other camera no sweat. I have a pretty decent pc 1080ti with 32gigs of ram and an i7.

 

looked around found out because of GoPro compresses stuff I have to convert it using the Cinema form preset in Media Encoder. But Media encoder caps the frame rate of the outgoing video at 60fps. I shot at 239 fps so I could slow down my footage, and its a NIGHTMARE to edit with all this lag. I don't really want to mess with proxies if I can help it. is there a different setting I am supposed to use?

 

tl;dr

how do I convert GoPro footage into cinema in Media Encoder form and keep the frame rate?

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Enthusiast ,
May 17, 2020

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I'm not super confident about this answer as I've NEVER had to do this, but someone may be able to help verify. I'm just going off of software theory here.

 

I don't think Premiere can export Cineform at anything higher than 60fps, that said, you can interpret footage from within Media Encoder and could likely use that to essentially change the rate at which the frames are being packed into file, and make that fit into a 60fps file (or well, I guess in your case it'd be 59.94).

 

Load all of your clips into a ME queue, right-click the file name(s) and select Interpret Footage. Then under Frame Rate, select "Assume this frame rate" and type in 59.94. This will make your footage 4x longer than the original clip (and therefore will be 4x slower). However, now you can export this as a 59.94 Cineform file and each frame is uniquely represented in the file.

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New Here ,
May 17, 2020

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becasue the camera records at 10x23.976 i worry that the frame rate will be off if I try to trick it. I found a crappy work around were I can make a proxy at 23.976 and just suffer the frame drops when doing time remaping. the final edit comes out alright. Its frustrating that media encoder doesnt have any options for slow motion cameras, and its doubly frustrating that gopro effectivly stopped supporting a touted feature of their product by shutting down the studio encoder 

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Enthusiast ,
May 18, 2020

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Well, I'll preface this by saying that things that should matter sometimes don't, and stuff sometimes just DOESN'T work (of course...) but.....

 

It shouldn't matter.

 

23.976 x 10 = 239.76

29.97 x 8 = 239.76

59.94 x 4 = 239.76

 

The magical part about this is it's evenly divisible by all of these frame rates, so there shouldn't be any difference no matter how you slice it. A 100 second video will have 23,976 frames in it. (I'm praying I'm not missing a drop frame consideration here or something... in theory that should be the same too though right?) You're just changing how many frames are placed into any given second and thus affecting the new playback speed of the clip.

 

I would suggest at least trying it if you ever get fed up with the performance you're getting.

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