Created Proxies, but clips are still lagging (especially when using templates).

New Here ,
May 10, 2021 May 10, 2021

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Hello,

 

Computer specs:

 

Windows 10

Processor: Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-8400H CPU @ 2.50GHz 2.50 GHz

RAM: 32.0 GB (31.8 GB usable)

System Type: 64-bit operating system, x64-based processo

 

I recently discovered proxies and was incredibly relieved! At first, my playback was running smooth and editing was a breeze. However, it appears my timeline is back to lagging even with the proxies created and the proxies toggled on. The lagging is especially bad when I am edditing clips within a template I bought off evanto market.

 

My machine is very powerful, so I am assuming it's something I am doing wrong in regard to proxies or the way I am editing the template. Please help!

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Editing, Performance

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Adobe Community Professional ,
May 10, 2021 May 10, 2021

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PrPro is an incredibly demanding app on hardware. A three year old 4-core/8-thread CPU at 2.5Ghz with 32GB of RAM is adequate to work in PrPro but not what one would call a robust machine. There are ways to keep working with that rig in PrPro but ... you have to puzzle some things out.

 

Such as proxies ... yea, with that rig, a lot of media especially anything in 4k/up and most H.264 is going to require proxies for smooth playback. Plus ... you may need to do render/replace operations with clips on the timeline if you do any work like Warp, Lumetri, video noise reduction, or time changes (speeding up/slowing/ramping).

 

Next, the format of the proxies matters. Some people think they need "small" proxies for file-size ... and choose H.264. Which on most rigs will have as much if not more trouble in playback. The ProRes and Cineform proxy presets give you a low-res file that plays back easier on the hardware.

 

And ... we don't know anything about the template you bought, so some details as to what that does would help sort out giving the best advice.

 

Neil

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Adobe Community Professional ,
May 10, 2021 May 10, 2021

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Neil is right, we don't know much about the template you bought, but the thing you need to understand about some templates is that you are essentially importing an After Effects composition into your sequence. This isn't going to play in real-time in After Effects without being pre-cached first, and it's not going to play in Premiere without being pre-cached first (rendered). Some templates can be incredibly demanding, but even if it's middle of the road you're still compositing multiple layers of footage and that increases the demand on processing. Having proxies is going to help, especially if they are intraframe (like the Quicktime ProRes or Cineform codecs that Neil mentioned) but when you introduce effects and compositing into your workflow, you need to render. Keep an eye on the top of the timeline. If it turns red, that's an indication that you're probably going to need to render that for real-time playback, but even if it stays yellow you still may need to.

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