I don't quite get why my photo was rejected

New Here ,
Mar 08, 2021 Mar 08, 2021

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Hi, 

so I posted a photo with quite shallow depth of field, but the main subject - a rose - in focus. Would anyone mind giving me some info as to why it would have been rejected? Thanks!

Paloma Briceno
IG: @palomabriceno
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correct answers 1 Correct Answer

Adobe Community Professional , Mar 08, 2021 Mar 08, 2021
Hi @PalomaBriceno , The rose is beautiful. It is a little too shallow, hence not completely in focus. Some of the edges are a little soft and will be difficult to crop. Also I am not sure if the color of the edge might cause some concern. For me it is not a big deal, but it could be might be misinterpreted as fringing. Zoom to 200% and inspect the edges. You will see the difference of the sharp edges and the soft ones. Best wishes JG

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 08, 2021 Mar 08, 2021

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What was the reason Adobe Stock gave for rejecting it -- technical Issues or something else?  See links below.

 

Look at what other Stock contributors are doing in the same keyword category. 

 

It's not like they don't have millions & millions of roses already.  To be accepted in a fiercely competitive category like this, your work must be visually & technically perfect and special enough to set it apart from all the rest.

 

Hope that helps,

 

Nancy O'Shea, Adobe Product User & Community Professional
Alt-Web Design & Publishing ~ Web : Print : Graphics : Media

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New Here ,
Mar 08, 2021 Mar 08, 2021

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Yes, it was technical issue, so imagine the "fiercely competitive" aspect of it wasn't considered in this picture. 

 

Best,

Paloma Briceno
IG: @palomabriceno

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 09, 2021 Mar 09, 2021

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quote

Yes, it was technical issue, so imagine the "fiercely competitive" aspect of it wasn't considered in this picture. 

 

Best,


By @PalomaBriceno

Hi Paloma,

"Fiercely competitive" means that the picture needs to be 100% OK and there should be "a wow factor" with the image. This said, I have some flower/plant pictures of mine in the database, and not all have that wow factor, some are simply correctly taken, in focus and well lighted. It depends a lot on the moderator...

 

If the picture is technically correct and the moderator wants to refuse it, he will do so based on "commercial appeal".

ABAMBO | Hard- and Software Engineer | Photographer

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 08, 2021 Mar 08, 2021

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Hi @PalomaBriceno ,

The rose is beautiful. It is a little too shallow, hence not completely in focus. Some of the edges are a little soft and will be difficult to crop. Also I am not sure if the color of the edge might cause some concern. For me it is not a big deal, but it could be might be misinterpreted as fringing. Zoom to 200% and inspect the edges. You will see the difference of the sharp edges and the soft ones.

jacquelingphoto2017_0-1615247253471.png

Best wishes

JG

 

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New Here ,
Mar 08, 2021 Mar 08, 2021

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Thanks for the advice and review, Jaqueline. Very helpful!

 

Best,

 

Paloma

Paloma Briceno
IG: @palomabriceno

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 09, 2021 Mar 09, 2021

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You are welcome @PalomaBriceno 

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Adobe Community Professional ,
Mar 09, 2021 Mar 09, 2021

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You could try the following:

  • sharpen the blossom without introducing artefacts
  • add noise reduction to the background
  • add some vibrancy
  • add some local contrast (texture)

 

You may try to resubmit after this. But the blossom needs really to be sharp as that is where the eye will be guided to.

 

Setting the aperture value higher may help. I would guess that at f8 the background will still be blurred, but the rose would be somehow sharper.

 

And not to be ignored:

The lens you used should be crisp sharp (prime lenses normally are, and you used an L lens), but you may need to calibrate the focus, as even a slight front or back focus will cause trouble.

 

 

ABAMBO | Hard- and Software Engineer | Photographer

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