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Custom frame rate?

New Here ,
Mar 23, 2014

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I am trying to acheive a stop motion like effect on my videos. I have right clicked on my sequence, selected sequence settings, changed editing mode to "custom", and then get a wider range of frames per second (10fps-60fps). But I need a lower fps than 10 to get a better looking stop motion effect. Possibly 6fps? I have tried right clicking footage, modify, interpret footage and then "assuming frame rate" but that gives a slow motion effect. This is in Premiere pro CC by the way. Thanks

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Custom frame rate?

New Here ,
Mar 23, 2014

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I am trying to acheive a stop motion like effect on my videos. I have right clicked on my sequence, selected sequence settings, changed editing mode to "custom", and then get a wider range of frames per second (10fps-60fps). But I need a lower fps than 10 to get a better looking stop motion effect. Possibly 6fps? I have tried right clicking footage, modify, interpret footage and then "assuming frame rate" but that gives a slow motion effect. This is in Premiere pro CC by the way. Thanks

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Mar 23, 2014 0
LEGEND ,
Mar 23, 2014

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Change the clip within a normal framerate sequence to achieve this "effect".

There is an effect 'Posterise Time' ( IIRC)  that may suit you.

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Mar 23, 2014 2
Community Beginner ,
Jun 02, 2015

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I have a similar problem. For cutting an old silent movieI'd need to create a sequence with a framerate of 20 or 16 frames per second (as used in old 16mm cameras). Is there any possibility? Will Adobe do some implementation of this in future or do you know any workaround?

Many thanks!!

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Jun 02, 2015 0
Enthusiast ,
Jun 02, 2015

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Same answer. Look under Effects > Time > Posterize Time

Apply the effect to the clip in the timeline, double-click the clip in the timeline to open in Source, go to Effects Controls and adjust Frame Rate as desired.

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Jun 02, 2015 1
Community Beginner ,
Jun 02, 2015

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Many thanks for your answer. But that's not the solution for the

problem: The whole project needs to be in 20 or 16 frames per second,

that means the whole workflow including the times indicated in the

timeline.

When creating a new sequence, you can choose of different frame rates

like 10, 12, 23.9, 24, 25, 30 etc. but not 20 or 16 that would be

necessary for silent film editing...

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Jun 02, 2015 1
Enthusiast ,
Jun 02, 2015

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Ah, so sorry.

The work-around (that I use) is to make a copy of a clip in the Project window that is the correct image size, right-click on the clip and choose Modify > Interpret Footage, modify the Assume this frame rate: to the desired frame rate (i.e. 16.00 fps), click OK, now drag this modified clip to the "Make New" icon in the lower right corner of the Project window and create a Sequence that matches the source.

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Jun 02, 2015 2
Adobe Employee ,
Jun 02, 2015

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How do you plan on outputting the sequence, i.e. what's your playback mechanism? Is your media coming in at 16 or 20 fps? Unless you plan on exporting at either 16 or 20 fps--which, technically, you won't be able to do with Premiere Pro anyway--you can use whatever frame rate source in a more standard frame rate sequence. Pr won't speed up or slow down the source footage when it's dropped into a sequence with mismatching frame rate; instead, it will simply duplicate or interpret frames as necessary to keep a 1:1 playback ratio.

There are some workflow possibilities here, but knowing more about your source and intended output will help guide our recommendations.

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Jun 02, 2015 0
Enthusiast ,
Jun 02, 2015

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Ouch, Yeah I don't see a way to export 16 or 20 fps.

I suppose you could drop to 15 (substitute for the 16) or go up to 60 and then use a 3rd party app to hack back down to 20 fps (QuickTime 7 Pro does allow for custom frame rates)

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Jun 02, 2015 0
Community Beginner ,
Jun 03, 2015

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The film will be exported in different formats, the most important is

the tiff-sequence. That means that I could interprete the source as

24fps and edit the film in a higher speed. Theoretically.

But the problem is that I'd need to use the sequence for adding the

synchronized music, too. That means that the timebase of 16 or 18 frames

per second will be absolutely necessary and I can't do a workaround.

Unfortunately, there isn't even a multiple of 16 or 18 fps listed...

ADOBE, PLEASE, IMPLEMENT THIS OPTION AS SOON AS POSSIBLE and don't force

me to change to another software...;/

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Jun 03, 2015 0
Enthusiast ,
Jun 03, 2015

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Maybe I'm interpreting your situation wrong but, if you specifically need a sequence that is at a unusual frame rate then my workaround above will create and allow you to edit within that sequence. The problem with that workaround is that you can't export a media file at an unsupported frame rate.

So, create the 16/18 fps sequence and edit as I've suggested, then export at the desired (supported) frame rate. You could even nest the 16/18 fps sequence into a 24 fps sequence if desired before export, the results should be identical.

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Jun 03, 2015 0
Adobe Employee ,
Jun 03, 2015

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Why the TIFF sequence? Are you going back film with the edit sequence? I'm just trying to get a better handle of what you plan to do after export in order to make better recommendations. FWIW, TIFF sequence export doesn't include audio, anyway, so I presume you'd be synchronizing the picture and sound elsewhere later on.

Regarding other export frame rates, that's certainly not a common request, but the only way we hear them is if they're filed here: Adobe - Feature Request/Bug Report Form

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Jun 03, 2015 0
Community Beginner ,
Jun 03, 2015

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@Qengineering: Now I understand! You're great, it's really working to

create a 16 fps sequence.

@Colin: Exactly, the tiffs or dpx sequence is a common standard for the

archiving master, of which we also create the DCP.

I found out that it is working by sending the sequence to Speedgrade or

Aftereffects where I can enter a custom frame rate and export it,

keeping this framerate, as image sequences or ProRes. But it's taking

half of a day for only 30mins of footage...

So, why not being consistent and keeping this option in all the elements

of the creative suite? It would be really making the life easier if 16

fps, 18 fps (both used a lot with old 16mm silent films or digitalized

amateur film footage), 48fps would be part of the options directly in

the export of Premiere (eg. instead of the much more uncommon 15 fps or

8fps...;).

Thanks for the link, I'll report this.

And thanks for your help!!

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Jun 03, 2015 0
Enthusiast ,
Jun 03, 2015

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Wow, thank YOU for the export work-around (albeit slow), I'll make note of it for future reference!

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Jun 03, 2015 0
Community Beginner ,
Jun 03, 2015

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Make sure that you go in After Effects first, and then import the

premiere pro project. Then it will adapt the framerate. Otherwise, if

you send it from premiere, you'll only find the usual few framerate-options.

For my project, where the source is in 16fps (silent film from the

30ies), I created a 48 fps sequence so every frame of the source appears

3 times. I export it via after effects to an image sequence so we'll get

a 48fps DCP. I assume that 48fps DCPs are supported by much more cinemas

than DPCs with 16 fps, but I'll try out this option, too.

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Jun 03, 2015 0
Community Beginner ,
Sep 30, 2015

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Bummer! The solution with exporting via After Effects doesn't take the titles of the premiere project.

So please, Adobe, implement a plugin or an option to choose framerates "like project" or "custom frame rate" - as they are already available when you select f4v or flv as exporting format (unfortunately, these two formats are no use for post production).

Please do it quick, otherwise I'll need to recut the whole project on another software again...;/

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Sep 30, 2015 0
minerios LATEST
New Here ,
Aug 30, 2020

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Besides just achieving an effect look on your footage you can actually input custom framerates, but only if you have the AfterCodecs plugin as you can see in this article here by its developers: http://www.autokroma.com/blog/How-to-Export-Custom-Framerates-PPro-AME/

It is a neat solution for filling gaps on the Adobe's built in exporters.

Hope this helps!

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Aug 30, 2020 0