Lumetri colors become less saturated after export

New Here ,
Aug 30, 2020

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After I apply Lumetri Colors onto my clip and export the file, the product will always appear less saturated, or the tint will be slightly off, compared to what I've be seeing in the preview window on Premiere. Is there a particular setting I need to click to ensure the exported files will reflect exactly what I've been seeing on the Premiere Pro preview window?

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Editing, Effects and Titles, Export, How to

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1 Correct Answer

Adobe Community Professional , Aug 30, 2020
R Neil Haugen Adobe Community Professional , Aug 30, 2020
This is a typical issue with improper color management on the computer system. So ... what's your OS, and what are you doing for color management, have you calibrated your monitor with a puck/software system like the i1 Pro Display, what are you viewing the export in, and what does it look like when you re-import into Premiere?   If you reimport into Premiere and it looks the same as before export ... it's definitely the color management outside of Premiere.   There is the option for Display Col...

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 30, 2020

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This is a typical issue with improper color management on the computer system. So ... what's your OS, and what are you doing for color management, have you calibrated your monitor with a puck/software system like the i1 Pro Display, what are you viewing the export in, and what does it look like when you re-import into Premiere?

 

If you reimport into Premiere and it looks the same as before export ... it's definitely the color management outside of Premiere.

 

There is the option for Display Color Management, which you probably need to have checked in the Preferences/General tab. Premiere is hard-wired to assume anything it's used on is setup for pro broadcast standards: video sRGB primaries, D65 white point, Rec.709 profile, gamma 2.4, 100 nits monitor brightness in a semi-darkened room. If that ain't your system, the Display Color Management option tells it to look at your monitor's ICC profile in the OS settings, and adapt what you see inside Premiere to what the monitor is capable of showing, in an attempt to get as close as possible to a proper image.

 

But that can only help inside Premiere. Outside ... whatever your system does, and whatever each browser/player/app does, is outside of Premiere's control. And every flipping app/gear seems to do its own thing rather than play by the standards.

 

There's a long thread on this ... started by then-color engineer Francis Crossman (now co-product manager).

Why does my color look different?

 

An explanation by Jarle Leirpoll of the Premiere color management options.

Jarle’s Article on Premiere Color Management

 

Here's a piece by noted color management expert Steve Shaw who's company provides much of the color management software for pro colorists. It does both general and some commments particular to the Macs with Retina monitors.

Why Master On A Calibrated Display?

 

A piece by noted editor/blogger Jonny Elwyn.

Color Management for Video Editors

 

And finally, a tutorial by moi over on MixingLight.com, covering Premiere Pro's color management. This is referenced and included in Jonny's blog above. This is free, outside the MixingLight paywall. MixingLight is a pro colorist's subscription website, and I 'cover' color managemen and correction techniques in Premiere Pro over there. (Yea, it's primarily a Resolve-color correction group, with some Baselight and Avid work of course.)

How Do You Finish at the Highest Possible Quality in Premiere Pro CC?

 

That should give you enough material to get you well and truly down the CM rabbit hole ...

 

Neil

 

 

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New Here ,
Sep 07, 2020

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The first link you posted has helped with the Gamma Compensation LUT. Thank you so much!

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 07, 2020

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Just be aware ... you may have "fixed" the file on your system, but ... definitely have made it worse for others. It may be ok for web work (though again, many systems will see it worse for that LUT use) ... but not ok for broadcast.

 

Neil

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