Utilize Date Created

Community Beginner ,
Aug 30, 2018

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Hello...

I commonly work with pictures and videos from various sources.

When editing an event, the first thing I have to do is create a timeline to line up all the clips (usually a track for each source device).

It's a time-consuming process, as the files never have timecode.

What they do have, though, is meticulous Date Created fields.

I use a program called Advanced Renamer to set that field to Date Taken (for pictures) or extrapolate the date/time from the filename (for those that have it).

Oftentimes, I rename the files to YYYYMMDD-HHMMSSxx-Source (where xx is whatever is smaller than seconds).

Given that I do all that work, that doesn't seem to be useful for anything (except my anal retentiveness), can Date Created be used to set timecode or automatically line clips up (it would be really cool if it could be used for multicam)?

JJ

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Utilize Date Created

Community Beginner ,
Aug 30, 2018

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Hello...

I commonly work with pictures and videos from various sources.

When editing an event, the first thing I have to do is create a timeline to line up all the clips (usually a track for each source device).

It's a time-consuming process, as the files never have timecode.

What they do have, though, is meticulous Date Created fields.

I use a program called Advanced Renamer to set that field to Date Taken (for pictures) or extrapolate the date/time from the filename (for those that have it).

Oftentimes, I rename the files to YYYYMMDD-HHMMSSxx-Source (where xx is whatever is smaller than seconds).

Given that I do all that work, that doesn't seem to be useful for anything (except my anal retentiveness), can Date Created be used to set timecode or automatically line clips up (it would be really cool if it could be used for multicam)?

JJ

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Aug 30, 2018 0
Engaged ,
Aug 30, 2018

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It is not possible. The only thing you can do is sort your clips by name - as you probably know - and so have them in the right order...

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Aug 30, 2018 0
Community Beginner ,
Aug 30, 2018

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While I agree with that sentiment...

If the files don't have timecode (I've never had one with) or audio (I've had multiple files with no audio or audio that's too quiet to matter), then those ways don't work.

Even if they aren't aligned in a frame-accurate fashion, it's way faster and mostly as good as I would get it with hours of moving clips around.

Plus, what about pictures?

I put pictures on the timeline, many times.

JJ

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Aug 30, 2018 0
Community Beginner ,
Aug 31, 2018

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Another useful purpose for this is not just for multicam, but just lining out hours (or days) worth of footage.

Then, you can chop things up as desired.

It gives you a chance to look at the whole thing, though.

Is there not a way to turn that Date Created data into timecode?

JJ

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Aug 31, 2018 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 31, 2018

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If I read your question correctly this is what I would do. It's similar to what I have done in the past. I would batch rename your clips to the date and time (I've used various programs to do this by looking at the clip or picture's metadata). Then load the clips into your project and sort the sequentially in your project bin. Select all your clips and go to your dropdown menus and choose Clip > Automate to Sequence... You'll find several preferences to choose from. This should lay out all of your clips in the order they were taken into a timeline sequence for you to edit.

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Aug 31, 2018 1
Community Beginner ,
Aug 31, 2018

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Apparently, you have to create said sequence, first.

Screenshot (16).png

Screenshot (17).png

JJ

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Aug 31, 2018 0
Community Beginner ,
Aug 31, 2018

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Well, that is closer to what I am talking about.

Ideally, they would be spaced in time and on separate tracks per source.

I'm sure that's a tall order, but still.

I assume I could just select the each sources items and automate them to their own tracks (or even sequences), but the timing is still the issue.

JJ

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Aug 31, 2018 0
Community Beginner ,
Sep 03, 2018

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They said it couldn't be done, but I did it!

https://1drv.ms/u/s!AlRf6b1u0N2PubRTXNXrhgj1RKwmbA

This reads the directories that are siblings of the batch file.
It goes into each directory and looks for *.mp4 or *.mov (you could add any formats you want, but I'm just dealing with normal DSLR/phone/etc... files).
WMIC (comes with Windows 10, but not sure about other versions) gets Date Created (you must have good Date Created for it all to work correctly).
FFMPEG (path is hard-linked - change to your preference) inserts date/time information into a new file (just a copy, not re-encoded - unless you use one of the commented-out options).
FFMPEG also uses the date/time and directory in the new filename.
NirCmd (path is hard-linked - change to your preference) uses the date/time information and changed Date Created for the copied file (since it would have fresh date/time information).

Some background information on how I organize things (if you're different, then you may need to adjust the batch).
I have a directory for the event and subdirectories for the sources.
For instance (this is all random and not representative of what I have or do)…

JukeJointGig-20180212

    BlackmagicUrsaMini

        021218121553.mp4

    CanonXl1

        File0001.mp4

    Htc10

        IMG_0142.mp4

    SonyNx80

        20180212-121426.mov

This might produce a bunch of files like this...

JukeJointGig-20180212-Transcoded

    20180212-120432-CanonXl1.mp4

    20180212-121426-SonyNx80.mp4

    20180212-121553-BlackmagicUrsaMini.mp4

    20180212-122102-Htc10.mp4

Each of those files would have Date Created, creation_time metadata, and timecode metadata matching the information in the filename.

There is one thing that may be worth noting...
You really need to pay attention to time zones and how the original creation_time metadata is stored.
I have a bunch of footage from a trip to Colorado (I live in Missouri).
Some of the devices have internet access and updated with the time zone change.
Others did not, so footage shot at the same time may have times that are an hour different (or days that are a day different, if around midnight).
Some devices stored an offset from GMT and others didn't.
That is something that should be worked out before doing this process, but it's worth noting.

I doubt anyone will have any use for this, but I'm very happy with myself.
Hehehe...
JJ

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Sep 03, 2018 1
Community Beginner ,
Sep 05, 2018

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One problem, that I'm noticing, is that Premiere Pro seems to be misreading the timecode.

The timecode in my files should be exactly like the filename/date created (I use the same variables in the batch file).

But, Premiere Pro seems to be adjusting the timecode based on the framerate.

The files with variable framerates (notice some timecodes are right and some are wrong).

TimecodeOff.png

The same files, but with Modify - Interpret Footage - 30fps (starting timecode changes).

TimecodeOff-30.png

TimecodeOff-30-2.png

Now, I can understand the ending timecode changing (since it would be making the clip longer or shorter).
Why would it be changing the starting timecode, though?

It looks like I may have to adjust my batch to re-encode all the files, so that they all match whatever I want to sequences to be.

JJ

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Sep 05, 2018 0
Community Beginner ,
Dec 22, 2020

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That probably wouldn't work well. Creation date is not that perfect. Creation date can be off if the clips come from multiple cameras, if the card in one camera is slower than another, etc. I've even synced two cameras and started them both with the same remote and they still were off by a few frames. Even if you could get it very close, you'd still have to touch each clip to adjust for those few frames.

 

So many of the issues we deal with in editing are caused by the production crew not using a shoot-for-the-edit workflow or thinking "they'll fix it in post." A few minutes (or dollars) spent by the production team can save hours for the editorial team. 

 

So I'd suggest making sure all clips have reference audio. This can be done using the internal mics if the camera has one, or just adding a cheap mic to each rig. Much cheaper and easier than making sure each camera has synced timecode. Then using the sync sound workflow built in to Premiere. Or better yet, use a tool like PluralEyes. It really is almost miraculous. 

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Dec 22, 2020 0