Images rejected for technical reasons

Community Beginner ,
Nov 04, 2020 Nov 04, 2020

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Hello everyone,

 

these pictures have been rejected due technical reasons. I checked them for the specifics every image should have (resolution, color space, sharpess) but I can't find any problem in that. So I'm hoping someone from the community could help me. I'm open to any advice.

 

Thank you very much!

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correct answers 2 Correct answers

Adobe Community Professional , Nov 05, 2020 Nov 05, 2020
I'm sorry to say that, but I think the curators are right. If you zoom in, you will see that there is a lot of noise in the images. The snow and the sky consist entirely of surfaces of noise. There is also chromatic aberration around the trees.

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Adobe Community Professional , Nov 05, 2020 Nov 05, 2020
Technical issues is not a catch phrase for what they are not looking for. They are for problems with the picture. You should examine rejected pictures at 100% and look into details like noise, artefacts, chromatic aberration, etc. I've looked into the first image and I find as Marianne pointed out noise and chromatic aberration. I would also guess that there is also an exposure problem. I didn't look into the histogram so I can't be sure about that. Pictures that Adobe thinks are not commercia...

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New Here ,
Nov 04, 2020 Nov 04, 2020

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Those are beautiful photos!! I'm guessing the "technical issues" is their 'catch-all' phrase (because that's the one I mostly get as well. So then it falls to your pictures, while beautiful in their own right, isn't quite what they're looking for. If you haven't already, check out their Visual Trends Guide. Also look at upping your photography game: follow Peter McKinnon on YouTube and/or check out the photography classes on Skill Share.

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Community Beginner ,
Nov 04, 2020 Nov 04, 2020

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Thank you very much for your reply. That helps me a lot!

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 05, 2020 Nov 05, 2020

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Technical issues is not a catch phrase for what they are not looking for. They are for problems with the picture. You should examine rejected pictures at 100% and look into details like noise, artefacts, chromatic aberration, etc. I've looked into the first image and I find as Marianne pointed out noise and chromatic aberration. I would also guess that there is also an exposure problem. I didn't look into the histogram so I can't be sure about that.

 

Pictures that Adobe thinks are not commercially interesting have a refusal reason of their own. The picture I looked into would certainly be one that fits into the portfolio.

 

If you are new to stock, you should consider these resources: https://helpx.adobe.com/stock/contributor/tutorials.html
Please read the contributor user manual for more information on Adobe stock contributions: https://helpx.adobe.com/stock/contributor/user-guide.html
See here for rejection reasons: https://helpx.adobe.com/stock/contributor/help/reasons-for-content-rejection.html
and especially quality and technical issues: https://helpx.adobe.com/stock/contributor/help/quality-and-technical-issues.html

 

ABAMBO | Hard- and Software Engineer | Photographer

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Community Beginner ,
Nov 05, 2020 Nov 05, 2020

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Thank you Abambo! You answer makes it very understandable for me. Thanks also for the noted resources, I will have a look into them.

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Community Beginner ,
Dec 25, 2020 Dec 25, 2020

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I'm sorry, Abambo, but the rejection reason of  "Technical Issues" just by the very nature of the wording used is a "catch all" response. It is ambigious in the wording without any details. So I must strongly disagree with you. Additionally, I have had several images rejected for "Technical Issues" by Adobestock that were accepted at other agencies and sold. The rejection reason of  "Technical Issues" does not tell the contributor where to look for the problem or problems or the nature of the problem or anything. Ambigious critiques in the artistic community are useless and frustrating.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Dec 25, 2020 Dec 25, 2020

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Additionally, I have had several images rejected for "Technical Issues" by Adobestock that were accepted at other agencies and sold.

Adobe is especially picky on issues on the pictures. On Adobe stock we need to play by Adobe's rules.

I'm sorry, Abambo, but the rejection reason of "Technical Issues" just by the very nature of the wording used is a "catch all" response.

Either you did not read the thread or you did not understand what I was saying. A prior poster suspected that quote "(...) the "technical issues" is their 'catch-all' phrase (...) while beautiful in their own right, isn't quite what they're looking for." unquote. It is not. Technical issues means technical issues. If you post something they don't want in their database, the refusal it on different grounds: quote "

Aesthetic or commercial appeal

Ask yourself: “If I were the customer, why would I buy this image?"

If you can’t answer that question, we recommend that you change your approach if you want to submit content to Adobe Stock. Pay attention to the details: If you have a photo of a great-looking family enjoying a barbecue but the barbecue is covered in rust, the image's commercial value is greatly reduced. " unquote

 

As said in a different thread, the reason for moderation is not to make you a better contributor but to make the stock database a better and more useful product for potential buyers.

 

Technical issues is a "catch-all" phrase for technical issues in the pictures. And it does not specifically point to a distinct issue. It's your task to analyze the refused picture for eventually corrective actions. More on this can be found here: https://community.adobe.com/t5/stock-contributors/7-images-rejected-for-quot-technical-issues-quot/m...

 

Refusals can have one or more reasons, but the moderator refuses on the first reason he or she sees. And yes, moderation is done by humans, so there may be some variation. What gets accepted by one moderator may well get refused by an other.

 

ABAMBO | Hard- and Software Engineer | Photographer

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 05, 2020 Nov 05, 2020

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I'm sorry to say that, but I think the curators are right. If you zoom in, you will see that there is a lot of noise in the images. The snow and the sky consist entirely of surfaces of noise. There is also chromatic aberration around the trees.

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