Smartphones for Stock Photography

Participant ,
Apr 20, 2022 Apr 20, 2022

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It occurs to me that a large percentage of the photos posted here as rejected for "technical reasons" were taken with cell phones.

 

Would Adobe be better off requiring intact EXIF info in uploaded photos, and automatically rejecting those taken with cell phones and other small sensor devices? I know of at least one other agency that will not even consider photos unless they were taken with a "camera suitable for stock photography".

 

Yes, I know it is possible to get acceptable photos with a cell phone under ideal conditions, and rejecting cell phone photos would reject some suitable images, but overall the reviewers would have to wade through fewer unacceptable images (reducing their workload and Adobe's overhead expenses), and a higher percentage of uploaded photos would be acceptable.

 

Just a thought...

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Adobe Community Professional , Apr 20, 2022 Apr 20, 2022
There are many persons successfully uploading phone pictures to their contributor account. The problem is not that phone pictures are bad, but that people don't understand why their pictures are bad. If that was a workload issue, Adobe would probably do something against. Moreover, in my experience, most users let their EXIF data intact. I don't know, exactly, how the moderation process works, but bad pictures are mostly easy catches.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 20, 2022 Apr 20, 2022

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There are many persons successfully uploading phone pictures to their contributor account. The problem is not that phone pictures are bad, but that people don't understand why their pictures are bad. If that was a workload issue, Adobe would probably do something against. Moreover, in my experience, most users let their EXIF data intact.

 

I don't know, exactly, how the moderation process works, but bad pictures are mostly easy catches.

ABAMBO | Hard- and Software Engineer | Photographer

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 20, 2022 Apr 20, 2022

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A lot of people use their smartphones as point and shot - a modern version of the compact camera - but better as you can keep it in your pocket. However, to get a good picture from a smartphone, one needs to know the conditions it is capable of. Stock photography is not a 'point and shoot' moment' (as some people may think) or in the days of film when Kodak was popular - 'A Kodak moment'. 

(These days 'Kodak moments' are on smartphones!) So, I think smartphones can be used. One just needs to know its limitations.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 21, 2022 Apr 21, 2022

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It IS possible to acquire acceptable images with a late model cell phone camera under the right lighting conditions, so it wouldn't make sense for Adobe to automatically screen those out.

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