Display color management vs Apple prores 422 HQ

Explorer ,
Dec 24, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Hi,

 

I'm trying to export my video in Apple prores 422 HQ but my colors come out oversaturated and with more contrast. I googled a bit and found out there's an option in preferences -> general; 'display color management'.

When I turn this on I get the oversaturated effect I'm trying to prevent in the export, so I turn it off.

Now I can't figure out how to turn the color management off upon exporting.

 

I'm working on windows 10 with Premiere Pro 14.0

 

Thanks in advance,

Melle

TOPICS
Editing, Error or problem, Export, Formats

Views

54

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more

Display color management vs Apple prores 422 HQ

Explorer ,
Dec 24, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Hi,

 

I'm trying to export my video in Apple prores 422 HQ but my colors come out oversaturated and with more contrast. I googled a bit and found out there's an option in preferences -> general; 'display color management'.

When I turn this on I get the oversaturated effect I'm trying to prevent in the export, so I turn it off.

Now I can't figure out how to turn the color management off upon exporting.

 

I'm working on windows 10 with Premiere Pro 14.0

 

Thanks in advance,

Melle

TOPICS
Editing, Error or problem, Export, Formats

Views

55

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Dec 24, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Dec 24, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Color management is complicated and completely broken across devices, apps, and platforms. So.

 

Display Color Management is an option in the preferences to tell Premiere to look at the ICC profile of the monitor and remap internal calculations so it displays a (hopefully) more correct image in the internal monitors, Source, Program, and Reference. Within Premiere, of course.

 

It makes no difference whatever to images outside of Premiere, as Premiere cannot change the operation of the OS and other apps.

 

If you're on a Mac with a Retina monitor, well ... Apple chose to mis-apply the Rec709 standard for some reason. But of course, Apple doth always need to be "different".

 

So their ColorSync utility applies only the first of two required transform functions, the scene-referred transform. ColorSync does not apply the also required second transform, the display transform funtion. Instead, they apply what they call "sRGB gamma" ... an odd concept ... resulting in a gamma sort of similar to but not exactly like a gamma 1.96 curve.

 

Rec.709, properly applied, is 2.4 gamma in most cicumstances, 2.2 occasionally.

 

The 1.96 of the Mac system lifts shadows quite a bit, and also something about the ColorSync application also gives visually lower saturation for many users. And there's no easy one-size-fits-all fix.

 

You should use the Display Color Management option within Premiere to more correctly see your pixels. For export you have two choices, neither perfect.

 

First, export without any applied LUT in that export. The file will be technically correct, will display mostly sort of correctly on most PCs and all systems with fully correct color managment for Rec.709 video: sRGB color space, Rec.709 profile, D65 white point, gamma 2.4, 100 nits brightness.

 

However, on many Macs with Retina monitors, it will look a bit light in the shadows and low in saturation compared to how you viewed it inside Premiere.

 

The other option is to apply the gamma correction LUT that Adobe has made available during the export. There's a tab in the Export dialog for doing things like applying LUTs on export. Doing so will make it look mostly the same outside of Premiere on that system as it looked inside Premiere.

 

However, this will make the file appear with crushed blacks and over-saturated on many PCs and all systems with correct color management. Not, PC/Android screens are what, 85% of US/Europe, and higher elsewhere?

 

Yea, it's a problem that no colorist can solve either. And they've got systems where they've spent more on monitors than you've spent on your last car, and more in calibration gear & software than your computer cost.

 

For most purposes, all you can do is correct color on the most correct screen/system you can afford. Then let it go, as out in the Wild, you have no control. But if you do things as close to the Rec.709 standard as you can, your material will look ... on any other screen ... relatively to that screen ... like other pro produced material on that screen.

 

That's what colorists do with everything they ever grade. It's all they can do.

 

Neilc

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Dec 24, 2020 0