interpret footage: no colourspace or LUT all grey

Community Beginner ,
Jan 21, 2021

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Hi, I am using mainly Canon R5, R, and RP. Whatever I import, mp4, mp4 PQ, raw, or mp4 clog, when I try to set the colourspace in "interpret footage", all the entries for this are greyed, thus, not possible to set any input LUT. 

Does anyone has an idea, why premiere (14.8) seems not to recognize the canon video files correctly including the colourspace used?

many thanks!

 

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Formats, How to, User interface or workspaces

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 21, 2021

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That very new setting is in the first version out with it. And currently, the only two codecs they have that work with that Modify/Interpret Footage color space settings (as they've published about) are ProRes and Sony XAVC-Intra. As time goes by, they'll be adding more codecs to the list.

 

So you would need to still set a working color space in the Timeline sequence settings (also a brand spanking new control) and then use the Lumetri panel for any input LUTs. Typically you can do that using the Master Clip tab, so the input LUT settings are applied to the clip any time it's used in that project.

 

I do recommend using the Creative tab drop-down in Lumetri for input/tech LUTs, as those LUTs are built using "ideal" exposure/color-balance/contrast setups, and field media is never created under ideal situations. Therefore to get the LUT performing as expected one normally needs to apply the LUT, but do a bit of trimming for exposure/contrast/sat before the LUT to ensure the curves fall at the correct places and nothing is clipped/crushed.

 

So ... apply LUT in the Creative tab, then use Basic tab (processed before Creative tab) to do your trims.

 

And ... NEVER ever ever add LUTs into the Program/package files location. They have a chart for where we users are supposed to add LUTs, which then appear in the appropriate drop-down lists. But I'm migrating to a new computer and don't have all my links stuff on here yet, so I can't provide a copy of the chart.

 

Neil

 

Neil

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ophth1 AUTHOR
Community Beginner ,
Jan 21, 2021

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ok understood. Interestingly, this new setting colourspace is shown and enabled in stills, that's why I was wondering...

About the input LUTs: We usually put them in an adjustement layer above the clips. Is this of disadvantage in comparison to what you suggested in the creative tab? The advantage is that you can apply this way to all clips at the same time...

many thanks!

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 22, 2021

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Interesting that the Modify/Interpret-color space option is active for stills. From my understanding, it really shouldn't be, as they aren't ProRes or Sony XAVC-Intra codecs. Kinda funny then.

 

Process order in Premiere: top to bottom in the ECP layer stack. Within each instance of Lumetri, top to bottom except in the Curves tab, where all the HSL curves are in parallel after the RGB curve.

 

After V1 is processed, then any affecting tracks above are processed in ascending order. So whatever is applied with an AL in V2 is next, in V3 after than, on up. Within any track of course, it's top down in the ECP for that track.

 

So ... putting the tech LUT on an AL means it is being applied after all work done on the clip itself in V1, and everything you do on the original clip is essentially 'trimming' that clip through the normalization LUT. Not "wrong" necessarily, and certainly easy to control across clips.

 

And in effect, it's a way to enforce a sort of "working space" for that group of clips. Might be a pretty useful tool for simple practical get the work out reasons.

 

Neil

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