Workflow advice and discussion

Community Beginner ,
Dec 08, 2020

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TLDR - upgraded ky editing maxhine. Now ita faster do I still need to transcode footage?

 

whats an optimum workflow for keeping as high quality footage as possible?

I used to use smart rendering (mp4/mov to prores. Edit. Generate previews. Export master. Transcode master. Upload) 

 

Hi everyone, 

 

For about 4 years ive been editing on my laptop (i7 something, 16gb ram, 920mGPU) and finally upgraded to a new desktop (3900xt, 64gb ram, 1650 super gpu, ssds, nvme etc etc) 

 

All my adobe apps are now so much faster and exporting a 4k 8 minute video which used to be a 5 hour task of generating previews, exporting a master then transcoding took 15 mins!!! 

 

So before I used to use smart rendering as a way of not having my machine stutter trying to edit anything. 

Is it still advisable to transcode? 

If so into what? 

Prores, cineform? 

 

Im looking for least amount of degradation. 

 

After editing should I still export a master file for later use? 

 

Id mainly chop these master files up into social media posts later so not for anything super hi res....or massively important! 

 

Any advice or a peek inside your workflow would be great. 

 

Dave

 

 

 

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Workflow advice and discussion

Community Beginner ,
Dec 08, 2020

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TLDR - upgraded ky editing maxhine. Now ita faster do I still need to transcode footage?

 

whats an optimum workflow for keeping as high quality footage as possible?

I used to use smart rendering (mp4/mov to prores. Edit. Generate previews. Export master. Transcode master. Upload) 

 

Hi everyone, 

 

For about 4 years ive been editing on my laptop (i7 something, 16gb ram, 920mGPU) and finally upgraded to a new desktop (3900xt, 64gb ram, 1650 super gpu, ssds, nvme etc etc) 

 

All my adobe apps are now so much faster and exporting a 4k 8 minute video which used to be a 5 hour task of generating previews, exporting a master then transcoding took 15 mins!!! 

 

So before I used to use smart rendering as a way of not having my machine stutter trying to edit anything. 

Is it still advisable to transcode? 

If so into what? 

Prores, cineform? 

 

Im looking for least amount of degradation. 

 

After editing should I still export a master file for later use? 

 

Id mainly chop these master files up into social media posts later so not for anything super hi res....or massively important! 

 

Any advice or a peek inside your workflow would be great. 

 

Dave

 

 

 

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Editing, Performance

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Dec 08, 2020 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Dec 08, 2020

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Transcoding is a step that can be useful for a number of things, most dependent on either the hardware in use or the media concerned. Sometimes it's a pairing of the two that makes t-coding useful.

 

So it's very much a "it depends" decision. With a much better machine, you may not need to t-code some things you routinely did before. But may choose to still t-code some things for best overall workflow.

 

You may find that in applying multiple major effects on a clip, that a render & replace option may still be wise. Such as say Warp stabilizer and Lumetri. Apply Warp and r&r. Then apply Lumetri, and the timeline will play much smoother and you don't have to worry about Premiere choosing to re-analyze.

 

VFR media is another issue. Some you may be able to use ok, but some will still need converting to CFR in Handbrake. I've got a batch going right now, as there are several clips that will be used in a multicam with some BMPCC4K clips. They should all be as similar as possible for most stable, predictable results.

 

Neil

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Community Beginner ,
Dec 09, 2020

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Thanks Neil. 

 

Could you just clarify what VFR and CFR (constant and variable frame rate I assume) mean?

 

Do you mean using different frame rates in the same sequence?

 

I'm shooting on a canon 90d so sometimes include 120fps and maybe some 60fps but all the aroll and multi cam stuff I shoot is 24fps 

 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Dec 08, 2020

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Neils advice is spot on.

 

In a post intensive TV network environment we have transcoding workflows for longform, long timeframe edits and also for shorter form fast turnaround shows. Transcoding is valuable to prevent issues down the line.

 

On the corporate and social side I tend to not transcode anything and just deal with everything in it's native format.

However still export a master file (in Prores 422 or ProresHQ) for later use.

 

The trancode formats we use are Prores422, CineForm, AVC-Intra 100 and DNX120. Some of these are used to meet specific workflow needs. Prores and Cineform work well when you have a cross-platform environment. DNX is useful for us as it works well for multi-cam edits. AVC-Intra is used on long form stuff where there's lots of footage and is an OK trade off on size and quality.

 

In your instance I'd for sure be experimenting with NOT transcoding and working with native footage and see how you go.

If it works OK then there's just once less step to do (and you'll need less storage).

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Community Beginner ,
Dec 09, 2020

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Thanks Steve. 

 

Its really great to hear from professionals on what you do and why. 

 

With re. Master files I guess it really doesn't matter what the source footage format is when I export a master prores 422 file? 

I.e I won't get a better result using prores source files when I export? 

 

Also agree on the storage! Now I'm shooting in 4k those transcoded files become massive and are taking up a lot of space

 

Thanks again

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Dec 11, 2020

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With re. Master files I guess it really doesn't matter what the source footage format is when I export a master prores 422 file? I.e I won't get a better result using prores source files when I export? 

 

Correct.

... Transcode to Prores before editing and export a Prores master OR stay native for editing but export final Prores master - both will provide effectively the same quality final program.

To be precise - any transcoding between formats introduces some, albeit usually small, quality loss. The more times you transcode the more quality loss or 'contatenation' (as it's called) is introduced. 

Higher loss is introduced with intraframe compressed formats - like H.264/MP4 etc. and is even more noticable when these fomats are then re-edited and re-exported. If you are mastering with (say) Prores 422 which is an interframe compressed format - next time you edit with that file - and stay in Prores 422 for the re-export,  then there will be no quality loss**.

 

* Any modification during editing i.e. grading, adding text etc. would cause re-encoding and potential quality loss - though again ususally minor.

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Community Beginner ,
Dec 09, 2020

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Thank you both for the detailed replies! 

 

Ill experiment (now that I have the pc to cope!) And workout whats best for me. 

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