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Are these pictures to noisy?

Community Beginner ,
Aug 24, 2021 Aug 24, 2021

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I took some pictures of a dung beetle.

I'm wondering if these pictures are to noisy for adobe stock.

settings were iso 200 1/125th f/8

The noise is mainly visible in the out of focus areas.

I'm a bit afraid to use the noise reduction since that really affects the details.

 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 24, 2021 Aug 24, 2021

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I think the noise is okay but the depth of field is for macro to shallow.

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Community Beginner ,
Aug 24, 2021 Aug 24, 2021

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this is f/8 already i cant really get it less shallow. after f/11 diffraction sets in which makes the eyes look very soft.  f/11 gets me like less than a millimeter of extra depth of field. The only way i can get better depth of field is by focus stacking and using a dead subject.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 24, 2021 Aug 24, 2021

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There may be troubles with chromatic aberration. And yes, the noise level is visible. You need carefully to address that. It's possible to reduce the noise level without affecting too much the overall picture's sharpness. You could also work a bit the exposure.

 

All in all, I think your pictures are great. If they pass, however, cannot be said. It's trial and error...

ABAMBO | Hard- and Software Engineer | Photographer

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Community Beginner ,
Aug 25, 2021 Aug 25, 2021

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Hi could you give me a direction where i can find the abberation?
im going over the pics with 200% zoom and i cant find any.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 24, 2021 Aug 24, 2021

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Hi @snellejelle99 ,

Lighting determines your camera settings for adequate exposure. You need to check to make sure your camera settings produce enough exposure. That you'll see in the view finder of the camera. 

 

Your shutter speed should be as such to freeze moving parts. No blur should be in the forefront. There is no way 1/120 shutter speed can freeze the moving parts of a bug. You need much more shutter speed than that. Therefore you need to increase ISO, and since in my opinion your depth of field is too shallow, you also need to use smaller f-stop (that is larger f-stop number). Too much of the images are out of focus. I cannot identify a specific part of the front of the first bug that you are focusing on. Therefore I take it that the subject includes all that is in front of which a part is out of focus.

 

Adjust your camera settings to get required speed, adequate exposure and depth of field. In the case of moving subjects (whole or part), you need enough shutter speed to freeze movement. When you're done with shooting your subject, use an editor to make corrections. Photoshop is a good one. 

 

As I've said before too much of your subjects are out of focus. There are also color fringing and noise/grain problem. 

 

At https://incomepayout.blogspot.com/p/income-requirements-and-payout.html#focus are tips about focus, lighting and exposure.

 

Best wishes

JG

Photographer and Nutrition Author

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Community Beginner ,
Aug 25, 2021 Aug 25, 2021

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Hi could you give me a direction where i can find the fringing?
im going over the pics with 200% zoom and i cant find any.

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