Playback - big problems!

New Here ,
Sep 20, 2020

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I am completely new to Premiere, and also just getting started with a new computer. The 45-second sequence I have edited so far is playing back missing frames, juddering etc etc during the shots that have effects applied. Impossible to get a realistic feel of how the piece is flowing.  The effects are pretty basic - such as  reverse motion - but nothing too exacting, I'd have thought.

 

The line above the timeline is yellow and I've set Playback Resolution in the Program Monitor to 1/4.

 

Why is this please?  Am I missing something or is the spec of my computer not up to the job?

 

Processor is a AMD Ryzen 7 eight-core CPU 3.9GHz - 4.5GHz/36MB

RAM is 32GB Corsair Vengeance DDR4 3000MHz

Graphics Card is 6GB Nvidia Geforce RTX 2060

Media is on a 1TB Samsung SSD

 

Any assistance woulds be most welcome!

Tim

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Editing, Performance

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 20, 2020

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The media you're using is crucial, especially if you're reversing the play of a clip. If that's long-GOP media, as most H264/mp4 and some mov are, I would expect potential issues.

 

So ... what's the media, and what exactly are you doing in the sequence?

 

Neil

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Tim_1945 AUTHOR
New Here ,
Sep 27, 2020

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The media codec is  mp42 (mp42/avc1)

 

What I'm doing is reversing one clip, and a section with two video layers. Each time PP struggles to play the sections - missing chunks, juddering etc etc.

 

Does that help to shed light on the problem?

Thanks!

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 28, 2020

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I would suggest making sure you've got a good intermediate format/codec selected in the Sequence settings for preview codec. Something like probably ProRe 422LT. The select those clips on the timline, do a render & replace.

 

Neil

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Tim_1945 AUTHOR
New Here ,
Sep 29, 2020

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Thanks Neil,

For a newbie, can you explain what you mean by an "Intermediate format/codec" please? 

Tim

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 29, 2020

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Digital intermediate formats are those which maintain visual quality at lossless or near-lossless level through several generations. They are used for working processes through the editing/color/fx pipeline. Not uncommonly, enough effects are applied to a clip/s that it is better for total project management to 'bake' the effects in so you can move on to the next major step.

 

Such as say needing Warp, time-ramping and color correction on a clip. For that, probably do the Warp and render/replace, then time-ramp or color, "nest" the clip and do the other step.

 

Neil

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Tim_1945 AUTHOR
New Here ,
Sep 30, 2020

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Thanks for this Neil! As this workflow is all a million miles away from what I've been used to doing (TV News pieces), can I pick your brains a little more?

 

1. Earlier in the thread you mentioned "...making sure you've got a good intermediate format/codec selected in the Sequence settings for preview codec."  

When I open Sequence Settings, there is a section called  Video Previews with options to choose from various formats. Is that what you are referring to? What exactly does Video Previews do?

 

2. Are you suggesting ProRes 422LT for the Video Previews panel in Sequence settings? Or Render & Replace? Or both?

 

3. Finally(!)  Quoting again: "...probably do the Warp and render/replace, then time-ramp or color, "nest" the clip and do the other step."  Could you elaborate a little - Are you suggesting multiple Render & Replace steps? For what reason? What do you mean by "nesting" the clip?

 

Thank you again,

Tim

 

 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 30, 2020

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1) Video Previews is where you have your playback previews set. There's a useful option there, that if you have those set to the format/codec you will be using for export, and it's an intraframe format, then you can export with the "use previews" option checked, and any place you'd had Premiere create previews it will use those without needing time to re-encode.

 

In intraframe codec has each frame as a complete frame, simply compressed. This is opposed to an interframe codec, where there are complete "i-frames" every 9-30 frames, and in between are partial frames and matrix sets. The matrix sets are data of the pixels that 1) have changed since the last i-frame 2) will change before the next i-frame, or now 3) BOTH. So for encoding any interframe format/codec, it requires the computer to create the i-frames around that area and store them to RAM, then compute all the between-frames.

 

Interframe format/codecs are called long-GOP (group of pictures) and are typically H.264/H.265 and some mov forms.

 

Render & Replace is a different option, but I normally have my preview and R&R options set to the same format/codec for reasons that seem pretty obvious ... to me at least! All though they weren't until I had the differences of things as above explained to me.

 

2) It sounded like from the project you're working and being a noob that ProResLT would be an adequate quality for the task. ProRes, Cineform, and DNxHD/R are the three main "DI" and delivery formats for much pro work where quality is of dire concern. Any of them can work well, and they all have variuos levels of 'quality' which basically is dependent on the bitrate for that level. Other than the uppermost levels where RGB and 12-bit become part of the codec stats.

 

The second part is answered in 1) above.

 

3) Warp, time-shifting and color are all three very heavy effects. There are some monster computers that may be able to handle all three done to a clip without preview/R&R/nesting, but ... I don't assume anyone has one. Therefore to get playback and encoding times in control, you have to break up the workload. Nesting causes Premiere to separate tasks out a bit, and I don't have a clue why, but ... it works.

 

Pick the one effect that you can finish in one step so you won't need to change it. Typically, that's really Warp. So apply Warp and do an R&R to replace the clip used on the timeline with a full-on quality clip that is fully stabilized.

 

Then pick either color or time next ... do that, then right-click the clip and select "nest".  It turns green on the sequence. Then to the nested clip on the sequence apply the other effect.

 

For order, which is the effect more likely to be 'stable' and which more likely to need further tweaking? Do the more stable option first, the one you expect to tweak more later. Often, that means doing time-shifting first, nesting, then applying color as you not only need to color correct the clip to something close to neutral, you will need to then modify it to match the clips before/after it. Often late in the processing chain.

 

Neil

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Tim_1945 AUTHOR
New Here ,
Sep 30, 2020

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Thanks so much Neil. You've been incredibly helpful!

Tim

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Advocate ,
Sep 20, 2020

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might be usb speed between media and cpu, etc. If it's an external drive start over and copy the stuff to internal ssd or hd. That eliminates at least one variable. Then it's up to your source ( 4k , 8k ? ) and your hardware. You have to eleminate stuff like a scientist.... get to the solution.

🙂

good luck

 

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Advocate ,
Sep 30, 2020

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I'm learning a lot. Thank you.

===

Media is on a 1TB Samsung SSD

=========

Is that an external drive hooked up by USB ?

It may be that your cache, previews, sound, graphics, etc... you're whole PROJECT... is on an external drive that 

A) is too slow to process ANYTHING very well

note: GOP will be harder on CPU once it gets there while intermediate will not be as hard.

B) IF YOU CHOOSE PROXY ( new preview codec that gets cached back to your slow drive ) it will increase the byte count of the files ( less compressed ) and eventually you'll just run out of space. 1 TB is not much these days for 4k and 8k etc.

 

I don't know why this is being ignored to begin with ( the source facts and ignorance of what 'effects' actually have to do ( like tweening and ever reversing a clip ).

 

But meanwhile I can get the benefit of professor Neil's classroom ! How cool is THAT ?? 

( hehe, Neil, just pulling your leg... I do love what you teach ! )

 

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Tim_1945 AUTHOR
New Here ,
Sep 30, 2020

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The Samsung 1TB drive is internal within the computer.  Thanks for your thoughts too!

Tim

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 30, 2020

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Can you enable Window's Task Manager? Check to see if the HD, RAM, GPU or CPU or getting pegged at 100%. Below is an example of the statistics.

https://youtu.be/l8qte40pykI

I have done a few videos about Intel's Quick Sync but you can now use your GPU for rendering H.264/H.265 with the newest version of Premiere Pro.Monetized li...

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Tim_1945 AUTHOR
New Here ,
Sep 30, 2020

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Thanks Andy, I'll try that.

Tim

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 01, 2020

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No problem. We need to see what is going on under the hood of your computer.

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