ARTIFACTS PROBLEM

Community Beginner ,
Jun 21, 2018

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I've had the following photo rejected for 'Artifacts problem' (see following Adobe quote).

They seem to give a variety of reasons for turning the photo down. Would you say at 100% there is too much noise?

Adobe- Unfortunately, during our review we found that it features excessive post-processing and/or noise, so we can't accept it into our collection.

Excessive artifacts/noise can be caused by low light, bad camera settings, strong compression or excessive post-production.

Thank you for any thoughts.

Steve

SandCargoShip_large.jpg

Adobe Community Professional
Correct answer by ricky336 | Adobe Community Professional

Hi Steve,

Maybe because of this:

SandCargoShip_large crop.jpg

Notice in the sky area, it is a bit 'blocky'. So there isn't an even transition between the brightness levels. Look carefully at your image, especially in the sky area!

This would probably be due to the compression of the JPEG file. When shooting for stock photos (and generally) it is a good idea to shoot in raw. It gives you a lot more control in post processing - though consequently, it takes more time!

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ARTIFACTS PROBLEM

Community Beginner ,
Jun 21, 2018

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I've had the following photo rejected for 'Artifacts problem' (see following Adobe quote).

They seem to give a variety of reasons for turning the photo down. Would you say at 100% there is too much noise?

Adobe- Unfortunately, during our review we found that it features excessive post-processing and/or noise, so we can't accept it into our collection.

Excessive artifacts/noise can be caused by low light, bad camera settings, strong compression or excessive post-production.

Thank you for any thoughts.

Steve

SandCargoShip_large.jpg

Adobe Community Professional
Correct answer by ricky336 | Adobe Community Professional

Hi Steve,

Maybe because of this:

SandCargoShip_large crop.jpg

Notice in the sky area, it is a bit 'blocky'. So there isn't an even transition between the brightness levels. Look carefully at your image, especially in the sky area!

This would probably be due to the compression of the JPEG file. When shooting for stock photos (and generally) it is a good idea to shoot in raw. It gives you a lot more control in post processing - though consequently, it takes more time!

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Jun 21, 2018 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Jun 22, 2018

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Hi Steve,

Maybe because of this:

SandCargoShip_large crop.jpg

Notice in the sky area, it is a bit 'blocky'. So there isn't an even transition between the brightness levels. Look carefully at your image, especially in the sky area!

This would probably be due to the compression of the JPEG file. When shooting for stock photos (and generally) it is a good idea to shoot in raw. It gives you a lot more control in post processing - though consequently, it takes more time!

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Jun 22, 2018 4
Community Beginner ,
Jun 22, 2018

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Thanks Ricky336. Raw it is from now on!

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Jun 22, 2018 2