Where to apply Unsharp Mask Effect.

New Here ,
Jun 08, 2019 Jun 08, 2019

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I have a question, where Unsharp Mask should be applied:

Option 1. In the same layer where I do color grading/corrections.

Option 2. Above the layer where I do color grading/corrections.

Option 3. Below the layer where I do color grading/corrections.

Thank you.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 08, 2019 Jun 08, 2019

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Where it gives the effects you like.

Neil

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 08, 2019 Jun 08, 2019

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I could give a bit more information  I suppose.

Sharpening is a sharp-edged tool. Pun intended and appropriate. What specifically are you sharpening and why are are sharpening that bit?

Until you know the answers to those questions you can't know exactly when and how to apply sharpening effects.

Essentially you sharpen where you need to and only when you need to. And for a specific part of the image. Sharpening is something that can so rapidly lead to artifacts and banding and blocking. Halos.

Neil

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 09, 2019 Jun 09, 2019

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Why do you need to apply unsharpen mask. Is this just for one clip or entire timeline?

Unsharpen mask can at times do more harm then good.

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New Here ,
Jun 09, 2019 Jun 09, 2019

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It needs to be applied to the entire timeline. I record with a GoPro Hero 7 Black with sharpness in low mode. So I  need to apply some sharpness in premiere.

Thank you.

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Guide ,
Jun 09, 2019 Jun 09, 2019

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That's a tricky question. I'll put in my 2 cents.

I have a full chip DSLR (35mm equiv.) with a bunch of lenses. I use them (with adapter) on a BMPCC MFT type camera. The crop factor of that is more than 2X.  Almost 3X ( 2.88). It means that the very center portion of image is hitting the chip ( tiny part of whole image from lens). THAT means that if the optics of the lens are not the very best in the whole world the images may be less than really SHARP. And THAT means I have to deal with it somehow.

I now use Resolve most of the time, so I use different tools to do this stuff ( enhance clarity) ..  namely contrast/pivot , midtone detail, and so on … don't recall an unsharp mask being in that program. I think you can do it manually with parallel nodes and merger thing.. but never did it.

Using PPro

a) only do it on a clip by clip basis AS needed. If a landscape at 1000 mm looks slightly not super sharp nobody cares and nobody will notice.  IF it's a close up of someone and their eyes are slightly out, I will sharpen. Clip by clip.

b) Do it last almost all the time.

c) Do it EXTREMELY judiciously... ( turn it on and off so you can see what it is doing … comparing without sharpening, and with sharpening. ERR on the side of NOT ENOUGH sharpening.

For example, if the eyes seem not sharp and I decide to sharpen, if I just manage to take the curse off it ( where it is not so noticeable) than I am a happy clam.

The more subtle influences effecting and in conjunction with sharpening...

If you warp stabilize sharpening puts undo extra burden on process. Hence do sharpen last. Same with color grading or changing luminance and balance.

If you use denoiser you are basically undoing the unsharp mask

If something is so bad ( out of focus ) see if you can live without it.... throw it away, rather than try the impossible. If it's that bad it's gonna look stupid anyway ..  it's a fine line...

In photoshop I never used more than 30 for unsharp mask

No specific workflow ( order of things ) is ever gonna work all the time... so go with the flow and picture what you have to do and then decide when to do it ( what order ). You'll find it comes kinda naturally after a while, and if something doesn't work you can undo it, etc. So don't be scared to try stuff.

Finally, don't forget... you are the only one ( unless someone else shot it ) who knows what the original stuff looks like. People who watch TV, for example, don't KNOW what the original stuff looks like, so they can't base a critique of the editing and grading on any sort of comparison. They never saw the source. They never saw what 'couldn't be used' because of boom mic or boom shadow in the shot, etc.

They won't know what YOUR original stuff was... only you know it.  So don't be overly critical and super perfect with clarity. Most people won't be as critical of things as much as you are.

Don't use sharpening if you can avoid it... And make sure you are on a frame that is a good one...( not blurry due to motion ).

Good luck !

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Guide ,
Jun 09, 2019 Jun 09, 2019

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I posted before you posted your mssg about go pro.

what fps and shutter speed are you shooting ? If you go to 60 fps and 120th/ sec shutter does it look sharper to you ??  Do a short test if you have to... just holding the camera … if it's on drone you don't have to fly it, just pan the camera by hand...

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New Here ,
Jun 09, 2019 Jun 09, 2019

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Yes, I have made a lot of tests. I always set fps in 60 and shutter in auto. The footage with low sharpness looks pretty good, but it looks better when some sharpness is added in Premiere, that makes (when compared both) the footage with no sharpness looks blurry.

Thank you.

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Guide ,
Jun 09, 2019 Jun 09, 2019

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I guess I would do all your edit stuff and color etc.. and then add the adj. layer above everything with the unsharp mask and export.

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Enthusiast ,
Jun 09, 2019 Jun 09, 2019

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One thing to remember is that Unsharp mask is a non-accelerated effect, so placing such an effect in "wrong" place can slowdown rendering significantly. Well, at least in my experience. More details here:

Re: Order of filters/effects and drop in CUDA-rendering speed, is it a bug or a feature?

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Community Beginner ,
Jan 23, 2021 Jan 23, 2021

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@ruminir Did you ever determine a solution for this? Have you come to an opinion about what works best for applying sharpness to GoPro footage? I posted a similar question recently and I'm looking for more details about what other GoPro users are doing for sharpening after applying the Protune setting for Sharpness to "Low". Would really appreciate any details you can share with me.  My question is posted here if you can add a response: https://community.adobe.com/t5/premiere-pro/best-method-for-sharpening-gopro-protuned-footage-in-pre...

Thanks!

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 23, 2021 Jan 23, 2021

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My 2 cents, having watched the discussion so far ... and that's about what anyone's adice on sharpening is worth if they're not sitting at your computer looking at the media.

 

First, the comment earlier about making sure you set things with a good sharp frame to begin with is SO spot-on. And make sure you're only checking sharpness on the things that are clearly the sharpest things in the image.

 

Next ... if the media all needs sharpening, you need to do it in multiple small steps. I would apply a basic level in the Lumetri Creative tab with the sharpening tool there. Enough to make a slight difference in the sharpest things in the image, when viewed at 100%. This would be the same over all clips. You might make a Lumetri preset that includes this set to what you need, along with any other settings that seem to apply to the vast majority of clips from that camera ... would save time.

 

When ready to export, you could then go through the sequence and where you really, really needed more sharpening, add a bit more in an added Lumetri effect at the bottom of the effects control panel layer stack. Again, barely enough to see the difference when you toggle on./off that instance of Lumetri with the image showing at 100% in the Program monitor or transmit-out.

 

Video when watched is actually not all "that" sharp, especially compared to stills images. Don't judge sharpness with the image paused. Only judge sharpness while it's moving, and preferably with a monitor you can set to the same refresh rate (or double) as your sequence frame-rate.

 

Film certainly isn't "sharp". A few of the colorists I know who are awesome at getting a 'filmic' look include a very slight lessening of sharpness as their very first step to any digital-camera produced image. When they apply a "grain" filter, it's either just after the de-sharpening or near the end of the process.

 

Either way, it's to ensure that the basic image is de-sharpened and then grain is applied that is not de-sharpened.

 

Neil

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New Here ,
Jul 04, 2021 Jul 04, 2021

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Good

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