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Please look and see and decide if this is a bad quality image in a technical issue!.

New Here ,
Sep 23, 2020 Sep 23, 2020

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Is there really anything wrong with this image!.

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Troubleshooting

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correct answers 3 Correct answers

Adobe Community Professional , Sep 23, 2020 Sep 23, 2020
Well, mainly there are no contrasts in the picture and I can't see any details. You should also use the sRGB ICC profile.

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Adobe Community Professional , Sep 23, 2020 Sep 23, 2020
I might be wrong but I don't think there's a whole lot of demand for B&W photos on Adobe Stock.  Most graphics people know how to convert color to B&W for special use cases.  So that's not something I would be personally interested in purchasing. The composition is murky. I assume this is some sort of rocky beach or coastline but what the actual subject is, I am not really sure because the image is too dark.  As you can see from this Photoshop graph, the Input Levels need adjustment to bring t...

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Adobe Community Professional , Sep 24, 2020 Sep 24, 2020
Hello, It is best to leave in colour - that is according to Adobe Stock - the buyer can easliy convert to B&W but not the other way round! From a B&W perspective, your image is underexposed, it lacks contrast, so the result is'muddy'. There are no whites or blacks, just a muddy grey. Looking at the histogram of your image it shows this: This means it is underexposed. So, an alternative method instead of levels is to increase exposure in the exposure slider, increase contrast, and decrease the h...

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LEGEND ,
Sep 23, 2020 Sep 23, 2020

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It looks as if it the image has been turned to black and white. If that is really the colours of the world at that point, this is unlucky for you.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 23, 2020 Sep 23, 2020

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Well, mainly there are no contrasts in the picture and I can't see any details. You should also use the sRGB ICC profile.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 23, 2020 Sep 23, 2020

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I might be wrong but I don't think there's a whole lot of demand for B&W photos on Adobe Stock.  Most graphics people know how to convert color to B&W for special use cases.  So that's not something I would be personally interested in purchasing.

 

The composition is murky. I assume this is some sort of rocky beach or coastline but what the actual subject is, I am not really sure because the image is too dark.  As you can see from this Photoshop graph, the Input Levels need adjustment to bring them into better balance.

image.png

 

After a Levels adjustment, the image becomes noticeably clearer and more detailed.

image.png

 

Hope that helps,

 

Nancy O'Shea, Adobe Product User & Community Professional
Alt-Web Design & Publishing ~ Web : Print : Graphics : Media

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 24, 2020 Sep 24, 2020

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Hello,

It is best to leave in colour - that is according to Adobe Stock - the buyer can easliy convert to B&W but not the other way round!

From a B&W perspective, your image is underexposed, it lacks contrast, so the result is'muddy'. There are no whites or blacks, just a muddy grey.

Looking at the histogram of your image it shows this:

Screenshot 2020-09-24 094605histogram.jpg

This means it is underexposed.

So, an alternative method instead of levels is to increase exposure in the exposure slider, increase contrast, and decrease the highlights a bit - something like this:

Screenshot 2020-09-24 094936_exposure.jpg

Of course, this is much easier done if you took this in raw, rather than the camera saving to JPEG.

If you don't know about raw, then I would read a lot about it.

 

So, yes, there are a number of issues with this image.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Sep 24, 2020 Sep 24, 2020

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In addition to the very good analysis that you got here, I recommend some reading:

If you are new to stock, you should consider these resources: https://helpx.adobe.com/stock/contributor/tutorials.html
Please read the contributor user manual for more information on Adobe stock contributions: https://helpx.adobe.com/stock/contributor/user-guide.html
See here for rejection reasons: https://helpx.adobe.com/stock/contributor/help/reasons-for-content-rejection.html
and especially quality and technical issues: https://helpx.adobe.com/stock/contributor/help/quality-and-technical-issues.html

ABAMBO | Hard- and Software Engineer | Photographer

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