Rejected for "Technical Issues" Ba Hombug!!!

Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 18, 2020 Oct 18, 2020

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I think the implementation of the rejection reason "Rejected for Technical Issues" is bad for both Adobe and the contributor.

If I knew why my photo got rejected, I could correct the problem, if possible, in post processing or avoid submitting  future photos with similar issues.
Now I, the contributor, have no sure way of knowing why my photo was rejected. "Artifacts?" "Saturation?" "Focus?" "Noise?". I have to guess which results in submitting the same photo several times before it gets accepted or I get tired of guessing and submitting.

In this forum, most of the post are questions about photos that have been "Rejected for Technical Issues". 

If you reject my photo, please tell me why so that I can better my submissions. This will save you, the controller, a lot of work and will benifit the quality of Adobe Stock content.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 18, 2020 Oct 18, 2020

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Naturally, this would also save me time and effort.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 18, 2020 Oct 18, 2020

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One more point. Please do not respond with the answer "Adobe is not our teacher". That is not the point I am making or asking for. I am trying to better the quality of submissions and to ease my and your process.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 18, 2020 Oct 18, 2020

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Post refused pictures here (please not 10 in one post) with the refusal reason and experienced contributors will analyze the picture and give you hints. Often the refusals are quite obvious.

ABAMBO | Hard- and Software Engineer | Photographer

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Explorer ,
Oct 18, 2020 Oct 18, 2020

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I do sort of get you on this.  While there are some images where the technical issue is fairly straightforward - focus, artifacts, CA, etc that will be picked up on the forums there are others where it is much less obvious - forum members will give opinions but they seem to be far more subjective and we have no way of knowing whether they are correct.

When it comes to "Adobe is not our teacher" - this is only partially correct.  It is indeed the case that Adobe is not there to teach us how to hold a camera straight - or straighten the horizon post.  Or how to get the focus right, how to sort CA etc - at least not on this board, I am sure on the LR and PS boards there will be plenty of support on how to do just that.  However, Adobe does have to be the teacher when it comes to things like composition, saturation and exposure levels and other parts of post processing that are more subjective in nature.  Adobe has to be the teacher because their requirements in these areas are different from everywhere else.  There can be an image that has won a camera club competition, and been accepted by other agencies that is rejected here because of subjective assessment.  If we are not told what the subjective assessment is we cannot learn how to meet Adobes requirements. 

I would like to see some way of technical requirements being made more precise - even if it is just a tick box saying focus,composition etc.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 18, 2020 Oct 18, 2020

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I don't know how much experience you have submitting to other houses, but I'm guessing it's much the same at all of them.  Adobe Stock reviewers must evaluate 1000's of submissions per day.  So if you're expecting specific reasons for rejection, you won't get it from Stock reviewers who simply haven't the time to give detailed feedback to each contributor for each submission that's received.  There aren't enough hours in a day for that.  

 

Competition is fierce.  There are a lot of very talented Stock contributors who do excellent work.  To succeed at this, your work must not only be the highest visual and technical quality, it should have some WOW factor setting it apart from all the rest.  BTW, Technical Quality is a checkbox along with other reasons for rejection.

 

That said, a reasonably intelligent person who has a working knowledge of photographic technique, proper lighting, color balance, composition and post production editing, shouldn't have any trouble figuring out what Technical Quality means.  But if you're really stumped, show us your image.  This user forum has hundreds of hours of collective experience to draw upon.  We may not be able to read the reviewer's mind exactly but we can usually get you headed in the right direction.

 

Nancy O'Shea, Adobe Product User & Community Professional
Alt-Web Design & Publishing ~ Web : Print : Graphics : Media

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Explorer ,
Oct 18, 2020 Oct 18, 2020

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Actually I would say it is not remotely the same at all.  I find at others the collection of reasons Adobe groups under "technical" are given as separates - so noise, saturation, focu, composition etc are gvien as specifics which makes it far easier for me to make sure a photo is what that specific agency is looking for.  It is especially exasperating when an image is accepted at some places but not at Adobe, and where forum feedback talks about compostion, contrast, and exposure.  We all know that different indiviudals have different preferences in these areas - and that all can be modified in post processing.  If I know Jim likes his photos ultra bright strong colour while Tim likes a more subtle moderate appearance I can finish a picture specific to those.  Yes the likes of focus, noise, etc are givens for all images - but after a cetain point composition, and post processing become subjective and sometimes "Technical reasons" is like someone saying they dont like something but not saying why.  I do not get many rejections - but the ones I do get I like to learn from.  Sure having the forum provide some opinions on them is useful - but the opinions do not always agree with each other, and there is no way of knowing what the actual rejection was. 

I think the issue is just that "technical issues" covers too wide a range.  It certainly includes areas that are basics - and that yes any competetant phtoographer should pick up on easily but it also includes areas that are more advanced and where it would a real help to know specifics.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 18, 2020 Oct 18, 2020

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How long is a piece of string?  Of course the evaluation process is subjective.  As long as humans are involved (and thank God for that), it will always be subjective. 

 

Having worked in medical imaging, I can honestly say that capturing good images is 70% science and 30% craft. If your science is too far off, no amount of craft can save it and vice versa.

 

Nancy O'Shea, Adobe Product User & Community Professional
Alt-Web Design & Publishing ~ Web : Print : Graphics : Media

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 18, 2020 Oct 18, 2020

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It's very simple: The image moderator chooses the refusal reason on the first defect in the image that he finds and refuses the imeg. The refusal reason is quite generic and gives an indication where to look for. If you really want an in depth critique of your picture, post it here and give the refusal reason as an indicator. Most of the defects are quite obvious and easy to find and very often there are many reasons to refuse an imge.

The moderator chooses a refusal reason out of the pool and he's done. If you are French, you get the refusal in French, if you are German you get it in German and if you are English (speaking) you get it in English, but it's always the same predifined answer. This system helps to safe a lot of time. Unfortunatly from your point of view, the system is optimized to safe Adobe's time and not yours, but after a while, you will get an eye for the refusals and check your images before submitting for the small details.

Some tipps:

  • In general looking at your image at 100% (or even 200%) magnification shows the nasty little arfefacts introduced by small sensors or high ISO.
  • The histogram reveals bad exposure.
  • Little parts of logos result in IP refusals
  • Faces, even smaller ones result also on refusals, if you did not submit the signed release form.
  • Some pictures get refused because the white balance is off.
  • etc.

Often the refusal reason is quite obvious for us more experienced contributors. But as the moderation is done by humans, some images may pass as others will stall with about the same quality.

 

There is an other reason for such a system: With the time, you get a feeling for what may get accepted and what get's refused.

ABAMBO | Hard- and Software Engineer | Photographer

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Explorer ,
Oct 18, 2020 Oct 18, 2020

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The problem is that the refusal reason "technical issues" covers multiple reasons.  It is your "etc" that is the issue - technical reasons can mean anything in your list and a lot that is not which makes it very hard to find the actual issue.  Someone who is new can have several photos rejected for technical issues when each one has a different issue.  It is not a case of needing an in depth from the reviewer it is a case of technical reasons not being part of the pool but being a complete jacuzzi in itself.

 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Oct 18, 2020 Oct 18, 2020

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I have contributed over 1600 accepted photos. At which point am I considered a "more expierenced contrributor"? It seems a waste of time to post the few hundred photos that have been refused to ask for help here in the forum. I only hope that I someday, might develop the needed eye. But often, its is a personal preference. Thanks for the input, discussion and the previopus help I have received here in this forum.

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