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Slow Hardware encoding problem Premiere pro 14.2

New Here ,
Jun 03, 2020

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1. When exporting with hardware encoding enabled the process slows down about 18-30% into the exportprocess. 

First it takes off in a decent speed then it slows down to a crawl.

 

According to the task manager the GPU is only using about 12-15% of its capacity 

when exporting then it dies out about 18-30% (timeline)  into the process.

 

My computer specs is not the best so maybe that is the problem

Processor Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-3570K CPU @ 3.40GHz, 3801 Mhz, 4 Core(s), 4 Logical Processor(s)

Nvidia GTX1660

 

2. I turned off hardware encoding and it turns out the I get the same values as when I had Hardware encoding turned on, so it seems that the hardware encoding is not doing any work at all. The strange thing is that the GPU seems to get activated in the beginning of the export even if hardware encoding is turned off?

 

The computer acknowledges that hardware encoding should be working, however it does not seem to do anything at all ?

 

 

Kevin is correct. Your CPU is not only too old, but you have a woefully imbalanced configuration. The GTX 1660 is, IMHO, too much GPU for that i5-3570K. It just dies out in mid-export because that CPU could not keep up at all with the GPU.

 

Remember that I warned other people against seriously imbalanced configurations? You simply have a classic case of too much GPU and too little CPU. Many other people have the converse: Too much CPU and too little GPU. Both of those have caused MAJOR issues in content creation software, especially NLEs.

 

Unfortunately, there is absolutely no currently available Nvidia GPU at all whatsoever that's performance-matched or performance-balanced to your CPU. Your CPU is currently trapped in no-man's land, where all of the currently available Nvidia GPUs are either seriously overqualified or seriously underpowered. The best GPU match would have been a GeForce GTX 1050 Ti (of the older Pascal generation) but none of the newer Turing GPUs. Unfortunately, the 1050 Ti is now out of production, and becoming harder and harder to find new.

 

And I checked the bottleneck calculator. It's confirmed to be your CPU, I'm afraid. The i5-3570K is causing an almost 30% bottleneck to that GTX 1660. Anything above 20% bottleneck with regards to the CPU underperforming the GPU is not recommended for Premiere Pro. On the other hand, one can get away with an almost 50% bottleneck for a given GPU that's underperforming a given CPU. Perhaps a GTX 1650 (non-SUPER) with only GDDR5 VRAM might work with your system; however, it is also out of production at this point, replaced with a GDDR6 version of that same GPU which is definitely overqualified for your CPU (though not as much as the GTX 1660 currently is).

 

And as I mentioned, you're stuck in no-man's land (CPU-wise) because the only currently available GPUs below a GTX 1650 are either severely underpowered for any modern CPU or don't support NVENC hardware encoding at all.

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Error or problem, Export, Hardware or GPU, Performance

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Slow Hardware encoding problem Premiere pro 14.2

New Here ,
Jun 03, 2020

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1. When exporting with hardware encoding enabled the process slows down about 18-30% into the exportprocess. 

First it takes off in a decent speed then it slows down to a crawl.

 

According to the task manager the GPU is only using about 12-15% of its capacity 

when exporting then it dies out about 18-30% (timeline)  into the process.

 

My computer specs is not the best so maybe that is the problem

Processor Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-3570K CPU @ 3.40GHz, 3801 Mhz, 4 Core(s), 4 Logical Processor(s)

Nvidia GTX1660

 

2. I turned off hardware encoding and it turns out the I get the same values as when I had Hardware encoding turned on, so it seems that the hardware encoding is not doing any work at all. The strange thing is that the GPU seems to get activated in the beginning of the export even if hardware encoding is turned off?

 

The computer acknowledges that hardware encoding should be working, however it does not seem to do anything at all ?

 

 

Kevin is correct. Your CPU is not only too old, but you have a woefully imbalanced configuration. The GTX 1660 is, IMHO, too much GPU for that i5-3570K. It just dies out in mid-export because that CPU could not keep up at all with the GPU.

 

Remember that I warned other people against seriously imbalanced configurations? You simply have a classic case of too much GPU and too little CPU. Many other people have the converse: Too much CPU and too little GPU. Both of those have caused MAJOR issues in content creation software, especially NLEs.

 

Unfortunately, there is absolutely no currently available Nvidia GPU at all whatsoever that's performance-matched or performance-balanced to your CPU. Your CPU is currently trapped in no-man's land, where all of the currently available Nvidia GPUs are either seriously overqualified or seriously underpowered. The best GPU match would have been a GeForce GTX 1050 Ti (of the older Pascal generation) but none of the newer Turing GPUs. Unfortunately, the 1050 Ti is now out of production, and becoming harder and harder to find new.

 

And I checked the bottleneck calculator. It's confirmed to be your CPU, I'm afraid. The i5-3570K is causing an almost 30% bottleneck to that GTX 1660. Anything above 20% bottleneck with regards to the CPU underperforming the GPU is not recommended for Premiere Pro. On the other hand, one can get away with an almost 50% bottleneck for a given GPU that's underperforming a given CPU. Perhaps a GTX 1650 (non-SUPER) with only GDDR5 VRAM might work with your system; however, it is also out of production at this point, replaced with a GDDR6 version of that same GPU which is definitely overqualified for your CPU (though not as much as the GTX 1660 currently is).

 

And as I mentioned, you're stuck in no-man's land (CPU-wise) because the only currently available GPUs below a GTX 1650 are either severely underpowered for any modern CPU or don't support NVENC hardware encoding at all.

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Error or problem, Export, Hardware or GPU, Performance

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Jun 03, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 04, 2020

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Are you exporting H.264 or H.265? Hardware encoding only works with these codecs.

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Jun 04, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 04, 2020

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Your Intel Graphics Card is obselete (too old to do anything).

Stick to the nvidia card.

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Jun 04, 2020 1
Adobe Employee ,
Jun 04, 2020

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Hi Micael,

Sorry for the disappointing performance. I would go one step further and say that your system does not meet system requirements, so therefore, are not going to have a normal experience. The advice is to update your hardware or this situation will continue to get worse.

 

Sorry to tell you that.

 

Thanks,
Kevin

 

Please check system requirements!Please check system requirements!

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Jun 04, 2020 0
LEGEND ,
Jun 04, 2020

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Kevin is correct. Your CPU is not only too old, but you have a woefully imbalanced configuration. The GTX 1660 is, IMHO, too much GPU for that i5-3570K. It just dies out in mid-export because that CPU could not keep up at all with the GPU.

 

Remember that I warned other people against seriously imbalanced configurations? You simply have a classic case of too much GPU and too little CPU. Many other people have the converse: Too much CPU and too little GPU. Both of those have caused MAJOR issues in content creation software, especially NLEs.

 

Unfortunately, there is absolutely no currently available Nvidia GPU at all whatsoever that's performance-matched or performance-balanced to your CPU. Your CPU is currently trapped in no-man's land, where all of the currently available Nvidia GPUs are either seriously overqualified or seriously underpowered. The best GPU match would have been a GeForce GTX 1050 Ti (of the older Pascal generation) but none of the newer Turing GPUs. Unfortunately, the 1050 Ti is now out of production, and becoming harder and harder to find new.

 

And I checked the bottleneck calculator. It's confirmed to be your CPU, I'm afraid. The i5-3570K is causing an almost 30% bottleneck to that GTX 1660. Anything above 20% bottleneck with regards to the CPU underperforming the GPU is not recommended for Premiere Pro. On the other hand, one can get away with an almost 50% bottleneck for a given GPU that's underperforming a given CPU. Perhaps a GTX 1650 (non-SUPER) with only GDDR5 VRAM might work with your system; however, it is also out of production at this point, replaced with a GDDR6 version of that same GPU which is definitely overqualified for your CPU (though not as much as the GTX 1660 currently is).

 

And as I mentioned, you're stuck in no-man's land (CPU-wise) because the only currently available GPUs below a GTX 1650 are either severely underpowered for any modern CPU or don't support NVENC hardware encoding at all.

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Jun 04, 2020 1
New Here ,
Jun 04, 2020

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Hi!

 

Thank you for your advice, I suspected that my config was not up to par.

When I bought the GTX1660 my intention was to upgrade my PC, now

it seems that I have to do it.

 

So again all of you who answered my post, thank you for taking time and

explain what the problem is!

 

/Micael

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Jun 04, 2020 0
LEGEND ,
Jun 05, 2020

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For an Intel choice, I would go with an i5-10600K (if it becomes available) for that GPU. The 9th-Generation (9000-series) i5's are too expensive for what you get while also being superceded by the new 10000-series CPUs.

 

If AMD is in your sights, then go for a Ryzen 3 3300X or a Ryzen 5 3600 for that GTX 1660.

 

For either platform, you will need a new motherboard and new RAM. (That means that you cannot reuse your existing DDR3 RAM at all in a new desktop build since all current desktop CPU platforms are DDR4-only.) Go with at least 16 GB of RAM; however, 32 GB or more would be better, especially in an Intel platform, because of the way Intel memory controllers operate: They choke on single-rank sticks while heavily favoring double-rank sticks, and nearly all 8 GB sticks these days are only single-rank. So, if you do go with an Intel CPU but going with two 8 GB sticks for a total of 16 GB, you might as well go for a single 16 GB stick instead because two single-rank sticks, even in a proper dual-channel slot placement, would force single-channel memory controller operation in those CPUs. In order to attain the proper dual-channel memory operation with such low-capacity sticks, you will need to fill all four memory slots on the Intel motherboard just to achieve that.

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Jun 05, 2020 1
ntchi LATEST
Community Beginner ,
Oct 21, 2020

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Wow, amazing information.  I seem to have similar issues...

 

I just installed PP14.5 with the new Nvidia Studio driver with a GTX 1660 and a Xeon 2667-v2 in HP Z620 workstation, and strangely, my rendering using nvec is slower than using CPU.

 

It took 9 min rendering a 25min timelines using the new NVEC

And 6 min using CPU old mercury acceleration.

 

Which bottleneck calculator did you use?

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Oct 21, 2020 0