Rejected due to technical issues

New Here ,
Jan 17, 2022 Jan 17, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Hey, I'm new to photography and just had two photos rejected for technical issues.

 

Hoping someone with an experienced eye would be able to point out what I seem to be missing, please!

 

 

The photos themselves were decreased in resolution to fit the MB limit on photo uploads, as an FYI.

TOPICS
Troubleshooting

Views

96

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines

correct answers 3 Correct answers

Adobe Community Professional , Jan 17, 2022 Jan 17, 2022
Image #1: Uneven exposure.  The foreground is too dark.  For best results, don't point your camera at the sun.  Try to shoot photos with sun directly above you or behind your shoulder.  Image #2:  Underexposed and B&W.   Stock customers want full color photos for use in commercial projects. Read these links for more tips: https://helpx.adobe.com/stock/contributor/help/reasons-for-content-rejection.htmlhttps://helpx.adobe.com/stock/contributor/help/quality-and-technical-issues.htmlhttps://helpx.adobe.com/stock/contributor/user-guide.html/stock/contributor/help/photography-illustrations.ug.htmlhttps://helpx.adobe.com/stock/how-to/tips-stock-image-acceptance.html...

Likes

Translate

Translate
Adobe Community Professional , Jan 17, 2022 Jan 17, 2022
1) poor focus, underexposed shadows, overexposed / blown out highlights; the branches and powerlines that intrude into the frame are distracting. You should either have recomposed or edited those out. 2) same issues here - underexposed shadows, overexposed highlights and poor focus

Likes

Translate

Translate
Adobe Community Professional , Jan 17, 2022 Jan 17, 2022
Yes, the foreground needs to be lightened in both.  And for landscape photography you would benefit from a larger depth of field.  For example with the horse, you could have gone up to f11 rather than f5 and had the fence and the horse in focus.  It's very challenging shooting into the sun, because often you or your camera adjust your settings based on that bright light in the sky and then everything else is dark and noisy. I lightened the shadows and you can see how much noise / grain there is ...

Likes

Translate

Translate
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 17, 2022 Jan 17, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Image #1: Uneven exposure.  The foreground is too dark.  For best results, don't point your camera at the sun.  Try to shoot photos with sun directly above you or behind your shoulder. 

 

Image #2:  Underexposed and B&W.   Stock customers want full color photos for use in commercial projects.

 

Read these links for more tips:

 

Nancy O'Shea, Adobe Product User & Community Professional
Alt-Web Design & Publishing ~ Web : Print : Graphics : Media

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
New Here ,
Jan 17, 2022 Jan 17, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Hey.

 

In situations where photos are being taken (unavoidably) with the sun directly infront, what would you recommend in this case? But thanks for the headups in general!

 

That's actually a full colour photo, it was how the picture came out. I put them both into Lightroom to 'auto' tune them but generally they are both as taken! So because of the colour of the photo (or the actual, real life content within the photo) it would be considered unusable, commercially? 

 

 

Thank you for the links, I'll be sure to look through them!

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 17, 2022 Jan 17, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied


@Tim Short wrote:

Hey.

 

In situations where photos are being taken (unavoidably) with the sun directly infront, what would you recommend in this case?

 


Using a graduated nd filter. (hardware, not software!)

ABAMBO | Hard- and Software Engineer | Photographer

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 17, 2022 Jan 17, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

1) poor focus, underexposed shadows, overexposed / blown out highlights; the branches and powerlines that intrude into the frame are distracting. You should either have recomposed or edited those out.

2) same issues here - underexposed shadows, overexposed highlights and poor focus

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
New Here ,
Jan 17, 2022 Jan 17, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Hey Jill. Thanks for the response! 

 

By underexposed shadows you mean the extremely dark branches etc in the foreground?

Overexposed highlights I dont see, could you choose a key area for me to take a quick look at on the photo so I understand what you mean in this case?

 

I am also slightly confused about the focus, is it because not all of the photo is focused or is it because the focus is on a particular area that is sub-optimal?

 

Thanks again for your help! 🙂

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 17, 2022 Jan 17, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

In a nutshell, proper exposure is when you don't lose details. Check your images with the Histogram Panel.

https://helpx.adobe.com/photoshop/using/viewing-histograms-pixel-values.html

 

Also read up on Depth-of-Field as it pertains to focus.

https://photographylife.com/what-is-depth-of-field

 

 

 

Nancy O'Shea, Adobe Product User & Community Professional
Alt-Web Design & Publishing ~ Web : Print : Graphics : Media

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 17, 2022 Jan 17, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Yes, the foreground needs to be lightened in both.  And for landscape photography you would benefit from a larger depth of field.  For example with the horse, you could have gone up to f11 rather than f5 and had the fence and the horse in focus.  It's very challenging shooting into the sun, because often you or your camera adjust your settings based on that bright light in the sky and then everything else is dark and noisy. I lightened the shadows and you can see how much noise / grain there is when you zoom in on the horse (which I assume is the primary focus of this photo.)  I also did a quick edit to get rid of the branches and powerline.  I will point out that as it is, the photo would still be rejected for technical reasons.  You can lighten the shadows and reduce noise, but rarely can you fix the focus.

 

SNY00582a.jpg

 

SNY00611a.jpg

 

And like @Jill_C said, same exposure issues and focus issues in this photo.

 

I hope this helps you.

 

-Rob

 


Rob R, Photographer

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 17, 2022 Jan 17, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied


@reedesign1912 wrote:

 It's very challenging shooting into the sun, because often you or your camera adjust your settings based on that bright light in the sky and then everything else is dark and noisy.

 


Manual setting for the camera and bracketing helps.

ABAMBO | Hard- and Software Engineer | Photographer

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 17, 2022 Jan 17, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

LATEST

The horses, the rock, and the bushes are completely black with no detail. Just lifting the shadows and adjusting the blacks, 2 sliders in Lightroom, will expose the detail in those areas. You'll have the best success in adjusting the exposure if you shot in RAW.

 

In both images, proper focus is difficult to detect due to the underexposed areas. Sharpest focus should be on the main subject in the frame. Background elements can fall out of focus. Large unfocused areas in the foreground can be quite distracting. Always zoom in to at least 100% or more and scroll around in your images to verify focus and look for other defects before uploading.

 

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 17, 2022 Jan 17, 2022

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

The area around the sun is overexposed, the shadows are underexposed. The branhes and the wires need to be removed. The focus needs to be better.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines