What are the "technical issues" in my photos?

New Here ,
Jan 08, 2022 Jan 08, 2022

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correct answers 2 Correct answers

Adobe Community Professional , Jan 08, 2022 Jan 08, 2022
The photos are underexposed.  The beach scene and fountain scene have a lot of noise.  The Eiffel Tower photo seems to have a white balance / colour saturation issue besides the underexposed shadows.  The mountain scene's horizon should be levelled as well - it is all leaning to the right, and again the underexposed shadows. Also, any of the photos with recognisable people in them would require model releases. I hope this helps.

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Adobe Community Professional , Jan 08, 2022 Jan 08, 2022
Thanks for the Answer. But what if all this is the point of my pictutres?  By @Berfin22559610lzc1
I'm not convinced that chromatic aberration is the point of your pictures: The Eiffel Tower is not straight in your picture, nothing is in focus. It should be clear that Adobe does fix here the rules, and submitting here does not guaranty acceptance. You should read the contributor manual first. If you are new to stock, you should consider these resources: https://helpx.adobe.com/stock/contributor/tutorials.html...

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 08, 2022 Jan 08, 2022

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The photos are underexposed.  The beach scene and fountain scene have a lot of noise.  The Eiffel Tower photo seems to have a white balance / colour saturation issue besides the underexposed shadows.  The mountain scene's horizon should be levelled as well - it is all leaning to the right, and again the underexposed shadows.

 

Also, any of the photos with recognisable people in them would require model releases.

 

I hope this helps.


Rob R, Photographer

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New Here ,
Jan 08, 2022 Jan 08, 2022

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Thanks for the Answer. But what if all this is the point of my pictutres? 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 08, 2022 Jan 08, 2022

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I understand your point, but art photos are different than stock photos.  Take a look at what Adobe has to say on what the customers want:

 

Businesses, ad agencies, design studios, and marketers want to buy great-looking, distinctive stock photos and illustrations. For your images to have commercial value, they shouldn’t show noise or dust and they should be well-composed, appropriately lit and exposed, and processed in an inconspicuous way.

 

https://helpx.adobe.com/stock/contributor/help/photography-illustrations.html

 


Rob R, Photographer

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 08, 2022 Jan 08, 2022

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quote

Thanks for the Answer. But what if all this is the point of my pictutres? 


By @Berfin22559610lzc1

I'm not convinced that chromatic aberration is the point of your pictures:

Abambo_0-1641658554818.png

The Eiffel Tower is not straight in your picture, nothing is in focus.

 

It should be clear that Adobe does fix here the rules, and submitting here does not guaranty acceptance. You should read the contributor manual first.

 

If you are new to stock, you should consider these resources: https://helpx.adobe.com/stock/contributor/tutorials.html
Please read the contributor user manual for more information on Adobe stock contributions: https://helpx.adobe.com/stock/contributor/user-guide.html
See here for rejection reasons: https://helpx.adobe.com/stock/contributor/help/reasons-for-content-rejection.html
and especially quality and technical issues: https://helpx.adobe.com/stock/contributor/help/quality-and-technical-issues.html

 

On a personal note, I would recommend you first to learn the basics of photography before trying to break out of the usual. The water fountain as an example has a lower third that is in the dark, except that there are some droplets lost around the image border. Just by cropping the image using common wisdom (golden ratio), it will have more impact.

Abambo_1-1641659590546.png

Your mountain picture features a tree prominently in view, splitting the image in two, but neither the roots nor the top are in view. In addition, you have the houses cut off. It looks like a simple point and click image. I wouldn't put that on a postcard… For the Eiffel Tower, I would have laid my focus on the rollerblading girl. That's what is of interest in this one:

Abambo_2-1641660332077.png

Definitely, the picture is unusable for stock, because of the missing model releases, but it may be usable for art, if correctly exposed.

ABAMBO | Hard- and Software Engineer | Photographer

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Jan 08, 2022 Jan 08, 2022

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You need to understand good photographic technique BEFORE you can run rogue.  Only then can you know when and where to break rules so as not to spoil the image.

 

I always advise taking some photography courses and joining a photography club to get feedback and tips on how to improve digital images.  This user-to-user community can't teach you the fundamentals.  All we can do is tell you why we think Adobe Stock rejected them.

 

Adobe Stock customers expect the highest visual and technical quality for use in commercial projects.

 

 

 

 

Nancy O'Shea, Adobe Product User & Community Professional
Alt-Web Design & Publishing ~ Web : Print : Graphics : Media

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