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rejected photos - the reason

New Here ,
Aug 11, 2021 Aug 11, 2021

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Hello , 

 

I have received information that my works have been rejected, can I ask for your opinion, what could be wrong with them?

The focus was intentionally set to basil, the rest was intentionally blurred. Thank you very much for the hints.

 

 

RaduchFoto

 

DSC01976a.jpgDSC01970.JPG

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correct answers 4 Correct answers

Participant , Aug 11, 2021 Aug 11, 2021
Both photos look noisy to me, and the basil doesn't look sharp in either of them.

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Adobe Community Professional , Aug 11, 2021 Aug 11, 2021
In the second picture, the basil is not well focused. I also think that too much is blurry in the pictures. Perhaps one more piece of advice that can help: Enter the search word "basil" on adobe stock and compare your pictures with the result.

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Adobe Community Professional , Aug 11, 2021 Aug 11, 2021
As others have mentioned, the basil itself, though your "focal point" in the image, is not actually in sharp focus. The composition, with a large unfocused area in the foreground, is not pleasing. Our eyes are trained to expect near objects to be in focus, and far objects to fall out of focus. In the first image, it's difficult to determine what the message is - the cheesy food, the basil, the tomatoes or the canning jars? The food object on which the basil rests is unrecognizable, which also de...

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Adobe Community Professional , Aug 12, 2021 Aug 12, 2021
Hello, I agree with @Jill_C and @Marianne-Deiters . Firstly, the composition, I don't think, is very good. I would call it rather messy. It's unbalanced. Even though you intentionally blurred the background, you need to be careful how you actually do this. Secondly, the lighting could be better; especially in the second photo. Have a read of this from Adobe about how to create better photos: https://helpx.adobe.com/stock/how-to/tips-stock-image-acceptance.html?set=stock--fundamentals--adobe-stock-contributor...

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Participant ,
Aug 11, 2021 Aug 11, 2021

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Both photos look noisy to me, and the basil doesn't look sharp in either of them.

 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 11, 2021 Aug 11, 2021

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In the second picture, the basil is not well focused. I also think that too much is blurry in the pictures. Perhaps one more piece of advice that can help: Enter the search word "basil" on adobe stock and compare your pictures with the result.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 11, 2021 Aug 11, 2021

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As others have mentioned, the basil itself, though your "focal point" in the image, is not actually in sharp focus. The composition, with a large unfocused area in the foreground, is not pleasing. Our eyes are trained to expect near objects to be in focus, and far objects to fall out of focus. In the first image, it's difficult to determine what the message is - the cheesy food, the basil, the tomatoes or the canning jars? The food object on which the basil rests is unrecognizable, which also detracts from the appeal of the image. The 2nd image is under-exposed. Food photography can be fun, though time-consuming to get it right. Anthony Scrivani did an interview on Adobe Stock recently, and his images are inspiring: 

https://stock.adobe.com/contributor/206302790/andrew-scrivani

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 12, 2021 Aug 12, 2021

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Hello,

I agree with @Jill_C and @Marianne-Deiters .

Firstly, the composition, I don't think, is very good. I would call it rather messy. It's unbalanced. Even though you intentionally blurred the background, you need to be careful how you actually do this.

Secondly, the lighting could be better; especially in the second photo.

 

Have a read of this from Adobe about how to create better photos:
https://helpx.adobe.com/stock/how-to/tips-stock-image-acceptance.html?set=stock--fundamentals--adobe...

 

 

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