Film image rejected for artifacts

Community Beginner ,
Aug 15, 2018 Aug 15, 2018

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000451740006 | Manns Woodland Perspective | Flickr

Image above, was rejected due to artifacts in the image. This is straight from The Dark Room scan files and no tweaks in LR.
Perhaps the artifacts are the out of focused sections of this Mum on the right side? If that is the case, is it acceptable to crop out that area and resubmit to the mods?

It is a little frustrating that a film image right off the scanner is rejected for something that isnt very obvious?


Thanks for all your help.

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Adobe Community Professional , Aug 15, 2018 Aug 15, 2018
Yes, the out of focus part may be a reason, but I suspect also the film grain to plai a role in the rejection.  Rejections are never obvious if the image is technically ok.However, as Mat Hayward from Adobe said: pictures of flowers as well as sunsets and sunrises need to have the wow effect to be accepted as there are so many of them...

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 15, 2018 Aug 15, 2018

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Yes, the out of focus part may be a reason, but I suspect also the film grain to plai a role in the rejection.  Rejections are never obvious if the image is technically ok.

However, as Mat Hayward from Adobe said: pictures of flowers as well as sunsets and sunrises need to have the wow effect to be accepted as there are so many of them...

ABAMBO | Hard- and Software Engineer | Photographer

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Community Beginner ,
Aug 15, 2018 Aug 15, 2018

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Thank you,

I'll have to try to use a lower grain film if I want to submit film shots in the future.

Meantime, time to crop and remove some grain  

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 16, 2018 Aug 16, 2018

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As film has its charm, stock images are nit asking for charmed images and for shure not for artistic realisations, but for images that can be used as is or reworked at the buyers discretion!

ABAMBO | Hard- and Software Engineer | Photographer

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 15, 2018 Aug 15, 2018

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As you have scanned this image - I guess from a print - you are going to get signs of artifacts. This can be easily seen in the upper left hand corner - the blue area - of the image. (Grain like appearance.) You'll have to do some editing to reduce this - noise reduction maybe. For Adobe this is a quality problem. The image has to be free from imperfections.

Also, as mentioned, there are thousands/millions of such images, so it has to stand out from the crowd!

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Community Beginner ,
Aug 15, 2018 Aug 15, 2018

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I see what you mean about standing out.

But this is a scan from a 35mm color negative, not a print. It was taken on a Canon AE-1 Program on Kodak Portra 400 with a prime 50m at f5.6

The blue background is actually my house and not an artifact. I figured the blue went well with the rusty orange mum.  

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Aug 16, 2018 Aug 16, 2018

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Just to clarify, I mentioned the blue area because it was easier to see the grain or rather noise. Since this image was converted to a digital format, the grain from the film is noise in digital. Noise can be seen across the image. Adobe want 'clean' images. In the age of digital, it is easy now to add filters to get a film like appearance. But not the other way round. It limits choice for the buyer.

So, to reduce the 'grain', which is 'noise' in digital, you can use the noise reduction filter. There isn't such a thing as 'grain reduction' in digital. (Not yet anyway.)

The artifacts rejection reason includes noise.

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