Welcome Dialog

Welcome to the Community!

We have a brand new look! Take a tour with us and explore the latest updates on Adobe Support Community.


Tiff files go below 4 MBytes when made Jpegs

New Here ,
Jun 18, 2018 Jun 18, 2018

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I have several files from 12 MB to 21 MB as Tiffs but when converted to JPEG in Photoshop at 12 max file size they drop below 4 MB.

Any thoughts?

TOPICS
Contributors

Views

204

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines

correct answers 1 Correct answer

Adobe Community Professional , Jun 20, 2018 Jun 20, 2018
Do not be confused between MEGABYTES and MEGAPIXELS! Your pictures need to be of 4 MEGAPIXELS or higher. JPEG files of 3 to 4 MEGABYTES are probably good enough to be used on stock ​without​ visual impact due to the compression.

Likes

Translate

Translate
Adobe Employee ,
Jun 19, 2018 Jun 19, 2018

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Hi G Eric,

Thanks for reaching out to the Adobe Stock community. Are you trying to upload your artwork on Adobe Stock website and encountering the above issue or are you facing troubles with some licensed images?

If you are facing troubles with the licensed image of Adobe Stock, please mention the file IDs so that we can check the files and can further assist you.

Regards,

Twarita

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
New Here ,
Jun 19, 2018 Jun 19, 2018

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Since Adobe Stock won’t accept uploaded Tiff images they wouldn’t be licensed images. I must make high quality Jpegs from my Tiffs. And sometimes 12-20MB images only save as 3 MB jpegs which are too small for selling as stock.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Employee ,
Jun 19, 2018 Jun 19, 2018

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 20, 2018 Jun 20, 2018

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Do not be confused between MEGABYTES and MEGAPIXELS! Your pictures need to be of 4 MEGAPIXELS or higher.

JPEG files of 3 to 4 MEGABYTES are probably good enough to be used on stock ​without​ visual impact due to the compression.

ABAMBO | Hard- and Software Engineer | Photographer

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
New Here ,
Jun 20, 2018 Jun 20, 2018

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

LATEST

Thanks – that helps. I work in Mbytes so misread the megapixel requirement.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 20, 2018 Jun 20, 2018

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

This could depend on a number of factors, such as the pixel size of the original image and the number of megapixels which shouldn't be below 4MP. Remember that JPEGs are lossy compression and TIFF is generally lossless - so no compression, as I'm sure you know.

So, the decrease in file size depends on a number of factors.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines