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Zooming and panning within a fixed-size frame

Community Beginner ,
Aug 26, 2020

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I want zoom and pan on a still image, but within a fixed-size frame that does not fill the entire screen. Everything I try, including masking, seems to want to apply the scale and position without regard an outside limit. I'm new to this. Any suggestions?

I'm using Premiere Pro.

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Correct answer by Christian_Z1 | Adobe Community Professional

Step 1: Nest your still image

Step 2: double click on the nested sequence

Step 3: animate with keyframe. Don't resize

Step 4: go back to the master sequence

Step 5: click once on the nested sequence, resize and change position.

 

Here's a video explaining those steps:

https://youtu.be/C5CyLvsL8mM

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Zooming and panning within a fixed-size frame

Community Beginner ,
Aug 26, 2020

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I want zoom and pan on a still image, but within a fixed-size frame that does not fill the entire screen. Everything I try, including masking, seems to want to apply the scale and position without regard an outside limit. I'm new to this. Any suggestions?

I'm using Premiere Pro.

Adobe Community Professional
Correct answer by Christian_Z1 | Adobe Community Professional

Step 1: Nest your still image

Step 2: double click on the nested sequence

Step 3: animate with keyframe. Don't resize

Step 4: go back to the master sequence

Step 5: click once on the nested sequence, resize and change position.

 

Here's a video explaining those steps:

https://youtu.be/C5CyLvsL8mM

Topics

Editing, How to

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 26, 2020

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 26, 2020

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Might also look at the Offset effect.

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Community Beginner ,
Aug 26, 2020

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Thanks, but I know how to pan and zoom (position and scale). What I don't know is how to do is stop the outside edges of the photograph from moving. In Indesign, I have a frame and a photo. Either can be resized. When the photo is bigger than the frame, then it only shows up to the edges of frame.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 26, 2020

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I’ve been using InDesign a lot longer than I’ve used Premiere Pro. Based on your other replies, nesting should get you there in Premiere Pro if the nested sequence has portrait dimensions. In the example below, the main sequence is 1920 x 1080 pixels, and inside it is a second sequence of portrait dimensions 608 x 1080, visible by the yellow background I gave it. You can slide or scale that PAN text all you want in that nested sequence, it will never show up outside that yellow box. The reason is that the PAN text is inside the nested vertical sequence, so its visibility is limited by the 608-pixel wide portrait sequence that it is walled into. 

 

nested-pan.jpg

 

This is similar to how, in InDesign, you would drop a vertical rectangular frame on a page, and the contents of that frame can be moved around in it (with the Direct Selection tool or Content Grabber) without exceeding the frame size. The frame is not as wide as the page, so content visibility is limited by the frame size. The difference is that there are no “pages” in Premiere Pro, instead you have the width and height of a sequence. Just treat sequences as like InDesign frames; each can contain its own contents that are limited by the area you defined when you entered dimensions in Sequence > Sequence Settings for each of the nested sequences.

 

To make this, just create a vertical sequence and then add it to the main sequence, just like adding another video clip.

 

When you do this, you have to pay attention to which sequence you need to edit. To pan and zoom the PAN text, you must edit it in the sequence that contains it — the vertical nested sequence, not the main wide sequence. That’s easy, just double-click that sequence in the Timeline or Project panel. Changes will update in the main sequence as soon as the nested sequence is edited. If you have ever edited Smart Objects in Photoshop, it’s kind of like that.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 26, 2020

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build the move with the image full frame and then next it and scale it down...

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 26, 2020

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sorry, I meant "nest it"

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Community Beginner ,
Aug 26, 2020

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The aspect ratio of the item I want to pan and zoom on is a portrait picture image. I cannot use the video aspect ratio of the timeline to do what you suggest. I want to start a sequence with the full portrait picture well within the borders of the video aspect ratio. Then, as I zoom and pan in on the image, I do not want the edges of the picture to move, but rather the picture to zoom and pan within its original footprint in the image.

 

I also don't think nesting would make any difference. That seems like shuffeling deck chairs.

 

When I use a mask, the mask grows with the zoom.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 26, 2020

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Try nesting. If the nest pixel dimensions match the image it will work
unless I'm missing something. The same thing as prebuilding the
animation, exporting and then using that as your clip

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Community Beginner ,
Aug 26, 2020

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Whether I did nesting operations correctly or not, I can't say. But it didn't solve the problem. The only thing I've found that works so far is exporting, bringing back video, and then sizing and placing it where I want it.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 26, 2020

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nesting, if you're doing it properly should work the same as exporting and reimporting...  If you want to figure out the proper workflow post back but if you're happy with just exporting and reimporting, that's fine.   Of course, I may be wrong...  it happens everyonceinawhile...  

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Community Beginner ,
Aug 27, 2020

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My problem is that there are 100s of images I want to put above other video -- and each one has it's own aspect ratio and pixel size. I'm very interested in finding a workable solution in using nesting. I haven't been able to get the desired result on my own. The direct crop on the picure would seem to be best, but the crop grows with the image rather than holding its starting position. If I add key frames to the crop, then I end up having to guess what the ending point should be in percentage points--almost not possible. Otherwize, cropping works great, and setting an end size for the crop is simply too inexact. (masking grows the same way).

 

If there were some way to just the crop from growing with the image scale, then it would work. Or, I'm happy to learn more about nesting if you think that's the way to go.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 27, 2020

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Is this the kind of thing you’re after? If not, say some more about what you need. If this does show what you need, then I’ll tell you how it got set up in a few easy steps without entering any numbers or doing any math. I’m going by what you said about it being many images of different sizes, and you want to minimize the amount of setup for each because there are so many. The inset images are stills, but the steps for video would be no different.

 

nested-pan-and-zoom-demo.gif

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 27, 2020

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This new forum software removed the helpful Delete button we used to have, but you can  modify your post using the '...more' button:

MyerPj_0-1598562599200.png

 

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Community Beginner ,
Aug 27, 2020

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Thanks for responding. If those insets are still that are being panned and zoomed while in a fixed-size bounding box, then that looks like what I want to do. So far, the best solution I've seen is work the images each individually, export each one, and bring the resulting video back into the main project. I'd like to find a better way.

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Adobe Employee ,
Aug 27, 2020

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Nesting isn't faster, KM?

Thanks,
Kevin

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Community Beginner ,
Aug 27, 2020

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Kevin, I tried nesting but did not achieve my objective. Perhaps I didn't do things in the right order. After nesting everything was the same. Are you aware of any tutorial that shows someone achieving what I'm trying to do. Conrad's demo above is very nice, but I don't yet know how to achieve it.

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Community Beginner ,
Aug 28, 2020

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Conrad, how did you do this balloon trick? There should be something to be learned by looking at this project.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 28, 2020

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There’s no trick, it’s the same nested sequence principle we’ve been discussing. Each of the balloons is a still image aanimated within its own sequence, then added to the full frame sequence.

 

I will put together some kind of demo of it soon, when I have a little more time.

 

[Update: Christian_Z1 uploaded a demo that shows this very well, so now I don’t have to. Thank you Christian_Z1!]

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 27, 2020

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Drop a adjustment layer over the image and add the CROP effect.

now you can pan and zoom the image without disturbing the edges.

afbeelding.png

afbeelding.png

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Community Beginner ,
Aug 27, 2020

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Again, I don't know Premier as well as Photoshop and InDesign. This suggestion doesn't seem to work because although the crop does stop the edges from zooming, it also applys to the video layer that's playing below the image.

 

Of course I tried crop on the track with the image on it. When I do that, the crop grows with the image rather than holding its starting position. If I add key frames to the crop, then I end up having to guess what the ending point should be in percentage points--almost not possible. If there were some way to just the crop from growing with the image scale, then it would work. Any ideas out there?

 

So far, exporting the image and then bringing it back in again seems to be the only thing that works at my skill level. My problem is that there are 100s of images I want to put above other video -- and each one has it's own aspect ratio and pixel size.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 27, 2020

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if you'd like to attach a premiere project with  the appropriate image file with the behavior you'd like to correct, I'll see if nesting will solve the problem.  It should...  If I'm not clear on what I'd need, post back...

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Community Beginner ,
Aug 27, 2020

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mg, I'm not sure that my file would make any difference to the answer. Look at Conrad C's video clip above in this thread. Any 10 second video video clip and any still image to put on top of it should do. Then zoom and pan the still image without changing its footprint. It seems there must be a simple way to do this. Either I'm not sure how to do a nest correctly or something else. When I apply a crop or a mask, they simply grow with the zoom, and continued to do the same after the nesting. It is possible I'm not doing the nesting correctly, but I haven't found any help or tutorial to help me with that.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 27, 2020

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Will see what I can do tomorrow morning.

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Community Beginner ,
Aug 27, 2020

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Thank you. I appreciate you and any help I can get. I a family historian and have been working on photos and publishing for many years. I've used InDesign and Photoshop to do books and a family website. Now I'm turning to 14 DVDs filled with digitized 16 and 8mm film and old home videos. I started a Mathia - Matthia Family website 25 years ago before Adobe even dreamt of Dreamweaver they had another program they acquired.

www.mathia.org

www.matthia.org

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 27, 2020

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so if I take a vertical photo on my phone and bring it in to premiere and put it over a horizontal video and animate it, and the cropping doesn't change, you'll be golden?  Just want to make sure that I've got a good handle on this.  It's been a fair amount of back and forth...  Old family photos are great.  I edited a piece a few years ago for a client that had home movies from the 1920's. amazing stuff.   

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Community Beginner ,
Aug 28, 2020

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If by "animate" you mean set position and scale with keyframes, then yes. You might look at the exchange with Conrad. I've been successful on bringing in photos with their original aspect ratio as individual sequences. What I haven't been able to do is get them onto the main video timeline and still retain the ability to fiddle with their position, scale and duration -- along with keeping them in the bounds of their original size.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 28, 2020

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So you've pre-built your still animation in its own premiere sequence?
Find that sequence in its bin and drag that sequence from the bin to the
timeline
of your complete assembly. That will nest it. To adjust the animation
double click on the nest in the containing sequence and it will open in a
new tab in the timeline and you can adjust the animation . Make sense?

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Community Beginner ,
Aug 28, 2020

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If I convert the sequence of the still photo to a nest, then I can bring it into the main video sequence.. The problem is that it covers the whole video. If I rescale and reposition the nest, then I'm back to the same problem of the outside boundaries not being constrained on top of the video, but rather growing is size as it does the scaling.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 28, 2020

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Scale nest as desired in containing timeline and then double click on nest
and then animate inside the nest in its own timeline tab.

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Community Beginner ,
Aug 28, 2020

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After scaling and positioning in the video timeline, then going to the nest to put in another set of scaling and positioning, nothing changed on the video timeline. It was not applied. Is there a rendering step missing?

 

Conrad's video of the baloons seems to be proof that Premier supports the effect I want, but unfortunately I still cannot reproduce that effect without exporting and importing. I'd prefer not to lose any quality.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 27, 2020

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I would never have thought about using crop on an adjustment layer for this, works well.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 27, 2020

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OK, based on everything you’ve said so far, here are a few key things about Premiere Pro that should help you get there simply and quickly.

 

Nesting an image (or video) in its own sequence is instant, because if you simply drag a media item in the Project panel to the New icon, a new sequence will be created that contains that media and exactly matches the media pixel dimensions. Now that media is in a frame of the same exact size, with no math needed.

 

Make-sequence-from-still.gif

 

The slow part is that you would have to do this for each media item you want to animate in a frame, because each of them needs to be in its own sequence. Do not drag more than one at a time, because that would build a single sequence with multiple items (great for a slide show, but not for what you want to do here).

 

nested-sequences-Project-panel.jpg

 

Once you have a sequence for each media item, you drag these (not the original media items) into the master sequence, which makes them nested sequences. This is what you have to do so that each media item can be animated inside its own frame limits.

 

How do you animate each? Double-click one of the media item sequences to open it, in its Timeline select the original media item, and look in the Effect Controls panel. Enable keyframes for the properties you want to animate, and then you have two time-saving choices to do your pan/zoom:

  • Click to select the Motion heading so that a bounding box appears around the media items in the Program panel. Now you can position and scale using that bounding box and its handles.
  • In the Effect controls panel, scrub the values next to the properties you are animating.

 

Motion-direct-manipulation.jpg

 

Remember, you are not doing the animations in the master sequence; only in each individual nested media item sequence. When you’re done, your animations in each of the nested media item sequences will be visible in the master sequence. You can do the nested sequence pan/zooms either before or after you add those to the master sequence.

 

There’s one more thing I noticed: If you have multiple media items that need exactly the same pan/zoom, you can select one of them in the master sequence imeline, choose Edit > Copy, select the others, choose Edit > Paste Attributes and select Motion. That will copy the animation to the items you selected, though they will now have the same position so you’ll probably have to pull them apart in the Program panel and drag them to their final positions. But it means you only have to set up the pan/zoom once.

 

This is going to be both more flexible and higher quality than rendering out video and importing it back in for each item. Using nested sequences, you can keep making adjustments to each item at any time and they will continuously update the master sequence (no waiting for rendering, no extra export/import steps), and there will be no generational quality loss from rendering out and importing each item.

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Community Beginner ,
Aug 27, 2020

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Conrad, thank you for these details. I'll try now to follow them and get back.

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Community Beginner ,
Aug 28, 2020

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Thank you, Conrad.

 

Did you that Conrad, Kordt/Cordt and Kurt/Curt are all derived from the same original form which is "Kühne Rat" in today's German spelling. In old spelling forms "Kun Rad" or "KonRad" or "ConRad." "Kühne Rat" means "bold counsel/advice" in English. Thank you for your good advice!

 

I think I understand what you are saying, but am running into a hang-up on the step: "Once you have a sequence for each media item, you drag these (not the original media items) into the master sequence, which makes them nested sequences. This is what you have to do so that each media item can be animated inside its own frame limits."

 

I get a new tab for each sequence I create. but when I try to drag one of the nested sequences into the master sequence using the "Overlay" option (or anywhere else at all), I get a popup error message saying "No content in sequence In/Out range"

 

I haven't found a work-around to overcome this problem. Do you have any more bold advice 🙂

 

Kurt

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Community Beginner ,
Aug 28, 2020

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Addendum:

If I convert the sequence of the still photo to a nest, then I can bring it into the main video sequence.. The problem is that it covers the whole video. If I rescale and reposition the nest, then I'm back to the same problem of the outside boundaries not being constrained on top of the video, but rather growing is size as it does the scaling.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 28, 2020

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KMatthia wrote:

“I get a new tab for each sequence I create. but when I try to drag one of the nested sequences into the master sequence using the "Overlay" option (or anywhere else at all), I get a popup error message saying "No content in sequence In/Out range"”

 

I do not know what is going on there. The way I did mine was to drag a still image sequence from the Project panel and drop it into the Timeline of the master sequence. I also tried it by dropping into the Overlay drop zone in the Program panel which is what I think you did, and didn’t get an error.

 

I typed the error message into Google and it brought up another thread on this forum that suggests there may be a problem with track targeting. Read the last two posts in that thread (No Content Sequence In/Out Range) and review whether the targeted tracks in your Timeline panel are correct. Or maybe someone else reading this thread has a better interpretion of that error.

 

KMatthia wrote:

“If I convert the sequence of the still photo to a nest, then I can bring it into the main video sequence.. The problem is that it covers the whole video. If I rescale and reposition the nest, then I'm back to the same problem of the outside boundaries not being constrained on top of the video, but rather growing is size as it does the scaling.”

 

That sounds to me like you are editing in the master sequence, changing Position and Scale of the nested sequence. It should work correctly if, as I mentioned above, you apply the Position and Scale pan/zoom animations to the media inside each nested sequence. If you want to do a pan/zoom limited to image dimensions, be sure you double-click that nested animation to get inside it first, and then do the pan/zoom to the media inside that sequence.

 

KMatthia wrote:

“ "Kühne Rat" means "bold counsel/advice" in English. Thank you for your good advice! ”

 

You’re welcome. Yes, I once looked up the meaning of my name and found that, which makes it interesting that I ended up in the business of training/education. I have not yet asked my parents what they thought I might be doing in the future when they gave me that name.

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