Reverting to full size clips after proxy edit

Engaged ,
Jul 02, 2019

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I have looked at so many tutorials on creating and working with proxies in Premiere and every one I've watched ends before the final step. I'm hoping it's because it is so easy they figured I'd figure it out myself. I haven't

Here's the question: After creating proxies (in my case, 1280x720) and cutting a sequence, how do I go back to the original (in my case, 4K) files and export at full resolution? Do I simply duplicate the sequence and change the sequence settings to (in my case) 5120x2700 and send to Media Encoder?

Martin

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 02, 2019

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You don't create sequences for the proxies ... you toggle use the proxies on sequences of your full media.

After creating the proxies, simply drag/drop your regular media onto the sequence. To engage the proxies, you use the "Toggle Proxies" icon which may be hidden in your Program monitor's "extra" controls, accessed through the + icon on the lower right of the Program monitor control block.

When that's blue, Premiere is using proxies ... when gray, original media.

And export as normal and Premiere always uses the original media.

If you've worked proxy-size sequences, go to the Sequence settings dialog, and in the drop-down list at the top, scroll to the top to the "Custom" option, and then resize your sequence settings.

Neil

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Engaged ,
Jul 02, 2019

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Neil,

But I'm cutting in a 1920 x 1080 sequence—it's all my rig will handle—and I want to export as 4K. So do I simply duplicate the sequence and change the sequence settings to (in my case) 5120x2700 and send to Media Encoder?

Martin

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 02, 2019

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Again, for using proxies, you set your frame-size for your sequences at the size you want to export at typically. Or the original media size if that is better for you. Then for better playback during editing, toggle on the proxies. Then you get the better playback. When paused, toggle them off to view the original media with all resizing, color, whatever effects you used.

You don't use different sized sequences.

Neil

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Engaged ,
Jul 02, 2019

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It's probably because I'm using an old rig, but playback on a 4K size sequence is extremely stilted even when playing proxies. If I cut into a 1920x1080 sequence though, playback is fine. Given that, does it then work to duplicate the final sequence and change the sequence settings and then export?

Martin

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 02, 2019

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Intriguing ... when I've got proxies on, my playback is vastly improved. You have to toggle them on, of course ... if you don't you're running the original media. But with the small Cineform preset included, I get good playback even with a 4k sequence. Now, going to the 4k original media, if there's any effects added like a ton of Lumetri ... and well, it ain't great.

But toggling to the attached proxies, it's fine. Which is why they're there. I have Alt-T set for toggle proxies.

Wondering why it would be different for your rig. Huh.

Neil

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 02, 2019

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As to your last question, probably ... but to be sure, test it.

Neil

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 02, 2019

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Here's the question: After creating proxies (in my case, 1280x720) and cutting a sequence, how do I go back to the original (in my case, 4K) files and export at full resolution? Do I simply duplicate the sequence and change the sequence settings to (in my case) 5120x2700 and send to Media Encoder?

Martin, it sounds like you've been editing with the Proxy files directly.  This approach worked in Final Cut Pro classic where you'd just use the FCP Media Manager to generate a Full Resolution project that links to your Full Resolution clips that matches your edit.  Premiere Pro does not do that.

If you've been editing the 1280x720 Proxy files in a 1280x720 Sequence, you have to manually rebuild your edit at full resolution.

Next time:

  • Import your Full Resolution clips and create Proxies from those (you can do this via an Ingest setting or by right-clicking the Full Resolution clips).
  • Wait for your Proxy files to process.
  • If not already present, add the Toggle Proxies button to the Source Monitor or Program (the setting can be toggled on or off in either panel).
  • Edit as you would normally with Toggle Proxies enabled.  As long as your computer can play the Proxy clips smoothly (which it sounds like it does), you're good to edit as long as that icon is blue.
  • When you export, Premiere Pro will use the Full Resolution media.  This may be really, really, really slow and there's a chance that you may have to move your edit to a more powerful computer; however, even though your computer doesn't play the Full Resolution clips smoothly, it may still be able to render the Full Resolution.  Ironically, you wind up with a Full Resolution edited master that you have to make a low-resolution version of to watch.

Adobe published a great graphic that shows the essential things to set-up.  If I can find it, I'll link it.

-Warren

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New Here ,
Jan 24, 2021

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I have an issue, I believe I've edited the proxie files directly in premiere pro (im new to this) is there a way that I can convert my project  back to 4k for the project export?  I would I manuelly rebuild my edit in full resolution is this a hard process?

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 24, 2021

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Did you create the proxy files somewhere else, and import those into Premiere instead of the original files?

 

Or did you have Premiere create proxies, and then edit using the proxies?

 

If the former, that's easy enough if the clips are all named precisely the same as the originals. Simply select the originals in the bins, "make offline". Then select the clips in the bin, right-click, and re-link. This brings up the Locate window, just navigate to the original files and select the first one, tell it to use that file. It should select all of them.

 

If the latter, and you've edited with the "use proxies" button in the Program monitor toggled on, any export will automatically go to the original media.

 

Neil

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New Here ,
Jan 24, 2021

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thank you for your reply.. This is the first time I've done this, so I'm still trying to figure this whole concept out.. when I right click on a  clip and select the "properties" option, it tells me

 

that Save/Adobe Premiere Pro Auto-Save/C0073_Proxy.mp4 Type: MPEG Movie File Size: 8.57 MB Image Size: 1024 x 540 Frame Rate: 23.976 Source Audio Format: 48000 Hz - Compressed - Stereo Project Audio Format: 48000 Hz - 32 bit floating point - Stereo Total Duration: 00:00:07:12 Pixel Aspect Ratio: 1.0 Alpha: None Video Codec Type: MP4/MOV H.264 4:2:0

 

I took the 4k footage and dropped it directly in premiere pro and it converted to proxies through media encoder.. when I got to look at their location, they're stored as proxy.mp4 the original 4k clips are stored on an external hardrive... when I toggle the use proxies option, on or off, the footage remains the same.. so I'm thinking that I must have converted the clips to proxies and then edited them directly.. I still have the original footage unaltered on my external hardrive, but I have edited the proxies that are listed in premiere pro.. not sure if I'm making sense, as I'm brand new to this process...

 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 24, 2021

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You normally don't see a difference in toggling proxies on/off in the image. Premiere creates the proxies and links them to the original media in metadata. Toggling the proxy switch determines which is being used.

 

And typically, you don't see a difference between images between proxies and originals. Which is why many people put a watermark or slight proportion change on their proxies so it is obvious which they are working with.

 

Premiere automatically exports from the original media unless you tell it to export from the proxies, and it doesn't matter if the proxies are toggled on or off in the Program monitor.

 

Neil

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Adobe Employee ,
Jul 04, 2019

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Hi Martinnel,

As Neil and Warren suggested, you don't need to switch between the proxy and original high-resolution media files when you going for export. Premiere Pro will automatically use the original higher resolution media files for the export. You just need to ensure that you set your sequence to the desired frame size. While using Proxy try using more efficient codecs like Apple ProRes instead of h.264. As in some cases, h.264 codec may still cause performance issues because of their higher level of compression.

Here are a few links that you might find useful.

Basic Premiere Pro editing workflow

Adobe Premiere Pro Help | Ingest and Proxy Workflow in Adobe Premiere Pro CC

Thanks,

Sumeet

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Engaged ,
Jul 05, 2019

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Thank you all for your responses. I suspect my issue is that my system (see below) is old and is approaching or past its expiration date. I have thoroughly run tests and if I cut a sequence in my footage's native frame rate and resolution—23.976, 5120 x 2700—and use the proxies—and I've tried several of the default choices in ProRes and Cineform— I can not achieve fluid playback, again, playing the proxies, even after rendering.

If, however, I create a 1920 x 1080 sequence, then, with proxies toggled on, I get a clean fluid playback and the image appears on my external (via BlackMagic Intensity 4K) TV. As discussed in this thread.

So my problem/question, which you have all considerately addressed as well as possible given my limited explanation, is can I simply convert a copy of the final sequence to 5120 x 2700, check for proper scaling and export. I've run a test on this and it appears to be correct, but I don't have a 4K monitor so it's difficult for me to tell if I've had true success.

At any rate, thank you all for your help and guidance. I will muddle on.

Martin

Early 2009 Nehalem MacPro4,1, 2 X 2.6 GHz Quad-Core

OS High Sierra 10.13.6

Samsung 850 EVO 1 TB system drive

32 GB RAM

ATI Radeon HD 4870 GRFX Card

Blackmagic Intensity Pro 4K, Driver: 10.11.4

Adobe Premiere Pro CC 2019 v. 13.1.2

Adobe Media Encoder CC v. 13.0.2.39

Mocha Pro Plug-in v. 6.0.2 build 217.x

Boris Continuum 2019 v. 12.0.4

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 05, 2019

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Martin:

Even though not ideal, it sounds like you found a good workaround by going with a reduced frame size sequence as well as using proxies.

Have you considered adding a Blackmagic Intensity 4K PCI card to your Mac Pro along with a 4K TV?  Of course, that’s $600 or so that could go toward a new workstation.

-Warren

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Engaged ,
Jul 08, 2019

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Warren,

I do have the Intensity Pro 4K, just not a 4K monitor. But, while I might then be able to display on a new 4K monitor, I don't see how that would improve playback in general. I think really what it comes down to here, is I am asking more of my ten-year-old computer than it is willing to accommodate.

Martin

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 08, 2019

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Martin:

Have you run Blackmagic Design Disk Speed Test to see if any of the 2160p formats get a green checkbox?

Screen Shot 2019-07-08 at 10.50.00 AM.png

If you use Apple ProRes 422 (HQ) and your storage media provides sufficient bandwidth, you should be able to get smooth playback to a 4K TV connected to the Intensity Pro 4K's HDMI out port.

That said, hopefully, a newer machine is in your near future.  For what it's worth, the Intensity Pro 4K works really well in Thunderbolt 2 and Thunderbolt 3 equipped Macs when inside a Sonnet Echo Express SE Thunderbolt 3 to Full-Height/Half-Length PCIe Card Expansion System.  So, a cylinder Mac Pro (which are dropping in price), an iMac, an iMac Pro, a Mac mini or even a MacBook Pro are viable options.  And as I'm sure you're aware, any drives you have inside your current Mac Pro classic/cheesegrater can be moved to a Thunderbolt 2 or 3 4-bay drive enclosure.

Sonnet Echo Express SE I Thunderbolt 3 to Full-Height/Half-Length PCIe Card Expansion System

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/search?Ntt=Echo%20Express%20SE%20I%20&N=0&InitialSearch=yes&sts=ma&To...

$219

-Warren

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