Organizing Large, Monthly Projects

Explorer ,
Mar 09, 2021 Mar 09, 2021

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I'm trying to see if there are any tutorials or best practices guides for organizing large Premiere Pro projects. The project I'm working on has one video/sequence per month. Each monthly sequence uses a variety of graphics, b-roll videos, raw video of a speaker, After Effects comps, etc. After a year though, the project is VERY large, and takes a long time to load. I also tend to use one long After Effects comp per monthly sequence. But I'm wondering if maybe there would be a better way to organize that? Any ideas? 

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Editing, Effects and Titles, How to, Import

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 09, 2021 Mar 09, 2021

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You should be opening multiple separate project files, organized in folders, in order to efficiently manage large projects. You may want to create folders by month, by year, or even by week, it just depends on your specific workflow. 

 

Whether you have one project with 10 comps or 10 projects with one comp each, the footage takes up the same amount of space, but 10 separate projects with only the footage imported that each individual comp needs will load much more quickly than one project with 10 comps and every piece of footage.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 09, 2021 Mar 09, 2021

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The newish Productions process is what you should be doing. Period.

 

It's a very different organizational model, and takes a bit of learning and re-thinking. Maybe an hours worth.

 

It's built on two concepts: organizing the entire Production on disc as well as within PrPro, and second, breaking up the work into a series of very small Pr project files.

 

So you tell PrPro to create a New Production, and it creates a top-level folder on disc named and placed as you specify.

 

In that Production folder in PrPro, you right-click, Create Folder, and build your organizational structure. Unlike bins, which are theoretical locations, these are actual folders on disc. Their documents on it suggest thinking of using folders instead of the bins you would have used before.

 

Within the appropriate folders, you right-click New Project. And they state, think of project files as the 'final' bins that stored assets. So you might have a Media subfolder, with project files for Day 1, Day 2, Day 3 shoot media. Or maybe you have only one project file with three bins in it.

 

And of course, you have a separate folder and project structure for sequences. You do NOT store media in Sequence projects.

 

The reason for breaking into a lot of small project files is that for any project file, PrPro must load all meta information for all media, data and sequences into RAM/cache files. With one large project file, that's a TON of data.

 

But within a production, PrPro can reference the meta for specific assets used in a sequence from their particular storage project file, without needing to load the entire meta of the Production to RAM/cache. It makes working with massive projects a lot easier on your machine.

 

And for those of us in small shops, with recurrent projects and/or clients, b-roll and sound libraries and such, making a folder tree for each client means you can access and use ALL of your presets, assets, templates, and such in any project for any client for the whole year.

 

Quickly and easily access and reuse everything. No duplicated assets, no mangled messed up project files with things accidentally added that don't belong ... and it's how I suggest most small shops run their year of work.

 

When I get to the shop, I'll add a post with a couple of their documents on how to do this.

 

Neil

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