Declined for IP reasons... but why?

New Here ,
Aug 10, 2018 Aug 10, 2018

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I'm new with submitting stock and don't understand why a photo has been declined for IP reasons.

220_F_216783731_bA9in4oSYDmz6i166X3TMIvOQGBKjcQB.jpg

Same plane with markings: https://as2.ftcdn.net/jpg/01/64/43/69/500_F_164436961_LOpnaStdiygQuCWMnUtDAsdQTo6AAsIM.jpg

Many images do exist from military planes. I do see many where markings have been removed - I suspect US ones.

But hundreds of others from Japan, Germany, Netherlands, UK etc. that have full markings.

Is it that US military aircraft aren't allowed when you can read their markings?

Thanks for helping me understand what I haven't found in the guidelines...

Regards,

Ed

https://as2.ftcdn.net/jpg/01/64/43/69/500_F_164436961_LOpnaStdiygQuCWMnUtDAsdQTo6AAsIM.jpg

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correct answers 1 Correct Answer

Participant , Aug 10, 2018 Aug 10, 2018
Yes, though it's about your photo being used commercially more than just being a photo. I.e. you can post this shot as an editorial no problem (except Adobe don't have an option to submit editorial, only commercial).When I asked the same question, we could only speculate the reason why such photos exist on here, and we'll likely never know. There's also the chance the person got a release. It may be they just dont have the manpower to search the whole library and recheck with each photographer i...

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Participant ,
Aug 10, 2018 Aug 10, 2018

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The design of the Osprey is copyright/identifiable. As it's the subject of the photo, it's clearly a shot of this aircraft, just just "an aircraft in the sky".

Someone also told me that a lot of images were acquired when Adobe tied in with Fotolia which didnt necessarily abide by the same rules, which is why you might find similar images (I've had similar frustrating issues).

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New Here ,
Aug 10, 2018 Aug 10, 2018

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If the design is copyrighted/IP protected, then that does apply to all photo's and video's... even when previously accepted. They then should remove them all... Would be clearer as well. Removing the markings wouldn't change that... But if it is the markings... I can remove these in postprocessing...
Frustrating it is...

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Participant ,
Aug 10, 2018 Aug 10, 2018

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Yes, though it's about your photo being used commercially more than just being a photo. I.e. you can post this shot as an editorial no problem (except Adobe don't have an option to submit editorial, only commercial).

When I asked the same question, we could only speculate the reason why such photos exist on here, and we'll likely never know. There's also the chance the person got a release. It may be they just dont have the manpower to search the whole library and recheck with each photographer if there was a proper release in place.

Remove markings if you took a photo that wasn't a specific brand/product like yours. For example, you take a cityscape that has a load of hotel names and advertising in shot... remove those logos and the photo is fine for use as a cityscape. You can't recreate artwork in a commercial photo with release, which includes brand logos. Similarly, if you took a shot of birds and a plane was in shot, you remove identifying marks from the plane so it can't be identified.

Think about things as products, not what they are. I recognised it as an Osprey, not just 'a funky looking plane', As another example, you couldn't take a photo of a can of coke and say it's just a can of drink, Coke will still take you to court. Adobe are protecting your and their interests, and no doubt swing more towards caution than reason

Honestly, half my stuff gets chucked for IP, it's not you

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