Premiere Pro playback/render stutters and is very glitchy

New Here ,
Jan 29, 2020

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This has been happening ever since I moved to my new laptop for all my editing. During playback, the video will stutter or glitch, sometimes freezing the program. I tried clearing cache, lowering to 1/4, and giving more ram. Sometimes in the export, it looks just as glitchy. In this video, I tried speed ramping a drone shot I took of a client. I don't understand what I'm doing wrong. 

 

I am using the MSI P65 Creator Laptop. I use Nvidia Studio Drivers.

i7-8750H

32gb ram

gtx 1060

 

Any suggestions?

Adobe Community Professional
Correct answer by R Neil Haugen | Adobe Community Professional

Laptops aren't just computers in a smaller case ... there are a lot of changes in the internal operation to essentially simulate the capabilities of a full-size desktop in a smaller package which cannot produce and dissipate the same heat-load. And ... if a computer has to rein-in things to keep heat production down, well ... that's a huge limitation right there.

 

I've got a Predator Triton 500 with a 2080 card in it ... and it could as easily behave like this with the same media and effects, and it's a lot higher-gear than yours.

 

So first thing, make sure when running Premiere you're plugged into the wall. Battery operation typically scales back the laptop resource use heavily.

 

Second, understand ... your GPU and mine may have the same number as the card that goes in a desktop, but jeepers ... they're less than 1/4 the size of the desktop model ... think about that. It's ... similar ... hardware, but not nearly as capable. Same for other things in that system. Even the CPUs for laptops are simplified versions of the similar number for a desktop.

 

Third ... turn of ALL power-saving/control features in the laptop while running Premiere.

 

So that's the base situation you're operating under. Now ... to get to better performance with severe hardware limitations, you have a few options.

 

The first one is to understand the nature of the media you're using. That drone media is guaranteed H.264/265, long-GOP, and the most difficult media to play within an NLE (especially when applying effects to it!) out there. That media doesn't have actual video frames except for every so often. And for drones, often times, that's 30 or more 'frames' in between real full frames of highly compressed video. Each of those "real" complete frames is called an i-frame.

 

Every "frame" in between is only composed of data-sets listing:

 

  1. All pixels that have changed since the last i-frame.
  2. All pixels that will change before the next i-frame.
  3. Any pixels that will "fit" both 1 and 2 above.

 

This completely rags out the CPU/RAM subsytems doing the computing of every flipping frame ... which requires constantly storing and accessing at least two other complete frames plus a lot of computations.

 

Six slow cores and 32GB of RAM is not considered a hefty enough rig for such work to flow easily.

 

So your two choices here for better playback/exporting are:

 

1. transcode the media prior to or on ingestion to an intraframe codec such as Cineform, ProRes, or DNxHD/R;

2. create proxies and edit while having the proxies toggled on.

 

The transcodes ... well, even the proxies probably ... will be larger than your original files on disc. But you can dump them on completion of the project as you can recreate them at any time from the originals.

 

Also ... you can setup watch folders within MediaEncoder, so that you can simply drag/drop a bunch of clips into a folder on your computer, and Me will automatically apply the preset you have for that folder ... transcoding (even renaming if you wish) to X format/codec specs, and placing the resulting media in Y folder. Do that over night, you don't even spend time watching it work.

 

Neil

TOPICS
Crash, Error or problem, Export, Freeze or hang, Performance

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Premiere Pro playback/render stutters and is very glitchy

New Here ,
Jan 29, 2020

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This has been happening ever since I moved to my new laptop for all my editing. During playback, the video will stutter or glitch, sometimes freezing the program. I tried clearing cache, lowering to 1/4, and giving more ram. Sometimes in the export, it looks just as glitchy. In this video, I tried speed ramping a drone shot I took of a client. I don't understand what I'm doing wrong. 

 

I am using the MSI P65 Creator Laptop. I use Nvidia Studio Drivers.

i7-8750H

32gb ram

gtx 1060

 

Any suggestions?

Adobe Community Professional
Correct answer by R Neil Haugen | Adobe Community Professional

Laptops aren't just computers in a smaller case ... there are a lot of changes in the internal operation to essentially simulate the capabilities of a full-size desktop in a smaller package which cannot produce and dissipate the same heat-load. And ... if a computer has to rein-in things to keep heat production down, well ... that's a huge limitation right there.

 

I've got a Predator Triton 500 with a 2080 card in it ... and it could as easily behave like this with the same media and effects, and it's a lot higher-gear than yours.

 

So first thing, make sure when running Premiere you're plugged into the wall. Battery operation typically scales back the laptop resource use heavily.

 

Second, understand ... your GPU and mine may have the same number as the card that goes in a desktop, but jeepers ... they're less than 1/4 the size of the desktop model ... think about that. It's ... similar ... hardware, but not nearly as capable. Same for other things in that system. Even the CPUs for laptops are simplified versions of the similar number for a desktop.

 

Third ... turn of ALL power-saving/control features in the laptop while running Premiere.

 

So that's the base situation you're operating under. Now ... to get to better performance with severe hardware limitations, you have a few options.

 

The first one is to understand the nature of the media you're using. That drone media is guaranteed H.264/265, long-GOP, and the most difficult media to play within an NLE (especially when applying effects to it!) out there. That media doesn't have actual video frames except for every so often. And for drones, often times, that's 30 or more 'frames' in between real full frames of highly compressed video. Each of those "real" complete frames is called an i-frame.

 

Every "frame" in between is only composed of data-sets listing:

 

  1. All pixels that have changed since the last i-frame.
  2. All pixels that will change before the next i-frame.
  3. Any pixels that will "fit" both 1 and 2 above.

 

This completely rags out the CPU/RAM subsytems doing the computing of every flipping frame ... which requires constantly storing and accessing at least two other complete frames plus a lot of computations.

 

Six slow cores and 32GB of RAM is not considered a hefty enough rig for such work to flow easily.

 

So your two choices here for better playback/exporting are:

 

1. transcode the media prior to or on ingestion to an intraframe codec such as Cineform, ProRes, or DNxHD/R;

2. create proxies and edit while having the proxies toggled on.

 

The transcodes ... well, even the proxies probably ... will be larger than your original files on disc. But you can dump them on completion of the project as you can recreate them at any time from the originals.

 

Also ... you can setup watch folders within MediaEncoder, so that you can simply drag/drop a bunch of clips into a folder on your computer, and Me will automatically apply the preset you have for that folder ... transcoding (even renaming if you wish) to X format/codec specs, and placing the resulting media in Y folder. Do that over night, you don't even spend time watching it work.

 

Neil

TOPICS
Crash, Error or problem, Export, Freeze or hang, Performance

Views

207

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Jan 29, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 29, 2020

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Laptops aren't just computers in a smaller case ... there are a lot of changes in the internal operation to essentially simulate the capabilities of a full-size desktop in a smaller package which cannot produce and dissipate the same heat-load. And ... if a computer has to rein-in things to keep heat production down, well ... that's a huge limitation right there.

 

I've got a Predator Triton 500 with a 2080 card in it ... and it could as easily behave like this with the same media and effects, and it's a lot higher-gear than yours.

 

So first thing, make sure when running Premiere you're plugged into the wall. Battery operation typically scales back the laptop resource use heavily.

 

Second, understand ... your GPU and mine may have the same number as the card that goes in a desktop, but jeepers ... they're less than 1/4 the size of the desktop model ... think about that. It's ... similar ... hardware, but not nearly as capable. Same for other things in that system. Even the CPUs for laptops are simplified versions of the similar number for a desktop.

 

Third ... turn of ALL power-saving/control features in the laptop while running Premiere.

 

So that's the base situation you're operating under. Now ... to get to better performance with severe hardware limitations, you have a few options.

 

The first one is to understand the nature of the media you're using. That drone media is guaranteed H.264/265, long-GOP, and the most difficult media to play within an NLE (especially when applying effects to it!) out there. That media doesn't have actual video frames except for every so often. And for drones, often times, that's 30 or more 'frames' in between real full frames of highly compressed video. Each of those "real" complete frames is called an i-frame.

 

Every "frame" in between is only composed of data-sets listing:

 

  1. All pixels that have changed since the last i-frame.
  2. All pixels that will change before the next i-frame.
  3. Any pixels that will "fit" both 1 and 2 above.

 

This completely rags out the CPU/RAM subsytems doing the computing of every flipping frame ... which requires constantly storing and accessing at least two other complete frames plus a lot of computations.

 

Six slow cores and 32GB of RAM is not considered a hefty enough rig for such work to flow easily.

 

So your two choices here for better playback/exporting are:

 

1. transcode the media prior to or on ingestion to an intraframe codec such as Cineform, ProRes, or DNxHD/R;

2. create proxies and edit while having the proxies toggled on.

 

The transcodes ... well, even the proxies probably ... will be larger than your original files on disc. But you can dump them on completion of the project as you can recreate them at any time from the originals.

 

Also ... you can setup watch folders within MediaEncoder, so that you can simply drag/drop a bunch of clips into a folder on your computer, and Me will automatically apply the preset you have for that folder ... transcoding (even renaming if you wish) to X format/codec specs, and placing the resulting media in Y folder. Do that over night, you don't even spend time watching it work.

 

Neil

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New Here ,
Jan 29, 2020

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Thanks for the input! 

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Community Beginner ,
Dec 27, 2020

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thank you for the input, however, i am not sure what it means or what to do 😞 a computer dummy here

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