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Puzzling over various rejections

Community Beginner ,
Dec 27, 2018 Dec 27, 2018

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I'm a very experienced pro photographer (40 years) but am new to submitting my images to Adobe Stock, let alone anywhere else. So, I am in learning mode.

I've submitted a couple hundred carefully selected (I thought) images of many types. Approximately one-third have been accepted so far exactly 83, in fact.

Here's my question: Does anyone get the feeling that images are edited by computer, not actual people? I ask because a good number of my submissions are rejected for reasons that simply do not match up with the reality of the image. I find myself laughing at many of the rejections, in fact, because they seem to be so wrong.

I totally get the "artifacts" reason, for example, and accept that as a somewhat picky yet viable  reaction most times. On the other hand,  "out of focus" seems to be inexplicable to me.  Does an entire image need to be in focus?  That seems to be the case with a number of my shots, even when selective focus makes the shot more effective.  I'll attach an example, a rejection for "out of focus". Yes, there certainly soft areas that surround the sharply focused bee, but that's what makes it an appealing shot, IMHO. I would appreciate any reactions, and I again admit I'm in learning mode here.aP-bee on flower DwnSz 0461.jpg

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Advisor ,
Dec 27, 2018 Dec 27, 2018

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Hello Eagle One Eye, You are not the first nor the last to asked these questions. So much depends upon what you and I are used to and Exactly what Adobe Stock wishes to have in their stock offerings. The review of work is done by humans and at a rapid pace and numbers thousands of contributed photographs daily.

Yes, you are right, you are on a learning curve not about how to be a fine professional photographer but how to photograph, finish and present your work for acceptance to Adobe Stock. Thank goodness Adobe has many guidelines on quality, composition, exposure and subjects that are desired. Yes, the sweet photo you presented here has the central flower is out of focus - which is often a reason the work is not acceptable.

Study these things and get to know how different this work is from any other experience.

Here are a few links for your information and help. Best regards, We all continue to learn. JH

Where to find Free Adobe Tutorials

https://helpx.adobe.com/photoshop/tutorials.html

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Community Beginner ,
Dec 28, 2018 Dec 28, 2018

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Ah, the voice of reason is always comforting, thank you Joan, for your

calming response. I need that!

I want to offer up one more example of the focus rejection, though. It's

been rejected for "out of focus", yet the only soft parts are background,

which (to my eyes) need to be that way to make this an effective shot. It

was deliberately taken with a longer lens to do this. No obligation to

respond, just need to express my frustration.

On Thu, Dec 27, 2018 at 9:03 PM joanh22203655 <forums_noreply@adobe.com>

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Advisor ,
Dec 28, 2018 Dec 28, 2018

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Hi, Glad I could reassure you. I will reply to the Bbee on the flower though. I do see the very most lower curving center of the flower as out of focus - Adobe would need the one forward flower to be sharply in focus with proper exposure as you present it. Why not try looking at a few at high magnification of 100 - 200% and see what you can discover. If you find one to try to send in for review, let us know how it goes. No doubt a few of my photographer friends will have a few helpful words here for you - they have been where you are and enjoy the helping of a fellow camera guy, I, however, am an illustrator so see things quite differently. Wishing a gentle learning curve. Regards, JH

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Dec 29, 2018 Dec 29, 2018

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I too had once expressed the suspicion that image moderation would be done by computer, especially, because of Adobe Sensei. Well, Matt Haywards of Adobe assured that it was all done by humans. The disadvantage of this is that acceptance is dependant on the mood of the moderator if the image is touching the limits and a critical moderator would refuse and a more indulgent would pass.

I have pictures that got refused by a reason and pictures taken within the same conditions pass (studio pictures, so the conditions where the same).

Never mind.

As for your bee on the flower picture, I think to see, that the bee is not 100% in focus. At least the leg is not crisp sharp. There is only a very small stripe in focus and that is not enough in the eyes of the moderator.

Adobe moderators are especially picky.

ABAMBO | Hard- and Software Engineer | Photographer

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 06, 2019 Jan 06, 2019

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Hello,

It you look closer (and get more use to what Adobe tend to look for in such shots), the bee is not completely sharp:

aP-bee+on+flower+DwnSz+0461focus.jpg

There are some out of focus areas, so that's why they rejected it.

(I've had similar rejections as well on htis theme. You have to be careful using shallow focus. The subject - the bee - needs to be sharp. The wings are sharp, but not the bee's body and legs. I don't think it is worth resubmitting, because they will probably reject it again, although each moderator is different to a certain degree, (or so it appears).

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Community Beginner ,
Jan 06, 2019 Jan 06, 2019

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Thanks for your input, which is absolutely correct. Adobe Stock's criteria

are strong and narrow, I am learning, which is actually a good thing.

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Engaged ,
Jan 06, 2019 Jan 06, 2019

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A816CD90-DF82-4278-AF9B-170A9A7273DA.jpeg

Another problem with this image is that the insect shoud be the focus of the photograph - and maybe the flower a little more blurred. A little more cropping and composition. IMO.

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