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Slow rendering in Premiere Pro CC with Ryzen 5 3600 System

Community Beginner ,
May 13, 2020

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Hello guys.. I'm new to this community.. I'm having some issues with rendering in premiere pro.. It is unexpectedly slow in exporting.. my export setiings are.. H.264, Youtube 1080p HD preset, Vbr pass 1 with 16 target and 40 max bitrate, rendering in maximum quality, use previews.. 
My PC specs 
Ryzen 5 3600 + Hyper 212
B450 Aorus M

16gb dual channel ram Corsair V lpx 3000mhz
240gb sata + 1 tb hdd
Cx 550
Nvidia GT 1030 2gb

Cooler Master MB511

can anyone please tell me what would be my problm ? 
Thanks in Advance! 

Here's the reason for your system being slow: Your GPU. You heard me correctly.

 

You see, that GT 1030 is so weak even by the standards of its day that it would choke the life out of almost everything else (both hardware- and software-wise) that ran on that PC. In fact, it is actually weaker than some of the on-CPU integrated graphics! It is a very poor performance match to any modern CPU, especially those that have more than 1 core and 1 thread. Your CPU has 6 cores and 12 threads. The performance ba;ance between the CPU and the GPU is way lopsided. Equipping any modern PC with a cheapo GPU is just pound-foolish, as it would make your shiny new CPU perform as slow as or slower than a 4-core/4-thread CPU that's eight years old.

 

And don't bother with the public betas: The GP108 GPU, as utilized in the GT 1030, does not support NVENC encoding at all.

 

And the reason why the GT 1030 is still priced so high ($90-plus) is that it is intended for people who still run PCs which date back to the Core 2 Duo days of 2006 who absolutely must get a GPU in such systems just to even work. Most chipsets for that CPU required a discrete GPU just to even run at all.

 

So, given its still way too high of a current street price for such a feeble GPU (it sells for close to or more than $100, the last I checked), I would have saved up another $50 or so and getting a GeForce GTX 1650 SUPER instead for that system.

 

Also, HDDs were never suitable for any kind of video editing work because of the way that professional video editing programs decode video (very unlike a simple consumer video player): Editing programs MUST decompress video to 4:4:4:4 uncompressed at extremely high bitrates just to even display on the program's monitor (all that is done in RAM, and on the fly). Unfortunately, 1 TB HDDs never could sustain transfer speeds of more than 190-ish MB/s even on the outer tracks of the disk due to the limitations of spinning platter technology. But put that through SATA (which is a half-duplex interface and not a full-duplex interface), and you'll end up with less than 100 MB/s available for either reads or writes.At typical fill levels of these HDDs, you'll end up with only about 60 to 70 MB/s available for reads or writes. That, combined with the way NLEs handle video playback, meant that the typical HDD is barely suitable for standard-definition (480p) video editing.

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Slow rendering in Premiere Pro CC with Ryzen 5 3600 System

Community Beginner ,
May 13, 2020

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Hello guys.. I'm new to this community.. I'm having some issues with rendering in premiere pro.. It is unexpectedly slow in exporting.. my export setiings are.. H.264, Youtube 1080p HD preset, Vbr pass 1 with 16 target and 40 max bitrate, rendering in maximum quality, use previews.. 
My PC specs 
Ryzen 5 3600 + Hyper 212
B450 Aorus M

16gb dual channel ram Corsair V lpx 3000mhz
240gb sata + 1 tb hdd
Cx 550
Nvidia GT 1030 2gb

Cooler Master MB511

can anyone please tell me what would be my problm ? 
Thanks in Advance! 

Here's the reason for your system being slow: Your GPU. You heard me correctly.

 

You see, that GT 1030 is so weak even by the standards of its day that it would choke the life out of almost everything else (both hardware- and software-wise) that ran on that PC. In fact, it is actually weaker than some of the on-CPU integrated graphics! It is a very poor performance match to any modern CPU, especially those that have more than 1 core and 1 thread. Your CPU has 6 cores and 12 threads. The performance ba;ance between the CPU and the GPU is way lopsided. Equipping any modern PC with a cheapo GPU is just pound-foolish, as it would make your shiny new CPU perform as slow as or slower than a 4-core/4-thread CPU that's eight years old.

 

And don't bother with the public betas: The GP108 GPU, as utilized in the GT 1030, does not support NVENC encoding at all.

 

And the reason why the GT 1030 is still priced so high ($90-plus) is that it is intended for people who still run PCs which date back to the Core 2 Duo days of 2006 who absolutely must get a GPU in such systems just to even work. Most chipsets for that CPU required a discrete GPU just to even run at all.

 

So, given its still way too high of a current street price for such a feeble GPU (it sells for close to or more than $100, the last I checked), I would have saved up another $50 or so and getting a GeForce GTX 1650 SUPER instead for that system.

 

Also, HDDs were never suitable for any kind of video editing work because of the way that professional video editing programs decode video (very unlike a simple consumer video player): Editing programs MUST decompress video to 4:4:4:4 uncompressed at extremely high bitrates just to even display on the program's monitor (all that is done in RAM, and on the fly). Unfortunately, 1 TB HDDs never could sustain transfer speeds of more than 190-ish MB/s even on the outer tracks of the disk due to the limitations of spinning platter technology. But put that through SATA (which is a half-duplex interface and not a full-duplex interface), and you'll end up with less than 100 MB/s available for either reads or writes.At typical fill levels of these HDDs, you'll end up with only about 60 to 70 MB/s available for reads or writes. That, combined with the way NLEs handle video playback, meant that the typical HDD is barely suitable for standard-definition (480p) video editing.

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May 13, 2020 0
Adobe Employee ,
May 15, 2020

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Hi samk666,

 

We're sorry about the poor experience. Several factors can affect the rendering performance like system specs, media specs, and complexity of the timeline We would need more info to diagnose the issue properly. Please let us know the specifications of media files used (format/codec, frame rate & frame size), the effects applied and the duration of  the timeline. Also, please check that the Renderer is set to Mercury Playback Engine GPU Acceleration (CUDA).

 

Thanks,

Sumeet

 

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May 15, 2020 0
Adobe Employee ,
May 15, 2020

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Hi,

You have H.264 to export, but you do not have Intel, which uses Quick Sync, so it won't be as fast as a system with an Intel CPU. You may have some luck with the public beta, which can utilize your NVIDIA card for export. Try it. 

Thanks,
Kevin

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May 15, 2020 0
LEGEND ,
May 15, 2020

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Here's the reason for your system being slow: Your GPU. You heard me correctly.

 

You see, that GT 1030 is so weak even by the standards of its day that it would choke the life out of almost everything else (both hardware- and software-wise) that ran on that PC. In fact, it is actually weaker than some of the on-CPU integrated graphics! It is a very poor performance match to any modern CPU, especially those that have more than 1 core and 1 thread. Your CPU has 6 cores and 12 threads. The performance ba;ance between the CPU and the GPU is way lopsided. Equipping any modern PC with a cheapo GPU is just pound-foolish, as it would make your shiny new CPU perform as slow as or slower than a 4-core/4-thread CPU that's eight years old.

 

And don't bother with the public betas: The GP108 GPU, as utilized in the GT 1030, does not support NVENC encoding at all.

 

And the reason why the GT 1030 is still priced so high ($90-plus) is that it is intended for people who still run PCs which date back to the Core 2 Duo days of 2006 who absolutely must get a GPU in such systems just to even work. Most chipsets for that CPU required a discrete GPU just to even run at all.

 

So, given its still way too high of a current street price for such a feeble GPU (it sells for close to or more than $100, the last I checked), I would have saved up another $50 or so and getting a GeForce GTX 1650 SUPER instead for that system.

 

Also, HDDs were never suitable for any kind of video editing work because of the way that professional video editing programs decode video (very unlike a simple consumer video player): Editing programs MUST decompress video to 4:4:4:4 uncompressed at extremely high bitrates just to even display on the program's monitor (all that is done in RAM, and on the fly). Unfortunately, 1 TB HDDs never could sustain transfer speeds of more than 190-ish MB/s even on the outer tracks of the disk due to the limitations of spinning platter technology. But put that through SATA (which is a half-duplex interface and not a full-duplex interface), and you'll end up with less than 100 MB/s available for either reads or writes.At typical fill levels of these HDDs, you'll end up with only about 60 to 70 MB/s available for reads or writes. That, combined with the way NLEs handle video playback, meant that the typical HDD is barely suitable for standard-definition (480p) video editing.

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May 15, 2020 0
Community Beginner ,
May 16, 2020

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Thank you and yes I figured it out later.. I would definitly upgreade my GPU into 1660 Super or something must have DDR6 and  6GB VRAM at least.. and will consider a NVME! 
I hope this would fix my issues with rendering speed and workflow! 

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May 16, 2020 0
LEGEND ,
May 16, 2020

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Yes. The GTX 1660 SUPER would be a good choice for your system. Even better would be an RTX 2060 or an RTX 2060 SUPER - but either one of those might cost you more money than what you were planning to spend on such an upgrade.

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May 16, 2020 1
New Here ,
Jul 14, 2020

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Can You clarify.. did you solved the problem? Im planing in buing ryzen 5 3600 but those problems with slow rendering is Headache.

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Jul 14, 2020 0
Community Beginner ,
Jul 14, 2020

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Yeah I guess it's all about my GPU.. 
but If you're going with Ryzen 5 3600 then I would suggest you to consider a good aftermarket cooling.. Do not trust the stock cooler.. I was getting 90c in rendering.. Now with Cooler Master Hyper 212 LED I'm getting 68-73c in rendring.. 
 I'm using DaVinci Resolve right now... even with that poor GPU I'm getting awesome performance in DaVinci than Premiere.. 

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Jul 14, 2020 0
LEGEND ,
Jul 14, 2020

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I agree that one should have a decent cooler. Unfortunately, the stock AMD Wraith Stealth cooler that comes with that Ryzen 5 3600 is inadequate for anything more than a 4-core/8-thread CPU. Even the upgraded Wraith Prism cooler that comes with the higher-end AMD CPUs from the 3600X to the 3900X (but not the 3950X) is marginal for my Ryzen 7 3800X, with the CPU reaching about 84c in rendering. (The 3950X does not come with a stock cooler at all; an aftermarket cooler, preferably an AIO liquid cooler, is required for that CPU.)

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Jul 14, 2020 0
New Here ,
Jul 14, 2020

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Thanks a lot 🙂 And how about adobe LIVE preview with this cpu? Does it smooth while editing saying  4k/30 frames

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Jul 14, 2020 0
samk666 LATEST
Community Beginner ,
Jul 14, 2020

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Can't help you with this I haven't tried any 4k RAW footage,, Because my GPU is weak! 

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Jul 14, 2020 0