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Please help me understand the rejection for technical reasons better (new criteria?)

New Here ,
Sep 29, 2021 Sep 29, 2021

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After a little break I started to come back to upload more photos. Interestingly I see a much higher rejection rate for 'technical reasons' than before. All images I upload have been succesfully submitted to shutterstock which, at least in the past, were much stricter. Usually getting it accepted by shuttersstock was almost guaranteed acceptance at Adobe stock. No some get accepted and some not almost randomly (even from the same series with same post-processing...)

 

I looked online, but has the reviews become stricter or new criteria?

 

Could someone please help me understand what is wrong with attached examples? Any input is helpful. I just don't understand how I need to process them differently.

All photos shot with Fuji X-T3 and process in either C1 or LR...

 

I appreciate any input as the rejection don't really state anything. Thank you.

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Contributor critique, Contributors, Troubleshooting

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correct answers 2 Correct answers

Adobe Community Professional , Sep 29, 2021 Sep 29, 2021
Focus is the issue with all 3 of these. On the first image, no part of the bolt is actually in focus. The rope image is underexposed, a small part of one loop of rope might be in focus, and there's a halo on the upper edge of the rope loop which could indicate excessive sharpening or processing. Both of those, the bolt and the rope, have a too narrow DOF. The water lily image is underexposed, and the large blurry foreground with messy leaves isn't very appealing. You might be able to rescue this...

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Adobe Community Professional , Sep 29, 2021 Sep 29, 2021
Camera equipment and post editing tools are better today than yesterday.  And Adobe Stock is attracting more professionals than before.  So to answer your question, yes.  The quality & technical standards are getting higher, not lower.  Examine images at 100-300% magnification.  Fix imperfections when possible in Photoshop or Lightroom.  Hopefully your subject is something of commercial value to Stock customers.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 29, 2021 Sep 29, 2021

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Focus is the issue with all 3 of these. On the first image, no part of the bolt is actually in focus. The rope image is underexposed, a small part of one loop of rope might be in focus, and there's a halo on the upper edge of the rope loop which could indicate excessive sharpening or processing. Both of those, the bolt and the rope, have a too narrow DOF. The water lily image is underexposed, and the large blurry foreground with messy leaves isn't very appealing. You might be able to rescue this image by doing landscape crop of the best focused section in the middle. 

 

I haven't noticed that Adobe Moderators have become more strict; however I have noticed that I'm much better at inspecting my images in advance to cull out any that simply aren't good enough or need more editing, so my rejection rate is now quite low.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 29, 2021 Sep 29, 2021

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Camera equipment and post editing tools are better today than yesterday.  And Adobe Stock is attracting more professionals than before.  So to answer your question, yes.  The quality & technical standards are getting higher, not lower. 

 

Examine images at 100-300% magnification.  Fix imperfections when possible in Photoshop or Lightroom.  Hopefully your subject is something of commercial value to Stock customers.

 

Nancy O'Shea, Adobe Product User & Community Professional
Alt-Web Design & Publishing ~ Web : Print : Graphics : Media

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 29, 2021 Sep 29, 2021

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Hi @Martin5DAA ,

The camera's aperture setting is too wide, producing very shallow depth of field, hence most of you frames are out of focus. Additionally the lilies are out of focus and seem to have a vibrancy issue.

Best wishes

JG

Photographer and Nutrition Author

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New Here ,
Sep 30, 2021 Sep 30, 2021

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Thank you everyone for the helpful replies.

I kept the DOF low on all of them intentionally but I guess it's not what Adobe is looking for. I also was told on other stock sites to crop as little and leave the final customer to do the crop to their likeing. But maybe with Adobe I will crop more if they prefere that.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 30, 2021 Sep 30, 2021

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quote

I kept the DOF low on all of them intentionally but I guess it's not what Adobe is looking for.


By @Martin5DAA

DOF is a great tool, but the main subject still needs to be in-focus:

Abambo_0-1633026845597.png

In addition, you need to correct the chromatic aberration.

The ropes are underexposed and could effectively get less DOF. As I said, the main subject should be in focus.

The plants-picture is out of focus. I can't really see a natural focus point. In addition, it is underexposed, as you can see on the histogram.

Abambo_1-1633027222063.png

 

You shouldn't crop too much, but nevertheless, you should get a pleasant framing. That helps with the customer, when he or she is choosing a picture.

 

ABAMBO | Hard- and Software Engineer | Photographer

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