Exposure Rejection

Explorer ,
Aug 16, 2018

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

DSC_0023.jpg

Exposure was the rejection reason for the rural landscape. Where? sky or tree/barn?

Adobe Community Professional
Correct answer by jacquelingphoto2017 | Adobe Community Professional

Hi templedance,

This is quite a contrasting capture. I can see the sun was very bright on the day you captured this image.  You have chosen to face the light source when capturing and hence having the darker/shadowy area of the subjects facing you. In the image as you have it the sunny area is very bright while the shadows are very dark. You can correct it by reducing the shadows, thus making it easier to see what is in the shadow areas.

You will find Create better photos for Adobe Stock with 7 tips for success | useful as it will help you to see how you can head an acceptable balance with you exposure.

TOPICS
Contributor critique

Views

222

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more

Exposure Rejection

Explorer ,
Aug 16, 2018

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

DSC_0023.jpg

Exposure was the rejection reason for the rural landscape. Where? sky or tree/barn?

Adobe Community Professional
Correct answer by jacquelingphoto2017 | Adobe Community Professional

Hi templedance,

This is quite a contrasting capture. I can see the sun was very bright on the day you captured this image.  You have chosen to face the light source when capturing and hence having the darker/shadowy area of the subjects facing you. In the image as you have it the sunny area is very bright while the shadows are very dark. You can correct it by reducing the shadows, thus making it easier to see what is in the shadow areas.

You will find Create better photos for Adobe Stock with 7 tips for success | useful as it will help you to see how you can head an acceptable balance with you exposure.

TOPICS
Contributor critique

Views

223

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Aug 16, 2018 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 16, 2018

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Hi templedance,

This is quite a contrasting capture. I can see the sun was very bright on the day you captured this image.  You have chosen to face the light source when capturing and hence having the darker/shadowy area of the subjects facing you. In the image as you have it the sunny area is very bright while the shadows are very dark. You can correct it by reducing the shadows, thus making it easier to see what is in the shadow areas.

You will find Create better photos for Adobe Stock with 7 tips for success | useful as it will help you to see how you can head an acceptable balance with you exposure.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Aug 16, 2018 1
Explorer ,
Aug 16, 2018

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I appreciate your critique of light/shadow and will apply giving it another shot ...then move forward regardless. My rejection rate is dwindling! A big yea!

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Aug 16, 2018 3
Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 17, 2018

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Hi again

When you take shots like this around midday,remember the light is very strong - especially during the summer when the sun is high. It creates strong highlights and shadows. This is where a polarising filter can help.

Again, if you use Lightroom, this can be easily fixed, and also in Adobe Photoshop by using the Camera Raw Filter. In this case, using the Auto exposure function works pretty well. Saturation and contrast can be reduced as well. You will still have to tweak the sliders when you use the auto function.

Again, here is a quick sample:

DSC_0023exposure.jpg

Notice by reducing the highlights, you can get more detail in the sky.

(PS, any other photo editing software should have similar functions.)

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Aug 17, 2018 2
Explorer ,
Aug 17, 2018

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I am constantly learning. A big thanks for your detailed critique. It was a vacation shot so time of day was not changeable. I purchased a filter but have not overcome the learning curve to turn it properly w/o fringing. I use LR exclusively.. though I'm preparing to move into Photoshop and have switched to RAW on my return from this vacation. Same way with my Nikon. I've shot auto..(yikes, don't tell) and now will be starting to use Big Girl settings on camera very soon. Thanks for all the ideas I can incorporate into my skill set. Thanks

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Aug 17, 2018 2
Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 17, 2018

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Shoot RAW and Manual only! Except on family events, where it should go fast. (I'm doing manual also for those events...)

90% of my edits are in Lr, only rarely I need to pass in Ps. Mostly for editing out something unwanted or adding something to the image.

Regards, Abambo
Hard- and Software Engineer and Photographer.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Aug 17, 2018 1
Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 17, 2018

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

You're welcome. Like with Abambo - I shoot in raw and use Lightroom mostly and Photoshop like Abambo, or when I can't do it in Lightroom.

Just be prepared, that when shooting raw, it can take more time in Lightroom and in front of the computer!

This is where JPEG can be an advantage, but you're a lot more limited!

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Aug 17, 2018 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 17, 2018

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

ricky336  wrote

Just be prepared, that when shooting raw, it can take more time in Lightroom and in front of the computer!

a) you can shoot both JPEG and RAW (that's what I did when I started with RAW 2 days after getting my first DSLR...

b) you can select all images, doing just lens correction and aberration (on the bunch of pictures) and export them to JPEG.

My workflow is:

  • Import (put into a collection, when I want to edit on my iPad)
  • flip through the images; mark Select "P" and Reject "X".
  • Delete rejected pictures
  • Add people if there are any known people (very time consuming...)
  • Lens correction, aberration correction to all
  • Filter flagged files.
  • Edit, crop at gusto
  • Eventually use different colour labels for different uses (Sometimes I need to deliver one image per situation, but I have more, so my selected ones get a colour code).
  • Export what needs to get exported.

Editing time is between 10 s (little to none edit) and minutes and hours.

I do not have a single image that gets exported as is, but I have normally very little edits to do. For stock even less, as I only correct out what is not accepted: Logos.

Regards, Abambo
Hard- and Software Engineer and Photographer.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Aug 17, 2018 0
Explorer ,
Aug 19, 2018

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I use a color system for my submissions to AS. Purple when i mark it in its folder for submission, Yellow Prep for Title, Tags, copyright. As a learning tool when that batch has been processed I change it to green or if it was rejected, red. I can sort and evaluate accept/reject. A long way around but a tool that works for me now.

My next question, if I may, is about the 'Submit to Adobe Stock' filmstrip row of our submitted shots. Do I used 'delete' and it only removes it from this spot. I think I saw a box open once that had options but I haven't managed to see it again? Always, best practice tips go a  long way. PS I love editing so the extra time is like candy. Since I started submitting I've had to balance my 'creative flow' with some 'art edits' (my passion) with the holding back for the stock. Can't have too much 'work'...wink..

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Aug 19, 2018 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 20, 2018

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I do not delete them. Only the refusals.

Regards, Abambo
Hard- and Software Engineer and Photographer.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Aug 20, 2018 1
Explorer ,
Aug 20, 2018

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Thanks again!

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Aug 20, 2018 1
Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 17, 2018

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Tree and barn, probably...

The trees are in foreground, so you would expect them not to be dark patches. Filters can help, flash can help (but not here, only if you main motive is in reach of your flash), reflectors may help (but again not here), clouds to hide the sun help for sure, changing the position is definitely a solution, but if you want to keep your position, you need probably to choose a different day time. There are apps for your phone or tablet giving you a good indication, when the light will be perfect for such a shoot.

If you have a tripod, you could even shoot brackets and composing the pictures according to the correct exposure of parts of the picture. You can use HDR programs or algorithms to put the pictures together in an automated fashion, but I've used also Photoshop and manual masking for doing so. The manual part is part of the editing fun. You will need to invest some time to get it looking right.

Regards, Abambo
Hard- and Software Engineer and Photographer.

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
Reply
Loading...
Aug 17, 2018 1