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Exports are desaturated

New Here ,
Sep 10, 2020

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Whenever I export video the colours always come out all wrong, and I'm losing probably 10-20% of the saturation. 

 

The first image is the screenshot from premier, and the latter is after it's been exported. 

 

I have attempted all of the following: 

-Changed the nvidia graphics settings to have a full dynamic range

-exported with different formats

-played in windows media player and vlc media player

-played back on different devices

 

But always get the same outcome. Can anyone help me with this? I'm on a PC. 

 

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Exports are desaturated

New Here ,
Sep 10, 2020

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Whenever I export video the colours always come out all wrong, and I'm losing probably 10-20% of the saturation. 

 

The first image is the screenshot from premier, and the latter is after it's been exported. 

 

I have attempted all of the following: 

-Changed the nvidia graphics settings to have a full dynamic range

-exported with different formats

-played in windows media player and vlc media player

-played back on different devices

 

But always get the same outcome. Can anyone help me with this? I'm on a PC. 

 

timage1.PNG

timage2.PNG

Topics

Editing, Export

Views

63

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 10, 2020

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You've run into the massive rabbit hole of color management in video production and display. Sorry, there's no easy way out ... !

 

First, do NOT mess with things like setting up the GPU controls for "full range" as that is WRONG. All video except for a very few format/codecs that are RGB/4:4:4:4 is "legal range". Your media ain't full range.

 

What's the difference? The way it's encoded, not the number of actual 'levels' to the file or screen. Legal/video range media and full-range media will both be displayed 0-255/0-1040 (depending on bit-depth) on any "normal" screen with appropriate settings.

 

But if you change the screen to show everything in 'full', then it will over crush the darks and blow out (clip) the whites on any normal Rec.709 media displayed. Not good.

 

So ... what monitor are you using, how is it set for color, and what calibration have you done with a puck/software setup like the i1 Pro Display from Xrite? What ICC profile is Windows using? What are you using to determine how the output looks? What does it look like brought back into Premiere?

 

Are you setting the "Display color management" option to on in the Preferences?

 

And past that, I give some resources down below.

 

Neil

 

“Why does my footage look darker”

 

How Display Color Management in Premiere Works by Jarle Leirpoll.

 

Color Management for Video Editors by Jonny Elwyn

 

Why Master on a Calibrated Display? LightIllusion.com/ Steve Shaw

 

And finally, a piece by myself (linked from the Jonny Elwin blog above) extensively covering Premiere's color managment pipelines, over at MixingLight.com ( a pro colorist's teaching website) that is outside their paywall, free for anyone to view:

Finishing at the Highest Possible Quality in Premiere Pro

 

 

 

 

 

 

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New Here ,
Sep 10, 2020

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Hi Neil,

 

Okay, wow! Did not expect this query to require such a technical response. I figured because the colours were washed out when it was exported in different formats and displayed on different screens, it was to do with Premier itself not exporting properly. I've also checked the export in different monitors and still get the same issue. 

 

I just clicked on Enable Display Colour Management, and now everything's yellow! You are not wrong that this is a total rabbit hole...!

 

I also have done zero colour calibration (don't know what that is), nor do I know the ICC profile. 

 

You're going to have to break this down significantly, I'm only a hobbyist at the moment trying to learn the software!

 

 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 10, 2020

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Basic video color management information ... which should be everywhere, but ain't.

 

Nearly all video media is recorded as Rec.709 media. That's a long-time standard. Between the written standards and pro broadcast delivery expectations, such media is to be used on systems with these display specs:

 

  • Video sRGB color primaries.
  • Rec.709 profile both for the camera transform function (think gamma curve) and the display transform function (typically Bt.1886).
  • Display gamma for processing of 2.4 in a semi-darkened room, 2.2 in a bright room.
  • Monitor brightness of 100 nits.

 

Premiere is hard-coded to be used on computer systems built to those specs. If you've got that, it's great. If you don't ... well, thar be dragons, matey! Um ... yea.

 

Most monitors do not come close to the above even when using their Rec.709 options, if they've got one. They will either do so at the monitor's full brightness which can be anywhere from 160nits to 400+ nits these days, or ... they'll have a "Rec.709" or "Dark mode" setting which is maybe 80 nits brightness. And I've not heard of a monitor that says it comes with dead-on Rec.709 profile actually even coming that close with a full-on test with say Lightspace color management/profiling app.

 

Windows isn't particularly fussy about adiding by any visual standards. So you have to set this up some yourself. And that's where using the puck/software profiling setup saves your bacon. If you run a good calibration with i1 Display Pro and set that ICC profile for the monitor, in a semi-darkened room, you'll get close enough to 'accurate' to get by on quite nicely.

 

Outside of that, it's ... dicey. Very, very dicey.

 

Now ... also understand ... nearly every video player and browser and streaming service will do it's own thing to "enhance the viewing experience" ... meaning mess with things so they're nowhere near "standards". Some browsers may work decently on say Windows but not so well on a Mac, with its very unique color utility. Others ... the reverse. Some swear by VLC and Potplayer, some prefer one or the other. On some systems QuickTime player is ok, on others, it's a complete joke.

 

The coming of HDR media is only helping things get murky, and it's doubtful at the moment that you're running any actual full-on HDR media. So we'll skip that for now.

 

Do read through now and watch the things I've listed in the first post. Some things won't make sense at first, but after reading/watching through they'll start to gel in your brain.

 

As the user, this is something you need to know enough about to 'fix' for yourself. And you can.

 

Neil

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 10, 2020

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Neil is definitely the color expert. One tip I want to throw in is that it can be useful to re-import your video and check the color back inside Premiere. There may always be some color change based on your export codec/compression settings, but it shouldn't be drastic.

Another thing to try these days with the new hardware acceleration is to use Software Encoding for h264/HEVC exports rather than Software Encoding. I've seen it fix a few encoding issues for people. Maybe not the answer - but worth a try. (If you've tried a different codec, like a mastering codec, then that would have been the equivalent of doing this.)

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