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Advice: Image rejections

New Here ,
Jan 16, 2023 Jan 16, 2023

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Hello, I'm new to Adobe Stock as a contributor. I've submitted a couple hundred photos over the past few months and none of them have been selected. I can understand if it's a formatting or quality issue, but the consistency in what photos are selected leaves me scratching my head. I submitted this image of Thun, Switzerland that was rejected. I thought maybe it isn't large enough, but other similar photos at larger sizes I submitted were rejected.Thun1.jpg

 

Then I see photos on Adobe Stock that look like this:

Screenshot 2023-01-16 at 11.36.55 AM.png

 

So I'm wondering what specific criteria I'm missing? Are the photos I'm submitting too saturated? Are they too small? Thanks in advance.

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Community Expert ,
Jan 16, 2023 Jan 16, 2023

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quote

I suspect I have a few photos in my portfolio that wouldn't be accepted in by today's standards. 


By @George_F

I have pictures that I would not submit anymore. Especially when reading some comments here. But I check my pictures more extensively: every bycicle carries multiple logos. If there are too much, don't submit, editing takes too much time. Or submit as editorial... 😉 Do not photograph flowers for stock, but if you have nice flowers, submit, even if they don't sell. And sometimes, pictures that never sold, sell at some point. Others, where I thought that none would ever buy, sell a week after submission. 

 

So my rules are: 

  • do not shoot for stock, but if you shoot, shoot also for stock! So when I'm on site, I shoot whatever I'm asked to shoot, and I shoot whatever I see and for which I do not need a model or property release. 
  • don't think your assets don't sell. If you have them in your database, and they are technically good enough, and you have time for keywording, submit.
  • and if you find your dog cute, submit, just for fun. Somone may just need that dog for whatever they do. 
ABAMBO | Hard- and Software Engineer | Photographer

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Community Expert ,
Jan 17, 2023 Jan 17, 2023

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Hello,

You've got a lot of replies already, but to reiterate...

Firstly, what type of camera did you use, a smartphone (Apple iPhone, Samsung?...)? I ask because the pixels become a little more 'blocky' when enlarged to 100%. This is due to JPEG compression. JPEG uses lossy compression - pixels that are not needed are removed; it is used to save space. The unfortunate consequence of this method is that there is a reduction in quality, esp noticeable if one does large enlargements - as the case could be with stock!

Your photo seems to come under this. The specific criteria, in this case, (I think) is that the pixels appear blocky.

The other picture you referred to, I can't really say, as it is a screenshot? but probably doesn't suffer from compression artifacts. (Composition is bad, however!)

The white balance issue that was pointed out, I don't think is an issue in this case! It's a sunny day -the camera's software probably increased the blues and greens 

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