Premiere Pro CS4 eats my C: drive in Vista Ultimate 64-bit SP1

Community Beginner ,
Apr 15, 2009 Apr 15, 2009

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I installed Premiere Pro CS4 this last weekend 11-12 April 2009.

I have a Quadcore 3.0GHz with 8Gb of RAM, a 150Gb C: drive fo rthe op sys Vista Ultimate 64-bit SP1 and programs, a 500Go 😧 drive for general data and a K: drive 2Tb RAID0 volume useable about 1.8Gb.

My C: drive was healthy after installation of Premiere Pro with tens of gigabytes free at least. Then I started experimenting with building projects. I put my files on a mix of the 😧 and K: drives especially the AVCHD video assets on the K:.

While importing these AVCHD assets I eventually got a message from Vista that the C: drive was full and I did a clean up and that gave approximetely 30Gb free, I went back to importing, in a couple of hours the 30Gb was gone, this can only be Premiere Pro CS4 eating the C: drive and never returning what it takes. This of course is a disaster precisely because it is my op sys drive and Vista will periodically want to make new restore points especially before applying downloaded updates from Microsoft. I ahve run also chkdsk and defragmenter with no effect. I think Premiere Pro is using some sort of secret work files on the C: drive somewhere and that they just accumulate, of course this would be a bug.

Support Center does not appear to let me open web support issues even though we are in the 90-day bug fix period and I have registered the product with the product key so that is another bug that gets in the way of fixing the first.

Any ideas please?

Thanks!

Peter.

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Community Beginner ,
Apr 15, 2009 Apr 15, 2009

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I presume that you have not assigned your project to a different drive--never put it on C-- and make sure you are capturing to one of your other drives. If it is anything other than how you have set up the project and the preferences, then you definitely have a unique problem, and I can't imagine what it would be.

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LEGEND ,
Apr 15, 2009 Apr 15, 2009

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Well it is not exactly a secret where they place files.  If you export from Premiere when AME comes up it tells you where Premiere has made a copy of your project files.  It is:  C:\\Users\Your_User_Name\AppData\Local\Temp.  But if you only have 30GB left on a 150 GB disk you must have everything execpt the kitchen sink load on your system.

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LEGEND ,
Apr 15, 2009 Apr 15, 2009

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Bill Gehrke wrote:

But if you only have 30GB left on a 150 GB disk you must have everything execpt the kitchen sink load on your system.

I think the kitchen sink is included in there as well.

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LEGEND ,
Apr 15, 2009 Apr 15, 2009

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Chances are you've got the scratch disks set up on C: in the Preferences.  If you change that to the 😧 drive, you should be OK.

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New Here ,
Apr 16, 2009 Apr 16, 2009

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Did you try cleaning up the media cache files? You said you were experimenting with importing files into projects. I don't know why, but Pr seems to have 2 copies of the media cache files. One is in the project directory, but the second copy is in the C:\Documents and Settings\%USERPROFILE%\Application Data\Adobe\Common\Media Cache\ .

Does anyone know of what to set so that Pr only uses the project directory? I find it annoying that it litters my harddisk with all these cache files from various projects, and doesn't clean up after itself.

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Community Beginner ,
Apr 16, 2009 Apr 16, 2009

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Thanks for all efforts to explain.

I am on the trail of another completely different answer.

I have security features to try to protect the computer, that security device itself as regards to how it appears in Vista was also looking cranky, so I contacted the vendor and they said to do a bunch of report file dumps and email them, I looked at one file before I emailed it, and it reports that the security device detected activity by a trojan horse linked to Ezula. It is in the hands of the security company to analyse the symptoms and the log and if it is a new trojan horse I guess they will track it down because the log shows it 'calling home' and the 'method of entry' so my guess is they should be able to go on a fishing expedition for it and trap it and start analysing it. I hope that is what they are doing anyway. So it is not yet confirmed that this is a trojan horse that has broken in nor how it relates to operation of Premiere Pro CS4 but I think now that is going to be what it is. For info, I found Ezula is adware that embeds itself deeply in Internet Explorer, then it would appear tthat a hacker built a trojan horse to gain entry through the adware. I am no expert on these matters so we leave it to the security company to figure out whether this is so. The observable folders on the C: drive including the hidden folders don't even account for 20Gbytes, it is possible Vista produces loads of files of its own that it just doesn't let you see such as rollback points, but still I think the final analysis will be a trojan horse that runs in the address space of other programs and that attacks the Vista NTFS file allocation tables to make it appear as though disk is being used when it isn't, its a wild theory and I will let you know when security company confirms or denies. But this is the problem with the likes of Adobe forcing us to put our main computer on the internet if we want all the product features, we are just going to get hacked sooner or later.

Thanks again everyoine.

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Community Beginner ,
Apr 16, 2009 Apr 16, 2009

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Adobe deserves criticism for its shoddy QC, but not for making you expose your main machine to risk on the internet.  I never do that, and I never have had a virus or malware on it--never in all the years I've been doing this.  I have picked up a few on my internet machine, though, but they are easily fixed with the security scheme I use.

As for restore points possibly eating up disk space, which you alluded to earlier--another never for me. Restore points are a half assed measure at best. My security system is a full clone backup of my C drive  starting the day I install an OS  on it, and every time I add a program, and every day when I am working a big complex project. Otherwise, once a week. It takes a few minutes only. That way I  can restore everything in equally few minutes should anything bad happen, like poorly designed software affecting other software, a virus, malware, etc, and including drive failure--which has happened twice over the years.

Don't get me wrong, a virus checker is very useful to a point, but real security design has to start long before you install one, especially if your machine is the heart of your business, as it is for me.  What is that old saying?  An ounce of prevention is worth..........

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Community Beginner ,
Apr 16, 2009 Apr 16, 2009

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Yeah, I did not take backups that often cos I did not intend putting the machine onto the net, then I got this device that said it would protect against everything by isolating my machine and making it invisible, I await the analysis by the company but it does appear not to have worked, the only thing that works is very real physical isolation and do not use the internet at all from the main machine. Like I say it simply is not confirmed yet but neither is it denied. You cannot actually go so far as to blame Adobe because stopping hackers is the job of the op sys vendor really so I blame Microsoft, the only blame for Adobe is the policy that some functions require internet connection in order to work when they know internet is not secure, so for instance if you want to use the emulators for things like these mobile phones they want you to be connected, I tried that one phone emulator and it said so, I wish they just put all documentation and all software on the DVD. I can roll back to an earlier Vista version from a USB backup disk that is always powered off, then rebuild as necessary, but I want the security firm to see if it is a trojan in fact first and to see if it can upgrade the security device and provide a roll out of the trojan's work. Right now I am still scripting the documentary and this second quarter is getting this Premiere Pro up ready for third quarter production so I can be philosophical for now, but yes later I will get more disciplined. But at least now I (almost) know the security device is not the all singing wonder they said it was. Oh well. I use a second machine too, a PS3 with Linux, that is what I am using now, this one doesn't seem to get hacked even though it is my sacrificial machine.

Message du 16/04/09 14:21

De : "don solomon"

A : "JONES Peter"

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Objet : Premiere Pro CS4 eats my C: drive in Vista Ultimate 64-bit SP1

Adobe deserves criticism for its shoddy QC, but not for maing you exposing your main machine at risk on the internet. I never do that, and I never have had a virus or malware on it--never in all the years I've been doing this. I have picked up a few on my internet machine, though, but they are easily fixed with the security scheme I use.

As for restore points possibly eating up disk space, which you alluded to earlieranother never for me. Restore points are a half assed measure at best. My security system is a full clone backup of my C drive starting the day I install and OS on it, and every time I add add a program, and every day when I am working a big complex project. Otherwise, once a week. It takes a few minutes only. That way I can restore everything in equally few minutes should anything bad happen, like poorly designed software affecting other software, a virus, malware, etc, and including drive failurewhich has happened twice over the years.

Don't get me wrong, a virus checker is very useful to a point, but real security design has to start long before you install one, especially if your machine is the heart of your business, as it is for me. What is that old saying? An ounce of prevention is worth..........

>

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Community Beginner ,
Apr 17, 2009 Apr 17, 2009

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IT IS NOW PROVEN THAT PREMIERE PRO CS4 EATS THE C: DRIVE.

The trojan horse infiltration is sort of coincidental.

I restored Vista installation from backup using the Vista DVD restore and refomat utility for the C: drive, I built up software etc that was not coverd by that backup, I took incremental backups as I went so now I can restore quickly to just before and just after Adobe Premiere Pro CS4 installation.

I beefed up security broadly as security company recommended, because I never had a anti-virus turned on, just a fancy gateway, now I have Kaspersky, and reports are no penetrations.

In the meantime I isolated not just that Premiere Pro does the eating but where/when.

THE ANSWER AS TO CAUSE OF EATING OF C: DRIVE IS THE IMPORT OF AVCHD ASSETS. Everytime you import an asset that is stored on the RAID0 drive for some unknown reason Premier Pro CS4 eats a apparently corresponding size of C: drive disk space and this space cannot be seen in any folders on the C: drive, it is just lost and irrecoverable except by a restore as above!!!! After you use the File->Import function you are allowed to continue working but in the meantime you will notice that Premiere Pro does work as well on that file, I have the french language version, at the bottom of the screen it says "Uniformisation[filename].MTS" and it is during this process that the C: drive gets eaten.

WHERE ARE ADOBE SUPPORT WHEN YOU NEED THEM????

I cannot enter a support request to tell them and I am in my 90-day free bug-fix period.

ACTUALLY I AM IN NOW, just a registration problem so they have been informed formally, they have to verify entitlement to the support but maybe we will have the answer next week.

Thanks everyone.

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LEGEND ,
Apr 17, 2009 Apr 17, 2009

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Chances are you've got the scratch disks set up on C: in the Preferences.  If you change that to the 😧 drive, you should be OK.

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Contributor ,
Apr 17, 2009 Apr 17, 2009

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has premiere for a week and already wants to blame it for the troubles of the world. Perhaps, you might want to try to learn it and figure out how to get it to put files where you want them first. As Jim states... you need to look at your scratch disk setup.

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Community Beginner ,
Apr 18, 2009 Apr 18, 2009

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I will, BUT the issue is that what it takes it never gives back. No matter where the scratch disk goes I want it not to gobble the given real physical disk. I take it the scratch disk is a temporary work area but it should not take up unlimited real disk, whatever disk it goes on you have to be able to control it. That is what I want Adobe Support to answer to. See my other answer.

Message du 18/04/09 03:01

De : "Phil Griffith"

A : "JONES Peter"

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Objet : Premiere Pro CS4 eats my C: drive in Vista Ultimate 64-bit SP1

has premiere for a week and already wants to blame it for the troubles of the world. Perhaps, you might want to try to learn it and figure out how to get it to put files where you want them first. As Jim states... you need to look at your scratch disk setup.

>

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LEGEND ,
Apr 18, 2009 Apr 18, 2009

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the issue is that what it takes it never gives back.

Of course not.  These are hard drive files, not memory data.  How is Premiere supposed to know when you're done with the project?  It'd be shoddy programming if those files went away without your explicit desire to delete them.  That's why you do it manually using a file manager when you're ready.

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Community Beginner ,
Apr 19, 2009 Apr 19, 2009

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When this problem first appeared, I did find some files on the C: drive and I deleted them but they did not account for the mass of data gobbled up, and when isolating source of the problem and showing that it occurs during AVCHD asset import and not for example at a later stage such as rendering I am also able to show that it does produce corresponding visible files that you can see in a disk explorer. The visible files of which I think you speak are under c:Users directory, before restoring my C: drive from backup and using a disk format at the same time, I did find such files and deleted them, they never reappeared, CS4 kept eating disk during AVCHD asset import and the space taken by all visible folders did not account for anywhere near all the disk. Something funny is going on, CS4 is producing secret files that no one can see, that even Vista cannot show to you, even when you ask for hidden files to be displayed as well.

Message du 19/04/09 06:56

De : "Jim Simon"

A : "JONES Peter"

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Objet : Premiere Pro CS4 eats my C: drive in Vista Ultimate 64-bit SP1

I will, BUT the issue is that what it takes it never gives back.

When you're done with a project, you delete these files manually using a file explorer.

>

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LEGEND ,
Apr 19, 2009 Apr 19, 2009

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CS4 is producing secret files that no one can see, that even Vista cannot show to you, even when you ask for hidden files to be displayed as well.

I just don't believe that's possible.  The most likely explanation here is observer error.

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Community Beginner ,
Apr 20, 2009 Apr 20, 2009

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Before my Vista restore from backup, while playing with project setup in CS4 my Vista eventually alerted me to full disk and the properties display showed a red bar. I cleaned the disk and deleted the C:\Users\client files of CS4 and went on playing and in a couple of hours 30Gb got eaten again and cleanup could not free anything this time and there were no files under C:\Users\Client and I had to give up and restore the C: drive from backup and use a reformat at the same time. After that I have played with project set up but not with any kind of output such as export or render, and the process of importing AVCHD assets shows again the C: drive being eaten and no visible files on C: drive to account for it. Seeing is believing so I could film the disk-eating party-trick of CS4 associated with AVCHD asset import but the file would be too big to send to anyone, although maybe Adobe Support could have it mailed to them on large memory key. But they have not contacted me yet.

Message du 20/04/09 00:47

De : "Jim Simon"

A : "JONES Peter"

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Objet : Premiere Pro CS4 eats my C: drive in Vista Ultimate 64-bit SP1

CS4 is producing secret files that no one can see, that even Vista cannot show to you, even when you ask for hidden files to be displayed as well.

I just don't believe that's possible. The most likely explanation here is observer error.

>

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Community Beginner ,
Apr 18, 2009 Apr 18, 2009

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Yes, but won't that just eat the 😧 drive? Less catastrophic I grant, but still a bug in need of a fix from Adobe. You see the issue is that it does not free up the scratch space, and I am playing with project set up over and over because actually this is my first time ever, this means that if my project assets total say 50Gb and I set the project up twice with a deletion in between the scratch expands to 100Gb, so on and so forth, basically it never gives back that which it takes and you cannot see it on the disk via Vista disk browsing to be able to delete it manually. So I await Adobe Technical Support to advise in the coming week. I don't plan to start production proper until July this period is learning and getting Adobe integrated/tested

Thanks!

Message du 17/04/09 21:36

De : "Jim Simon"

A : "JONES Peter"

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Objet : Premiere Pro CS4 eats my C: drive in Vista Ultimate 64-bit SP1

Chances are you've got the scratch disks set up on C: in the Preferences. If you change that to the 😧 drive, you should be OK.

>

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LEGEND ,
Apr 18, 2009 Apr 18, 2009

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Yes, but won't that just eat the 😧 drive?

It will, but you really have no choice in the matter.  Premire needs those files to work.  This is not a bug.  Your only real option is to make sure you have enough drive space to do the job.

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LEGEND ,
Apr 18, 2009 Apr 18, 2009

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I find it extremely hard to believe that Premiere/Vista is writing to a disk and you cannot see the files.  I have never heard of anything like that.  Did you do anything unusual to your formatting of the disks like changing the block size?

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Community Beginner ,
Apr 19, 2009 Apr 19, 2009

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I allow Vista to format the drives inside the computer on a permanent basis as NTFS file systems with all defaults.

Just for clarity about the nature of the problem so we are all reading from the same page so to speak.

Imagine you work on 10 consecutive projects, you create edit delete each project one after the other. Lets imagine for arguments sake they all import 30Gb of AVCHD assets. You will end up with a loss of 300Gb of disk, permanently. Even though at any point in time you only have one project with 30Gb of assets. And I understand that people say that this is a scratch disk used by CS4 to help it with intermediate storage, and that there has to be some correspondence between scratch disk size and imported assets size, but when you delete a project then CS4 should free up the corresponding amount of space from the scratch disk. And the files should always be visible in the Vista file system.

Just in case this was not clear to everyone.

Thanks!

Message du 18/04/09 21:02

De : "Bill Gehrke"

A : "JONES Peter"

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Objet : Premiere Pro CS4 eats my C: drive in Vista Ultimate 64-bit SP1

I find it extremely hard to believe that Premiere/Vista is writing to a disk and you cannot see the files. I have never heard of anything like that. Did you do anything unusual to your formatting of the disks like changing the block size?

>

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LEGEND ,
Apr 19, 2009 Apr 19, 2009

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but when you delete a project then CS4 should free up the corresponding amount of space from the scratch disk. And the files should always be visible in the Vista file system.

The files are visible.  And as previously covered, Premiere doesn't delete them automatically, as it shouldn't.  You do that manually when you no longer need the files.

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Community Beginner ,
Apr 20, 2009 Apr 20, 2009

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I think the visible files of which you speak may be generated whenever you do things like exports or renders. I did find such files under C:Users/Client on occaision. Those are not the problem. There is disk space being eaten on the C: drive and analysis of the folders shows that there are no CS4 files being produced openly and visibly while this eating is going on, and tests show this eating is associated with import of AVCHD assets. I do know what you are talking about when you refer to visible files on the C: drive at said location because I found them and eliminated them as cause of the said lost disk space, there is a second source of disk-eating going on during importation of AVCHD assets and there are no files being openly visibly produced under C:Users/client during this import process because I looked for them but C: drive disk space is nevertheless being consumed and cannot be tracked to any files anywhere on the disk even when you tell explorer to show hidden files

.

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LEGEND ,
Apr 20, 2009 Apr 20, 2009

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I think the visible files of which you speak may be generated whenever you do things like exports or renders.

In this case I was referring to the files Premiere generates automatically whenever you import media - things like .pek files, .cfa files, Indexing for MPG sources (which includes AVCHD), that kind of thing.  Those files are fully visible and are stored where you have your Scratch disks set up.

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New Here ,
Apr 20, 2009 Apr 20, 2009

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I installed Windows 7  64 bit, in a dual boot configuration on my XP machine, and I had similar issues also when I would import files. My C: drive would just loose real estate really quick immediately after importing files, and I couldn't find the files becasue they were hidden. I had to do a search by "date modified" to be able to get to the files that were created. So after I located the files I just put a shortcut on my desktop to bring me back to the files if I forget to put in the proper settings when importing. I don't remember ever having that problem with XP Pro. Windows 7 looks alot like Vista, so maybe we just need to extra vigilant about where my files are going.

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