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Pr CS5 - List of supported CUDA Cards

Advisor ,
Apr 01, 2010 Apr 01, 2010

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Adobe is working on a playback and rendering engine for Adobe Premiere Pro called the Mercury Playback Engine. This new engine is NVIDIA® GPU-accelerated, 64-bit native, and architected for the future. Native 64-bit support enables you to work more fluidly on HD and higher resolution projects, and GPU acceleration speeds effects processing and rendering.

The Mercury Playback Engine offers these benefits:

  • Open projects faster, refine effects-rich HD and higher resolution sequences in real time, enjoy smooth scrubbing, and play back complex projects without rendering.
  • See results instantly when applying multiple color corrections and effects across many video layers.
  • Work in real time on complex timelines and long-form projects with thousands of clips — whether your project is SD, HD, 2K, 4K, or beyond.

Ensure your system is ready to take advantage of the Mercury Playback Engine in a future version of Adobe Premiere Pro. The Mercury Playback Engine works hand-in-hand with NVIDIA® CUDA™ technology to give you amazingly fluid, real-time performance. See it in action

* PR CS5 supports the following list of CUDA cards:

285.jpgGeForce GTX 285Windows and MAC
3800.jpgQuadro FX 3800Windows
4800.jpgQuadro FX 4800Windows and MAC
5800.jpgQuadro FX 5800Windows
quadrocx.jpgQuadro CXWindows

More hardware details:

http://www.adobe.com/products/premiere/systemreqs/

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correct answers 1 Correct Answer

Adobe Employee , Apr 15, 2010 Apr 15, 2010
Now that the launch is done and this information is all public, I'm going to summarize all the bits of information that have been floating around into one distilled post:The Mercury playback engine comprises of 3 areas (our chief weapons are surprise, surprise and fear...  nevermind...):- 64 bit support, and better memory management / frame cache management / sharing between the Adobe apps (ie Premiere and After Effects & the Media Encoder have a notion of shared memory now, and are aware of how...

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New Here ,
Apr 12, 2010 Apr 12, 2010

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"Certfied" Cuda cards...What does this mean?

The list of Cuda compatible cards is long.

What about the GTX 250, 260, 280 models?  These models are very close in terms of specs to the GTX 285.

Can the list be that rigid?  I hope not.  The GTX 260 can be had for $160.

The other side of the spectrum is the GTX 470 and 480.  The GTX 470 is at the same price range as the GTX 285.

Someone!.....HHHHEEELLLPPP!  

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LEGEND ,
Apr 12, 2010 Apr 12, 2010

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It is that rigid. Only certified cards are capable of enabling MPE hardware rendering. All other cards are not supported AFAIK.

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New Here ,
Apr 12, 2010 Apr 12, 2010

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The bigger question is why the GTX 285 verus GTX 470 or 480 at launch considering the similar price point?

Nvidia would have gotten a huge boost in Fermi sales and Adobe would have gotten a lot more performance/$$$ ratio on the low end.

I know...The Fermi cards just came out but I'm sure they had access many months ago.

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LEGEND ,
Apr 12, 2010 Apr 12, 2010

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In addition to what Curt mentioned, you have to realize that a development cycle for a new version takes around 17 months (+1 if you take the vacation time into account, but the whole devlopment team deserves that, I think). The Fermi cards were only announced a couple of weeks ago, so what time did Adobe have to test them? They have announced that support for the GTX-480 Fermi card will be available in Q3. Whether further cards will be supported is 'under investigation', so the future will tell.

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New Here ,
Apr 12, 2010 Apr 12, 2010

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So as someone who has an NVIDA GeForce GT220 - does this mean that I will not be able to run Premiere CS5 at all? Or is there another playback option for those of us who can't splash out even more money on a new graphics card?

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New Here ,
Apr 12, 2010 Apr 12, 2010

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It will work...You just can't take advantage of the Mercury accelaration.

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New Here ,
Apr 12, 2010 Apr 12, 2010

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Thanks, I guess that's some consolation for us still in the stone age

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Advisor ,
Apr 12, 2010 Apr 12, 2010

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To clarify a a bit more; the Mercury Playback Engine (MPE) is a combination of SW and GPU.  So, even if you dont have a supported graphics card you will see improved performance.  The compatible cuda card adds significant improvement on top of that.

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New Here ,
Apr 12, 2010 Apr 12, 2010

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It stands to reason that if CUDA architecture is supported in CS5, that all CUDA enabled GPU's should be able to take advantage of Mercury to one level or another.  The only difference between the GTX 285 and ALL the other CUDA enabled cards (as it relates to CUDA) are the amount of processing cores...that's it.  I have a GTS 250 and it works splendidly with Cyberlink Espresso, a CUDA enabled transcoding program.  So, the results are great with a program that can take advantage of my card.  I just don't understand why Adobe can't write software that's takes advantage of cross-GPU architecture, and only supports one of the many cards that have the SAME architecture.  I was looking forward to upgrading my PRE8 to Premiere PRo CS5, but I don't think I want to upgrade my already powerful GPU for one program.

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LEGEND ,
Apr 12, 2010 Apr 12, 2010

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AFAIK only certified nVidia cards allow hardware acceleration to be turned on. It is disabled on non-certified cards. However, all video cards can use the software MPE, which results in significant performance gains, just not as much as with a certified card.

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New Here ,
Apr 12, 2010 Apr 12, 2010

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I wish someone from Adobe would chime in on this topic.

It boils down to "unofficial support" with any Cuda compatible card...YES or NO.

I don't think anyone of us know that answer.

Since I have a GTX 260, which is very close in specs to the 285, I'm wondering  what the net effect is if any.

This may take a few months to hash out.  In the mean time, I'm not making any moves.

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LEGEND ,
Apr 12, 2010 Apr 12, 2010

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As Curt said, there are ''Supported" cards, that allow hardware MPE support. If the card is not "supported", there is no support for hardware MPE rendering at MRQ. This may change in the future, but that is where it stands now.

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Participant ,
Apr 13, 2010 Apr 13, 2010

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Hi

I agree....also having the GTX260. It looks as if Nvidia and Adobe has made some kind of agreement, so one have to buy an expensive new Nvidia card to get the new mercury engine to run properly in Ppro CS5. I write this because I have read that fx. the GTX 260 is allmost similar to the Quadro CX - same chips etc. - but we can not expect either Adobe or Nvidia to give us customers presents - like making the mercury engine available to all CUDA enabled Nvidia cards....that does not make business - only happy customers....

But I can not wait for Adobe to support GTX260 in CS5. I need better performance right now editing AVCHD quicker and more smooth. Have had tons of issues the last year trying to get things running just reasonable with PPro CS4. I have i7 920 with 2 x SATA 1 TB disks and 12 GB RAM, Windows 7 Pro 64 bit and GTX 260 and in CS4 I can only preview AVCHD files without any kind of effects or tranisitions. Just a simple transition and PPro starts having problems playing back properly. CS4 crashes from time to time - not seriously - but it have to think a lot about almost everything some times....But there are no alternatives to Ppro unless you will spend a lot more money.

So I get stucked to PPro - and actually looks a bit forward to see what PPro CS5 can do...hope my AVCHD editting will be less frustrating. But it will certainly cost me some money and make Adobe and NVidia more happy than my bankaccount.

Anyway - what I am interested in knowing is how much difference are there between the cards supported when it comes to performance etc.? Is the Quadro CX worth buying instead of the Quadro FX3800? Or what about the FX4800? Is it so much better than the FX3800? I need more specific details and tests of how things works with these supported cards. It makes no sense that Adobe just writes that these cards are supported - we nedd to know how they perform too.

I can only see the technical details about the cards - but there are no information anywhere about how the cards perform compared to each other - when it comes to playback, rendering speed etc. in PPro CS5?

Adobe and Nvidia must have done some tests? Everytime we see how great the new Mercury engine works it is showed on a high class system with Quadro CX. But what if we showed the same work on a medium class system - say i7 920 with 8-12 GB ram and a GTX 285? Or is it not worth showing anyone - does it perform better or worse or is it almost the same? No one knows....only Adobe and Nvidia. But they won´t tell?

Are there any BETA-tester out there who have had the oppertunity to try things out with different cards?

I am honestly being quite tired of upgrading all the time...spended 4000$ on a new system last year - this year have to spend the same - just on CS5 upgrade and a new videocard....boy, am I a happy customer?

😉
Morten

Denmark

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LEGEND ,
Apr 13, 2010 Apr 13, 2010

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Morten,

Just a little patience and tests will soon appear. Next month the final version will be available and test results will be published soon after. It makes no sense to publish test results based on beta builds.

Bill and I are already at work on the new PPBM5 benchmark, but have some patience. We can't test the validity of the test till we get our hands on the released product. Maybe the test will include actual footage (AVCHD, HDV, XDCAM-EX, Canon 7D and RED) and add a H.264 encode test as well, but it will be some time before it is available. Meanwhile watch for AnandTech, Tom's and similar sites to give you initial results.

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LEGEND ,
Apr 13, 2010 Apr 13, 2010

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My little dilemma is...

I am currently having a 64 bit machine built (for CS5)

Quadro FX4800 is very expensive down here in New Zealand.

My business partner is going to be in the U.S late this week and I have found a PNY QuadroFX4800 at a much better price near where she is going.

I think I will take a leap of faith (in ADOBE and NVIDIA)  and get her to buy it NOW.

I was going to hold off on the Quadro and use a 285 card I have lying around but.......

Someone make the call for me will ya guys..... 

BTW: I am not going to see the CS5 software for at least two months from now but I am going to sort the new machine properly  in anticipation of it.

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LEGEND ,
Apr 13, 2010 Apr 13, 2010

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Rumor has it that the Fermi cards leave the FX4800 in the dust at nearly a third of the price, but MPE support will only come in Q3. Personally I would wait a bit and see test results first.

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Community Beginner ,
Apr 13, 2010 Apr 13, 2010

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I was hoping that Nvidia's release of GeForce GTX 480 on the same day meant something.

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New Here ,
May 05, 2010 May 05, 2010

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Same here. I'm seriously thinking of moving to Sony just because of the poor response from Adobe. Been a customer for over 15 years! But some things must end, I need to work, not fix crashes and upgrade constantly. My version of P.P CS4 has never worked right, I use my old CS1 Suite and it out works CS4 64 bit in circles, because I work, not fix or try to figure out crashes/freezes/poor renders etc.

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Advisor ,
Apr 12, 2010 Apr 12, 2010

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That is your reasoning.   It is clearly not ADOBE'S reasoning and I suspect they know a bit more about the technology challanges involved to make this work well.

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New Here ,
Apr 13, 2010 Apr 13, 2010

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Did I just make a MAJOR blunder in ordering a GygabiteGTX 295 video card figuring that the extra processing power would give an "edge" with MPE

this card is non-returnable to Newegg.....please say this isnt so........and why didnt I read the small print before ordering!

steve

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New Here ,
Apr 13, 2010 Apr 13, 2010

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OH NO!

The 2 GPU GTX 295 is not listed...Only the GTX 285.

When did you buy the card?  Did you open it?  If not, I'd try to return.

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Most Valuable Participant ,
Apr 13, 2010 Apr 13, 2010

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He said... "this card is non-returnable to Newegg"

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Explorer ,
Apr 13, 2010 Apr 13, 2010

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Thanks but we're still confused.  For anyone to appropriate the "CUDA" tradename as Mercury does, there is the inherent implication that the engine will make use of the CUDA GPU architecture as it scales from the high-end to the low-end of the nVidia product line.  It would only be a predatory, anti-competitive behavior for nVidia and Adobe to collude with an agreement to specify which CUDA graphic card models "flick on" for Mercury, rather than to open up Mercury's GPU capabilities in accordance with the open-ended CUDA spec (e.g., the use of TMPGEnc Xpress and vReveal engages GPU acceleration for any CUDA model number).

Bottom line, nothing (including this thread) has answered to anyone's satisfaction the question of whether all CUDA-compatible nVidia GPU model numbers, OTHER THAN those few listed, have been "flicked off" from Mercury's playback engine to tap in for acceleration.  I am shocked to find this reality all-around so close to the release date, barring of course the collusion that I suspect.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 13, 2010 Apr 13, 2010

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nothing (including this thread) has answered to anyone's satisfaction the question of whether all CUDA-compatible nVidia GPU model numbers, OTHER THAN those few listed, have been "flicked off" from Mercury's playback engine to tap in for acceleration

The question has been answered.  The reality is that you don't like the answer.  Current cards that support CUDA acceleration in Premiere Pro CS5 are:

--Begin List--

--End of list--

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