Photo rejected for technical problems

New Here ,
Nov 25, 2021 Nov 25, 2021

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Please, could someone help me identify the technical problems that caused my photos to be rejected? I'm a novice photographer and I'd like to improve myself. Thank you so much.

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Contributor critique, Troubleshooting

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Enthusiast ,
Nov 25, 2021 Nov 25, 2021

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Hi Luana,

Bibi is not sharp and the whole picture is too warm (yellow).

The plant isn't sharp either and that image is underexposed.

It looks like motion blur in both cases, meaning that the shutter speed was too slow to freeze the moment.

Hope that helps,

Michael

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Michael Niessen - Photographer, photo-editor, educator

Photo-editing (Ps/Lr/LrC) and photography workshops & one-on-one training (off- and online)

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New Here ,
Nov 26, 2021 Nov 26, 2021

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Hi Michael,

Thank you so much for the precious information. I'll try to improve the edits the next few times. And as for the shutter, I don't think I can control the speed of it, my camera is not a dslr. The way is to try not to move hands on the hota to capture the moment. Again, thank you.

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Enthusiast ,
Nov 27, 2021 Nov 27, 2021

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You're welcome, Luana!

Just check your camera's doc, just to make sure. Some non-DSLR allow you to change the shutter speed or other settings that directly affect it, such as ISO.

A little trick that can be used to reduce shake is to add a 2 or 5 second delay. Pressing the shutter button in itself introduces some amount of shake. With a delay, you press the shutter button, then have those few seconds to just stop moving until the picture has been taken. In the same line of ideas, shooting a burst of a pictures might help, as there should be more shake in the first and last one (when you press/release the button) than in the pictures in-between. Those simple techniques will obviously not give you a lot of leeway regarding shutter speed, but sometimes every little thing helps.

And, of course, make sure Bibi doesn't move either 😉

Michael

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Michael Niessen - Photographer, photo-editor, educator

Photo-editing (Ps/Lr/LrC) and photography workshops & one-on-one training (off- and online)

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Nov 26, 2021 Nov 26, 2021

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About framing your shots:  Don't hold your camera too close to your subject.  Bibi's ears are clipped.  Same goes for the plant leaves.

 

 

 

Nancy O'Shea, Adobe Product User & Community Professional
Alt-Web Design & Publishing ~ Web : Print : Graphics : Media

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