Bad, bad photograph! – How to improve?

Explorer ,
Aug 29, 2021 Aug 29, 2021

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Hello

Firstly, I have no illusions about this photograph, It’s abysmal and I wouldn’t dream of submitting it.

However, I was hoping someone might offer some guidance on what I could have done differently to achieve a  better result.

I’m a beginner trying to teach myself photography with quite mixed results so I would be very grateful for any tips that might help me improve.

 

It was taken on a Panasonic GH4 using the 12-60 kit lens. I had it set to aperture priority and zoomed in all the way. The aperture was 5.6 ( the widest available to me). The shutter speed was 1/100, and  ISO 200.

It was taken hand-held,  early this morning  under a fairly bright but overcast sky.

I’ve not done any post processing so as not to confuse the issue.

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correct answers 3 Correct answers

Adobe Community Professional , Aug 29, 2021 Aug 29, 2021
Hi, the first thing that needs to be done is to increase the exposure to 1/1000 to remove the wing and head movement. The aperture is also a problem because the subjects are too far apart.

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Adobe Community Professional , Aug 29, 2021 Aug 29, 2021
Ralph is correct in that you need a much faster shutter speed to capture moving objects. 1/100 is only good for completely stationary objects, and depending on how steady your hand is, might require use of a tripod. Also, if you were already at ISO 200, increasing the shutter speed 10x probably would have resulted in an objectionable amount of noise. Photographing birds is perhaps a bit too challenging for a beginner. Start with things that don't move ! 

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Adobe Community Professional , Aug 29, 2021 Aug 29, 2021
Study the exposure triangle (shutter speed, f stop and ISO) and understand thoroughly how each setting interacts with the other on your camera. 

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Explorer ,
Aug 29, 2021 Aug 29, 2021

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Just to add, I had the camera set to auto focus.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 29, 2021 Aug 29, 2021

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Hi, the first thing that needs to be done is to increase the exposure to 1/1000 to remove the wing and head movement. The aperture is also a problem because the subjects are too far apart.

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Explorer ,
Aug 29, 2021 Aug 29, 2021

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Ah, thanks so much for that, really good to know. I’ll give it another bash tomorrow.

All the best - Susie

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 29, 2021 Aug 29, 2021

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Ralph is correct in that you need a much faster shutter speed to capture moving objects. 1/100 is only good for completely stationary objects, and depending on how steady your hand is, might require use of a tripod. Also, if you were already at ISO 200, increasing the shutter speed 10x probably would have resulted in an objectionable amount of noise. Photographing birds is perhaps a bit too challenging for a beginner. Start with things that don't move ! 

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Explorer ,
Aug 29, 2021 Aug 29, 2021

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Thank you, that’s very useful advice. I shall have my tripod all set up and ready tomorrow morning.

 

Wow, there are so many settings to get your head around. I think you’re right about birds being a bit of a challenge. I might have a go at slugs!

 

All the best - Susie

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 29, 2021 Aug 29, 2021

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Study the exposure triangle (shutter speed, f stop and ISO) and understand thoroughly how each setting interacts with the other on your camera. 

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