How much post processing do we do?

New Here ,
May 15, 2019

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Hello,

I am confused as to how much post processing to do on my photos.  One photo was rejected because buyers "...prefer to do their own processing..." .  In this second case, this photo was rejected due to "image quality" issues.  I shot it in RAW and did very little post processing to it.  I was afraid to increase the exposure too much, for one thing.  Another thing I did notice about this photo is when I examined it in Lightroom as a JPG in the catalog, it was not as sharp as when I looked at it RAW. 

I would appreciate constructive criticism on this photo.

early_sun_behind_rock_formation.jpg

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Correct answer by Abambo | Adobe Community Professional

First: shoot raw

Second: do as much postprocessing as necessary to get a picture that looks like no postprocessing has been applied. Reduce noise, but not that much that details get blown out. Add saturation but not too much so that the picture does not look oversaturated. Sharpen, but not so much that there is a halo around the picture. Do your white balance so that the colours are natural. Etc, etc.

You get the trick? The image should appear to be unprocessed, even if you did heavy processing. When you export your raw file, the resulting JPEG should look exactly as your processed raw file. If it does not, you made an error. If it io not sharp, may be you down sampled the image. Or you did apply compression.  JPEG quality should be at max. Anytime! Except if you have a such high resolution camera that the resulting file gets to big. I doubt there is something on the market you can buy with money that will create to high resolution pictures (well if I remember well, the max is 100Mp and there are cameras having more than that ).

Ok and as the forum thread did not show me your attached picture, I will have a look at that in a second post!

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How much post processing do we do?

New Here ,
May 15, 2019

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Hello,

I am confused as to how much post processing to do on my photos.  One photo was rejected because buyers "...prefer to do their own processing..." .  In this second case, this photo was rejected due to "image quality" issues.  I shot it in RAW and did very little post processing to it.  I was afraid to increase the exposure too much, for one thing.  Another thing I did notice about this photo is when I examined it in Lightroom as a JPG in the catalog, it was not as sharp as when I looked at it RAW. 

I would appreciate constructive criticism on this photo.

early_sun_behind_rock_formation.jpg

Adobe Community Professional
Correct answer by Abambo | Adobe Community Professional

First: shoot raw

Second: do as much postprocessing as necessary to get a picture that looks like no postprocessing has been applied. Reduce noise, but not that much that details get blown out. Add saturation but not too much so that the picture does not look oversaturated. Sharpen, but not so much that there is a halo around the picture. Do your white balance so that the colours are natural. Etc, etc.

You get the trick? The image should appear to be unprocessed, even if you did heavy processing. When you export your raw file, the resulting JPEG should look exactly as your processed raw file. If it does not, you made an error. If it io not sharp, may be you down sampled the image. Or you did apply compression.  JPEG quality should be at max. Anytime! Except if you have a such high resolution camera that the resulting file gets to big. I doubt there is something on the market you can buy with money that will create to high resolution pictures (well if I remember well, the max is 100Mp and there are cameras having more than that ).

Ok and as the forum thread did not show me your attached picture, I will have a look at that in a second post!

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May 15, 2019 0
Adobe Community Professional ,
May 15, 2019

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First: shoot raw

Second: do as much postprocessing as necessary to get a picture that looks like no postprocessing has been applied. Reduce noise, but not that much that details get blown out. Add saturation but not too much so that the picture does not look oversaturated. Sharpen, but not so much that there is a halo around the picture. Do your white balance so that the colours are natural. Etc, etc.

You get the trick? The image should appear to be unprocessed, even if you did heavy processing. When you export your raw file, the resulting JPEG should look exactly as your processed raw file. If it does not, you made an error. If it io not sharp, may be you down sampled the image. Or you did apply compression.  JPEG quality should be at max. Anytime! Except if you have a such high resolution camera that the resulting file gets to big. I doubt there is something on the market you can buy with money that will create to high resolution pictures (well if I remember well, the max is 100Mp and there are cameras having more than that ).

Ok and as the forum thread did not show me your attached picture, I will have a look at that in a second post!

Regards, Abambo
Hard- and Software Engineer and Photographer.

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May 15, 2019 1
Adobe Community Professional ,
May 15, 2019

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99CB2284-73D7-400A-A6C5-751C2D57A1DB.jpeg

Something like this:

E32F6DAE-0692-473C-8FB2-A6B0104B3E10.jpeg

Regards, Abambo
Hard- and Software Engineer and Photographer.

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May 15, 2019 1
New Here ,
May 15, 2019

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Thank you for the feedback.  I was uncertain if increasing the exposure and changing the contrast was the right thing to do.  I second-guessed myself, undid my postprocessing and sent the photo out.  Because you took time to explain a few things to me, I will now be more confident with my postprocessing and follow my instincts, as I should have done before I submitted the photo. 

I sincerely appreciate your guidance and advice.

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