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Technical issues? How am I meant to improve?

Explorer ,
Jul 30, 2021 Jul 30, 2021

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I've recently had a large proportion of my photos rejected for 'Technical issues'. I've no idea what the issues are, so it's hard to know how to improve them. I regularly read articles on how to improve my photo editing workflow, so it's strange that more of my photos are rejected now unless I've unwittingly introduced a bad process into my workflow that Adobe doesn't like. Can anyone shed some light?

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Contributor critique, Troubleshooting

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correct answers 3 Correct answers

Explorer , Jul 30, 2021 Jul 30, 2021
Hola, por lo poco que se, ya que no soy un experto,pero la primera  101A7216  y la 44A3038 foto tiene aberracion cromatica , en las hojas hay un halo azuly las otras dos parece ser el enfoque pero no estoy muy seguro.

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Adobe Community Professional , Jul 30, 2021 Jul 30, 2021
Generally, I think you need to focus more on your composition. Let's talk about 44A3038. The horizon is not level. The bench and bush in the4 foreground are cropped even though there is adequate space at the top of the photo. The right side is empty and the bench is cropped on the left. The sunlight in the grass on the left is also overexposed so that all details are lost.. The following is in my opinion better composition and roughly follows the Rule of Thirds.

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Adobe Community Professional , Jul 30, 2021 Jul 30, 2021
Hi @adamb232280 , Blue color fringing and white balance issue. I generally never like anything in the forefront to be out of focus. I am not sure what the moderators would say about the bit of branch in the forefront that is out of focus seeing that the main subject seem to be in focus. Too much of this framing is out of focus. If the seaweed was the focus then you should zoom in more on it. If the landscape was the subject then you needed to set depth of field to capture the whole scene in f...

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Explorer ,
Jul 30, 2021 Jul 30, 2021

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Hola, por lo poco que se, ya que no soy un experto,

pero la primera  101A7216  y la 44A3038 foto tiene aberracion cromatica , en las hojas hay un halo azul

y las otras dos parece ser el enfoque pero no estoy muy seguro.

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Explorer ,
Jul 30, 2021 Jul 30, 2021

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Thanks for the suggestions. The blue halo in 101A7216 is just the out-of-focus background leaves. I see what you mean about 44A3038. I use the remove chromatic abberation tool in Lightroom but because of the massive dynamic range of the photo, maybe I pushed the highlights and shadow too much.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 30, 2021 Jul 30, 2021

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Generally, I think you need to focus more on your composition. Let's talk about 44A3038. The horizon is not level. The bench and bush in the4 foreground are cropped even though there is adequate space at the top of the photo. The right side is empty and the bench is cropped on the left. The sunlight in the grass on the left is also overexposed so that all details are lost..

The following is in my opinion better composition and roughly follows the Rule of Thirds.

1-Edit.jpg

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Explorer ,
Aug 02, 2021 Aug 02, 2021

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Thanks for the suggestions, Ralph. Composition can always be improved but in the end it's subjective. I composed it the way I did for a reason. I always check for a level horizon but here is no horizon in that photo; I levelled it roughly by the shrubs at the back and the vertical trees. The photo is all about the trees so I wanted them to dominate the photo and show off their size. The path on the right side draws the eye into the photo and shows a literal path to walk into the photo. Yes the bushes on the left are blown, but shooting under trees is always difficult due to the huge dynamic range. Nothing can be done about that as the camera was set to capture as much of the available range as possible. I wasn't about to start taking multiple exposures. But maybe you're right. If the reviewer didn't like my composition, then it would be rejected.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 02, 2021 Aug 02, 2021

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@Ralph Lear 's version, I think is better cropped. (Park bench) You have too much in your photo that it is distracting. In your original, the eye is being led out of the photo, and the photo isn't level. There is a noticeable slope.

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Explorer ,
Aug 02, 2021 Aug 02, 2021

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Ah I see what you are seeing as a slope. It's due to the fact that the shrubbery in the middle and right of the photo is far further forward than the lawn on the left. I guess you have to look carefully to spot this. The photo is level. I think Ralph's version ruins what I intended for the shot, i.e. the huge trees and canopy dominating the scene, which provides the dappled shade for the people. His composition tells a very different story. Maybe I didn't capture this well and it's not obvious, or it's a case of 'you had to be there'. I'm sure I could've improved on the composition. Happy to be guided by the professionals though. I guess sometimes it's a case of portraying an artificial perception rather than an accurate reprensetation of reality, which is what I try to aim for.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 02, 2021 Aug 02, 2021

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quote

If the reviewer didn't like my composition, then it would be rejected.


By @adamb232280

This picture has other defects than the composition, but yes, at the end of the day, the composition counts as well. I also think that the bench to the left is disturbing.

quote

Yes the bushes on the left are blown, but shooting under trees is always difficult due to the huge dynamic range. Nothing can be done about that as the camera was set to capture as much of the available range as possible.


By @adamb232280

You need to consider post-production. Post-production can work out many defects.

quote

The path on the right side draws the eye into the photo and shows a literal path to walk into the photo.


By @adamb232280

Are you aware that we read pictures from left to right, and this independent of other cultural influences, like the direction of writing/reading? If you want to go against the left-to-right law, then you need more than this path.

 

By re-examining that precise picture, I see more defects that are good for a single picture. It starts with the not so subjective framing, continues with missing sharpness, noticeable noise, chromatic aberration, blown out areas due to overexposure… and it ends with a Nike shoe that would create an IP refusal.

 

You got good advice here. That is what you asked for. Take it or leave it.

ABAMBO | Hard- and Software Engineer | Photographer

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Explorer ,
Aug 03, 2021 Aug 03, 2021

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Thanks for the good advice. I appreciate it (but not the attitude...)

 


@Abambo wrote:

You need to consider post-production. Post-production can work out many defects.

 

Well obviously I have considered and implemented post-production. I wouldn't have got very far without it. I've developed my own workflow over many years.

 


@Abambo wrote:

Are you aware that we read pictures from left to right, and this independent of other cultural influences, like the direction of writing/reading? If you want to go against the left-to-right law, then you need more than this path.


 

Yes I am aware of the left to right rule. Fair point.

 


@Abambo wrote:

By re-examining that precise picture, I see more defects that are good for a single picture. It starts with the not so subjective framing, continues with missing sharpness, noticeable noise, chromatic aberration, blown out areas due to overexposure… and it ends with a Nike shoe that would create an IP refusal.


 

I'm surprised that the sharpening, noise reduction and chromatic abberation tools that I used in Lightroom did not do a good job of resolving these issues.

 

Thanks again.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 30, 2021 Jul 30, 2021

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All of your pictures are missing sharpness. Furthermore, you photograph normally wide open, which makes a focus hit more difficult. And you tend also to photograph at higher ISO which hurts also sharpness. I would check my lens for back or front focus. Especially with 216 and 195 sharpness is important.

 

216: you could enhance the shadows a bit. More contrast on the feathers would help.

 

038: You photographed with ISO 2000, even that you had reserves (t=1/500s). You need to adjust the white balance to warmer tones. A lot of green in the trees fools the Wb easily to cooler tones.

 

All in all, I suppose the moderators rejected the pictures because they were missing the wow effect on subjects that are probably abundantly represented in the database. 904 is simply not exiting enough to pass like this.

 

Your gear is correct and can deliver exciting pictures. Now change your perspective and get more creative. Especially with 904 and 038 you could have chosen a more creative pov.

 

[Edit: corrected typing mistake: meant exciting, but wrote exiting 🙂 ]

ABAMBO | Hard- and Software Engineer | Photographer

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Explorer ,
Aug 02, 2021 Aug 02, 2021

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Thanks for the useful comments. Yes I agree, a few ISO errors there. Minor points by the look of it that can add up to rejection. I guess family holidays do not allow me to fully focus on my photography so compromises have to be made!

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jul 30, 2021 Jul 30, 2021

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Hi @adamb232280 ,

Blue color fringing and white balance issue. I generally never like anything in the forefront to be out of focus. I am not sure what the moderators would say about the bit of branch in the forefront that is out of focus seeing that the main subject seem to be in focus.

jacquelingphoto2017_0-1627695614160.png

 

Too much of this framing is out of focus. If the seaweed was the focus then you should zoom in more on it. If the landscape was the subject then you needed to set depth of field to capture the whole scene in focus. Also there is a white balance issue as re the blue areas on the seaweed.

jacquelingphoto2017_1-1627696000420.png

Too much blurry negative space. Needed more depth to include the bird tail within focus. Highlights destroys some details on the side of the bird. It might be slightly under exposed and there is a blue cast over the bird, meaning there is a white balance issue.

jacquelingphoto2017_2-1627696306803.png

Your focus got lost in the woods. There is a specific technique for landscape photography that you did not implement hence focusing wildly. While I do understand what you wanted to capture, I do agree that the composition is not good. You should either include both whole benches, or only one. This image also have color fringing.

jacquelingphoto2017_3-1627696997024.png

 

Best wishes

JG

Photographer and Nutrition Author

 

 

 

 

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Explorer ,
Aug 02, 2021 Aug 02, 2021

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Thanks for some useful comments. Personally, I like some foreground detail out of focus; it shows depth and draws the viewer in. Sorry I can't see any blue on the seaweed. Yes it's an unusual composition. I was trying to do something a bit different. Not everyone's cup of tea I guess. I agree with all your points about the gull, but conditions were limiting. Low light at dawn so I had to shoot wide open or risk losing sharpness. The golden dawn light means the shadows have a colder tinge. Do you think the shadows should be white so the light is more yellow? The large dynamic range causes some detail in the bird to be lost. It's a shame but I like the atmosphere of shooting at dawn. The tree shot I was trying to capture the grandness of the huge trees and people relaxing in the shade, hence the focus on the trees and benches. I guess if the reviewer does not understand what I was trying to achieve, then they would not accept it. What can I do about colour fringing in a scene with such a huge dynamic range? Thanks again.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 02, 2021 Aug 02, 2021

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Hi @adamb232280 ,

Your images were rejected because they have flaws unacceptable to Adobe customers. Based on your responses it would appear we are unable to help you.

 

So that you may know I shoot images at dusk and dawn that are accepted. I also shoot high dynamic range images that are accepted. I shoot images all time of the day, even times that I am advised not to shoot images for stock and they are accepted.

 

Adobe Photoshop will correct most color fringing. In any case correct camera settings and photographic skills reduces most fringing.

 

Customers wants to know they can easily crop subjects out of your background to place on their projects. Out of focus, or partial out of focus subjects are difficult to cut clean. Therefore to save time they'll leave your stylish image and take one that can crop easily. Hence, even if you get a sale or two, the potential for sale is lessened. Shooting for stock is all about what will maximize sale (what the customer wants), not necessarily what you want.

 

Best wishes

JG

 

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