Requesting advice after rejection

New Here ,
Apr 24, 2018 Apr 24, 2018

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

NS-PC_6823.jpg

Rejected for excessive post processing and/or noise.  I rather like this picture, partially for sentimental reasons, a beautiful early autumn experience in Nova Scotia and It makes a lovely print on aluminum. I wondered if it can be rescued for stock quality.  I can see an obvious fringe where the features meet the sky, and wondered what else I should be looking for and how to deal with it. Also, Is the composition any good; is it too blue; is the resolution and detail poor; if faults were removed, would it be worth resubmitting?  I welcome any critique, comments, suggestions, advice, and help. Thanks in advance.

pao613

TOPICS
Contributor critique

Views

109

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines

correct answers 1 Correct Answer

Advisor , Apr 25, 2018 Apr 25, 2018
This photo is good for magazines of the area, Chamber of Commerce, boating hobbyists, and so many others. Just look around you and try closer to home for a while. Postcards markets in the area might be interested in this one too. Do see Adobe good tips and  Infomation for New Stock contributors. Seafood Resturants might like a large print on their wall. Best, JH

Likes

Translate

Translate
Adobe Community Professional ,
Apr 25, 2018 Apr 25, 2018

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

From your camera information, the Canon Powershot SD400 has 5 megapixels which maybe a bit too small resolution, even though the requirements are a minimum of 4 megapixels. And as you can only record in JPEG, you are already compressing the image. This is why being able to shoot in raw format has a great advantage - especially when wanting to upload as stock images.

In your photo, there are signs of compression which can seen when viewed at 100%:

NS-PC_6823.jpg

I think the reviewers are referring to these kinds of problems. So, I think that the resolution is rather too low for stock photos (generally speaking). I think your composition is fine though!

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Advisor ,
Apr 25, 2018 Apr 25, 2018

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

I do like the photo, If you can see problems at the horizon line then there are problems that cause rejection. rickey336 offers good advice. Don't forget the Adobe Guidelines for Stock Contributors. Worth reading if you are going to continue to offer photos for review with Adobe. Know your client's needs and requirements. Best regards, JH

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
New Here ,
Apr 25, 2018 Apr 25, 2018

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

Thank you joanh22203655

Both you and rickey336 have confirmed my suspicions regarding the Peggy’s Cove picture. I realize that the original was taken at a fairly low resolution for stock, and as rickey335 points out, the in-camera processing into jpeg already compresses and modifies the image file. I have since moved up to cameras with RAW capability and higher resolution, and I will try working with them for stock submissions. The image does look nice on a glossy aluminum print even at 20” x 30”, but, of course, viewed from a normal distance. It really enhances the water and reflections, but since have my “nose rubbed in it” I can’t help picking up on the light fringing on the roof lines. (I understand that there are clever tricks in Photoshop to mask this type of fringing, and I may have to learn them if I do more prints of this picture.)

With regard to your advice to "know your client’s needs and requirements", I am just starting to try stock submissions and only have the stock photo acceptance requirements in mind, and should go over them again with greater attention. From your experience do you have advice on the other types of client I should consider for this type of picture i.e. landscapes?

Thanks again

pao613

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines
Advisor ,
Apr 25, 2018 Apr 25, 2018

Copy link to clipboard

Copied

LATEST

This photo is good for magazines of the area, Chamber of Commerce, boating hobbyists, and so many others. Just look around you and try closer to home for a while. Postcards markets in the area might be interested in this one too. Do see Adobe good tips and  Infomation for New Stock contributors. Seafood Resturants might like a large print on their wall. Best, JH

Likes

Translate

Translate

Report

Report
Community Guidelines
Be kind and respectful, give credit to the original source of content, and search for duplicates before posting. Learn more
community guidelines