Would a photo of a vintage object showing maker label be rejected due to copyright?

New Here ,
Apr 08, 2022 Apr 08, 2022

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Would photos of a vintage sewing machine that show the name 'Singer' be rejected due to copyright? Ditto pics of pages in the manual. Screenshot 2022-04-08 213013.png

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correct answers 3 Correct answers

Adobe Community Professional , Apr 08, 2022 Apr 08, 2022
You need to Photoshop "Singer" out!. As for the rest, get the colour right and beware of different other technical issues.

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Adobe Community Professional , Apr 08, 2022 Apr 08, 2022
Regardless of the year of copywrght, the name is a registered trademark and must be removed.

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Adobe Community Professional , Apr 12, 2022 Apr 12, 2022
You would need to remove 'Singer'. It won't pass otherwise!

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 08, 2022 Apr 08, 2022

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You need to Photoshop "Singer" out!. As for the rest, get the colour right and beware of different other technical issues.

ABAMBO | Hard- and Software Engineer | Photographer

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LEGEND ,
Apr 08, 2022 Apr 08, 2022

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Most copyright lasts only 100 years (that machine looks 55-65 years old), but trademarks last until they are no longer used. So that's a definite no.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 12, 2022 Apr 12, 2022

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Singer is still in use, but also if not, I doubt that it would be accepted with a trademark on, even expired.

ABAMBO | Hard- and Software Engineer | Photographer

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 08, 2022 Apr 08, 2022

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Regardless of the year of copywrght, the name is a registered trademark and must be removed.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 12, 2022 Apr 12, 2022

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You would need to remove 'Singer'. It won't pass otherwise!

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New Here ,
Apr 12, 2022 Apr 12, 2022

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Actually I have a bunch of photos where the "copyrighted" object(a tractor) is in the distance and I have cloned the name out. They still fail to pass due to "intellectual copyrights". Are the reviewers just seeing the object and assuming something without really checking to see if a name is visible?

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LEGEND ,
Apr 12, 2022 Apr 12, 2022

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"Are the reviewers just seeing the object and assuming something without really checking to see if a name is visible?"

 

They are seeing the object. You are missing a great deal of what they are looking for. A John Deere 6R 185 with the John Deere logo fuzzed out is still a John Deere tractor; the colour scheme is very distinctive. A real enthusiast could tell you it was a 6R 185. If this were accepted for stock, it could be used to advertise rival tractors - you have said so, by stating you have all IP rights. Then, John Deere could sue the rival tractor maker, the rival tractor maker could sue Adobe - and Adobe would hold you in breach of your contract and subject to unlimited damages.

 

If the artifact could be identified by its maker, and is less than maybe 100 years old, you can't use it. It's that simple. Tractor, house, chair, hammer; if it isn't generic, then you can't make money from it.

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 13, 2022 Apr 13, 2022

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The colour of the tractor may also be a trademark on itself, e.g. the iconic John Deere tractors. Without seeing the image, however, I can't help more.

ABAMBO | Hard- and Software Engineer | Photographer

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