Random artifacting and glitching in imported footage.

Community Beginner ,
Apr 30, 2021 Apr 30, 2021

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This is a weird one, and have been struggling with it for MONTHS with no solution.
When I import footage (all of which is H.264) into Premiere and work on it, it will present random sections with glitching and artifacting like the ones presented in the screenshot attached.
The glitches aren't consistent, they seem to move around the files. If I save and exit the project and open it back up, sometimes they are gone, but present in other parts of the video track. It's maddening.

The glitches appear in the source monitor, the program monitor AND the exported final product.
I am running an NVIDIA RTX 3080, with the latest Studio drivers.
Any help would be GREATLY appreciated.

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Adobe Employee ,
Apr 30, 2021 Apr 30, 2021

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Rax,

Try a clean reinstallation of the latest NVIDIA drivers. Which CPU are you running? Consider switching off all Hardware Decoding in Prefs > Media and reboot. That may help.

 

Thanks,
Kevin

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Community Beginner ,
May 05, 2021 May 05, 2021

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Hi Kevin,
Clean re-installation of drivers did not seem to help. Is this a known issue with NVIDIA RTX 3080's?
I am running a Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-5820K CPU @ 3.30GHz (12 CPUs), ~3.3GHz
Switching off Hardware Decoding has fixed it, but I would really rather lean on the power of my GPU instead of switching it off as a workaround. Is there no way to use Hardware Encoding + Decoding and fix this issue another way? My CPU isn't great but my GPU is brilliant, so it's the majority of my editing power right there.

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Community Beginner ,
May 14, 2021 May 14, 2021

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Hi Kevin, Just bumping this.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
May 14, 2021 May 14, 2021

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Premiere is built around the CPU, with the rest of the hardware as basically assistants for it. Each of these apps is conceived of differently. Which is why, say, talking with Puget Systems about a new rig gets such different build suggestions based on how you're going to use the apps.

 

For instance, Resolve can utilize multiple GPUs, so a build primarily for R will have either a truly massive single GPU or quite likely two strong GPUs side by side.

 

But a build designed for Premiere will feature the CPU with the GPU being a major/important assistant, but secondary to the CPU.

 

The whole encoding/decoding thing is a hassle too. Some CPUs are built with better internals for either H.264 or some of the log/raw media, some are built with the assumption such work is going to a graphics card or chip. So on one machine, hardware encoding rocks, on another, maybe even a more spendy CPU, software encoding actually works better.

 

It all, gives most of us headaches, right?

 

So ... that's a seven year old CPU with only six cores. Unfortunately in PrPro, you can't resuscitate an older CPU with simply adding a hot GPU. I had a six core rig up until a few months back ... then went to a 24 core Ryzen, 128GB of RAM, and a 2080Ti. And my rig was only a bit over three years old. Don't know how many times I've done that migration dance. Hate it every time.

 

Neil

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Community Beginner ,
May 14, 2021 May 14, 2021

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Hey Neil,

 

Appreciate the thorough and thoughtful reply. 🙂 
I understand -- this build was originally with a 980ti and the first thing my upgrade dollars went on was a new GPU, as I am also a bit of a gamer and stream a lot. I can see now I'll need to drop some dosh on a new CPU asap. Hopefully I can get one that fits my current mobo, though that seems like it would be too good to be true, huh?

Best wishes, and thanks again!

Max

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Adobe Community Professional ,
May 14, 2021 May 14, 2021

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That's macro-blocking.  

 

Do you happen to know the bit rate of the source footage?  Low bite rate H264 is prone to this when it's used as source footage.

 

Have you tried transcoding your H264 to Appel ProRes422 LT or another CODEC that's good for editing?  Assuming the H264 holds up to that conversion, it should edit well enough. 

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