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Jpg with color change at premiere 2020

New Here ,
May 19, 2020

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Friends good afternoon, I am facing a problem in Premiere, when importing photos already treated in LR Classic , Premiere changes some characteristics of the photos, for example up shadows, changes the black and white adjustment , Among other things. Has anyone been through something like this?

 

I'm uploading two images as an example, the slide (it would be the image translated in LR) and the export is the image exported by Premiere

Slide imageSlide image

Export ImageExport Image

 

 

 

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Error or problem, Export, Import

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Jpg with color change at premiere 2020

New Here ,
May 19, 2020

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Friends good afternoon, I am facing a problem in Premiere, when importing photos already treated in LR Classic , Premiere changes some characteristics of the photos, for example up shadows, changes the black and white adjustment , Among other things. Has anyone been through something like this?

 

I'm uploading two images as an example, the slide (it would be the image translated in LR) and the export is the image exported by Premiere

Slide imageSlide image

Export ImageExport Image

 

 

 

Topics

Error or problem, Export, Import

Views

617

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Enthusiast ,
May 19, 2020

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Well one thing to keep in mind is that Premiere works in a Rec 709 environment. Any items you import into Premiere it assumes to be Rec 709, the timeline is Rec 709, and your exports are (usually) Rec 709 (unless you're using a codec that can specify otherwise.)

 

Starting with variation in luminance, this is probably due to the gamma differences between sRGB (which I'm guessing your photo is) and Rec 709. The following example may not be 1:1 as to what happened, but just to give you a sense of what CAN happen:

  • Your still image is originally sRGB (gamma 2.2)
  • Premiere has assumed it to be Rec 709 (Gamma 2.4) as this is default behavior
  • You export a Rec 709 video
  • You watch it in an environment which forces it to be seen in sRGB (for example YouTube), now gamma has shifted up one extra time from 2.4 to 2.2, adjusting the luminance values a bit further than you expected.

 

This opens up a big ol' topic on color management and the unfortunately somewhat hopelessness of trying to get everything to look the same everywhere which I will not get into now for everyone's sake. That said if you really want to have a photo match Premiere's environment, send your raw image to Photoshop and set the color space of the document to Rec 709.

 

As for the poorer gradiation, I am guessing this is because your still image has a higher bit-depth compared to your Premiere export (and resulting JPEG capture) which are likely both 8-bit, depending on your export settings. Unavoidable if you are going down to 8-bit at the end of the day, but you can improve it a bit by checking "Render at Maximum Depth" in Premiere's export settings. Your end result will still be 8-bit if encoding an 8bit codec, but it will be rendered out at its full depth before doing so and that should help improve it a bit.

 

PS. Great shot by the way!

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New Here ,
May 19, 2020

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thanks for the help, can you tell me how can i leave a standard profile for LR and PR (if this is possible)

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awh11 LATEST
Enthusiast ,
May 19, 2020

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Well for Premiere there really unfortunately isn't an option. Anything brought into Premiere is treated as Rec 709, and your timeline is Rec 709. No choice there.

 

You can however opt to have Premiere manage your display or not. If you have Display management enabled, Premiere will make your video look as accurate as possible to what it will look like in Rec 709. If you have display management is turned off, then you'll be seeing your footage in the display profile your monitor is set to. For PCs this is often times sRGB, and many Apple displays use P3-D65 (Display P3), but you'd have to check with your OS specifically.

 

As R_Neil_Haugen points out, Lightroom Classic works in a ProPhoto RGB space in Develop (and Adobe RGB in preview). There also is no option to change this as far as I'm aware. While you can designate the color space of exports in export settings I don't believe Rec 709 is an option though, and even if it were you're not actually editing the photo in that space.

 

That's why if you want to see your image 1:1 between photo editing and Premiere you'd want to send your photo to Photoshop and set the document space to Rec 709. Not only will this let you export a Rec 709 copy of the image (or just go ahead and import the .PSD into Premiere) but Photoshop will also manage your display to Rec 709. Now you've created a scenario where what you see in editing in PS is what you'll see in Premiere with display management turned on.

 

Just don't drive yourself crazy, as Neil and I pointed out you can't have the image look the same for everyone. What appears slightly brighter on YouTube on a PC monitor may look closer to your original on a phone that uses a saturation and contrast boosting display. However if you wanted to go the extra step to at least ensure that your image you're editing will match Premiere's work space (and more power to you), using Photoshop to work in a Rec 709 document and export a Rec 709 image is an option.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
May 19, 2020

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awh11 has a great answer ... I'll just add that Lightroom tends to work in a modified version of the ProPhoto color space, a bit wider gamut than the video sRGB that Premiere works in to comply with the Rec.709 broadcast standards. So that image directly from Lightroom could be in a wider gamut.

 

When you select the Jpeg option to export from Lightroom, make sure that in the file settings you specify the sRGB color space, as that is very close to a Rec.709 file. And to get closer, I do think if you take the file to Photoshop from Lightroom, you could specify even Rec.709 for the output color.

 

But as awh11 noted, color management is not nearly as exact as many users assume. No two devices will show exactly the same color, even side-by-side.

 

Neil

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