Highlighted

Video Quality is Poor After Exporting w/ Grain Effect

New Here ,
Oct 15, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Hi everyone,

 

I'm working on a short film currently, and I'm trying to add a really cool grain effect, where I automate the effect so that color grain is either added in from 0-100% or removed from 100-0% over the title and credits. When I make this effect in the Premiere Pro, the preview looks just fine, with high quality captions over a high quality screen of grain. Yet, once I export, both the captions and grain become heavily pixelated.

 

Here are shots of the Title Screen and Credits in the Premiere Pro preview:

 

front screen in app.pngend screen in app.png

 

And here are shots of the same screens once they are exported:

 

front screen on YT.pngend screen on YT.png

 

I've tried exporting with a variety of settings, including smaller bitrates and larger bitrates, but here's the most recent attempt:

 

export settings.png

 

Am I doing something wrong? Is there a way to get this effect without it lowering the quality once exported? Any and all help is appreciated. Thank you.

Adobe Community Professional
Correct answer by Steve Griffiths | Adobe Community Professional

Pretty much any compressed codec is going to struggle with keeping this looking good. Codecs like H.264 break a video image down into macroblocks and average out the contents of that macroblock to reduce the data rate. That's why you can see 'squares' in the compressed noise in your exported video.

In your case - using animated noise - EVERY pixel over the entire image changes from one frame to another.

Full frame noise is a compression algorithms worst nightmare.

Effectively if any compression is applied to your video you will start to see the problem you are experiencing. The more compression the worse it looks.

Even with a high data rate (I tested 50Mbps) using H.264 the results are still not great. H.265 encoding looked slightly better (at lower data rates).

My Prores (standard) test look OK. Using Prores HQ even better. And Prores 444 should be almost indistinguishable from the original, though I did not test this.

 

However, even if you manage to get a good quality export using a better codec (Prores, DnX etc) if you plan to upload to Youtube/Vimeo or send through any additional compression - the result will be back to looking like crap.

 

Sorry to not bring better news 🙂

TOPICS
Effects and Titles, Export

Views

81

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more

Video Quality is Poor After Exporting w/ Grain Effect

New Here ,
Oct 15, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Hi everyone,

 

I'm working on a short film currently, and I'm trying to add a really cool grain effect, where I automate the effect so that color grain is either added in from 0-100% or removed from 100-0% over the title and credits. When I make this effect in the Premiere Pro, the preview looks just fine, with high quality captions over a high quality screen of grain. Yet, once I export, both the captions and grain become heavily pixelated.

 

Here are shots of the Title Screen and Credits in the Premiere Pro preview:

 

front screen in app.pngend screen in app.png

 

And here are shots of the same screens once they are exported:

 

front screen on YT.pngend screen on YT.png

 

I've tried exporting with a variety of settings, including smaller bitrates and larger bitrates, but here's the most recent attempt:

 

export settings.png

 

Am I doing something wrong? Is there a way to get this effect without it lowering the quality once exported? Any and all help is appreciated. Thank you.

Adobe Community Professional
Correct answer by Steve Griffiths | Adobe Community Professional

Pretty much any compressed codec is going to struggle with keeping this looking good. Codecs like H.264 break a video image down into macroblocks and average out the contents of that macroblock to reduce the data rate. That's why you can see 'squares' in the compressed noise in your exported video.

In your case - using animated noise - EVERY pixel over the entire image changes from one frame to another.

Full frame noise is a compression algorithms worst nightmare.

Effectively if any compression is applied to your video you will start to see the problem you are experiencing. The more compression the worse it looks.

Even with a high data rate (I tested 50Mbps) using H.264 the results are still not great. H.265 encoding looked slightly better (at lower data rates).

My Prores (standard) test look OK. Using Prores HQ even better. And Prores 444 should be almost indistinguishable from the original, though I did not test this.

 

However, even if you manage to get a good quality export using a better codec (Prores, DnX etc) if you plan to upload to Youtube/Vimeo or send through any additional compression - the result will be back to looking like crap.

 

Sorry to not bring better news 🙂

TOPICS
Effects and Titles, Export

Views

82

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Oct 15, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 15, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Turn off hardware endoding and try again.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Oct 15, 2020 0
New Here ,
Oct 15, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Thank you for the quick response and suggestion, but unfortunately it's still really poor quality once it's exported.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Oct 15, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 15, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

How high have you pushed the bitrate? You might need significantly more than 10 to get that looking decent.

 

Neil

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Oct 15, 2020 0
New Here ,
Oct 15, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I pushed the bitrate incrementally. Starting from "Match Source - Medium Bitrate" and then manually raising both the target bitrate and max bitrate as high as they can go, but the issue still persists.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Oct 15, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 15, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Have you tried exporting to a Final file in a full intraframe codec like ProRes, with Premiere's export option to re-import checked. Then from that file, make your H.264 deliverable?

 

Neil

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Oct 15, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 15, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Pretty much any compressed codec is going to struggle with keeping this looking good. Codecs like H.264 break a video image down into macroblocks and average out the contents of that macroblock to reduce the data rate. That's why you can see 'squares' in the compressed noise in your exported video.

In your case - using animated noise - EVERY pixel over the entire image changes from one frame to another.

Full frame noise is a compression algorithms worst nightmare.

Effectively if any compression is applied to your video you will start to see the problem you are experiencing. The more compression the worse it looks.

Even with a high data rate (I tested 50Mbps) using H.264 the results are still not great. H.265 encoding looked slightly better (at lower data rates).

My Prores (standard) test look OK. Using Prores HQ even better. And Prores 444 should be almost indistinguishable from the original, though I did not test this.

 

However, even if you manage to get a good quality export using a better codec (Prores, DnX etc) if you plan to upload to Youtube/Vimeo or send through any additional compression - the result will be back to looking like crap.

 

Sorry to not bring better news 🙂

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Oct 15, 2020 3
New Here ,
Oct 16, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

That's okay, thanks for your response! I sort-of assumed something like this would be the case, just needed to confirm to make sure I wasn't doing something stupid. I'll test it with those other formats and see the results. Do you know if there is a similar effect I could use that isn't so heavy, or a way that I could alter the effect? If not, it's alright, I'll probably just end up scrapping the noise.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Oct 16, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 16, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Never tried this but - see if you can make the noise pixels bigger. I'm guessing they are currently pixel sized. See if you have the option to increase the noise size to say 4 pixels (or bigger?). Going from 1 to 4 pixels might significantly reduce data load. Also see if taking out the colour in the noise has any benefit to the compressed result.

You could also reduce the effective frame rate of the 'noise' so it's only changes every 2nd frame?

No idea if any of this will help or if it just ends up ruining the look you are after. Though if you do find a solution that improves what you are trying to achieve, would love to hear about it.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Oct 16, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 16, 2020

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Might spoil the effect but you could try adding some blur to it.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Oct 16, 2020 0